Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • A rail trial steeped in Colonial and Maritime history
  • The trail connects with the Coast Park, a 28km shared use trail along a continuous sandy beach coast line
  • The trail links with several side trails that explore the Port Dock precinct and the coastal beach area of Semaphore
  • A flat 23.5km ride on quiet roads and paths, adjacent to an existing railway line
  • Suitable for all the family

Attractions

  • Three quality Museums in one street – National Railway Museum, SA Aviation Museum and SA Maritime Museum
  • Port Dock historic precinct
  • Access to the Coast Park and beach facilities
  • Anna Rennie (Inner Harbour) Loop Trail

Trail Guide

The trail is divided into three sections commencing from the Adelaide Parklands and following the existing rail corridor to the Port Dock precinct and then on to the Outer Harbour.  The Outer Harbour Railway Line was constructed in 1856 to transport passengers and freight between Adelaide and the Outer Harbour / Port Dock sea ports.

Section Guides

Adelaide Parklands to Woodville Railway Station (8 km)

The trail commences on the cycle track near the Morphett Street Bridge and follows the River Torrens and the rail line westward past the Torrens Weir and then under the railway line into Bonython Park. Follow the river to the first bridge and cross it and continue to the edge of the Park Lands where the path turns right and crosses the railway line again and follows the line under the roadway. From this point onward the trail is clearly marked and progresses through the new Bowden / Brompton housing development and utilises bridges to cross main roads.

The trail follows the quiet suburban streets adjacent to the railway line through to the Woodville Railway Station. If you need a rest, stop at the MJ McInerney Reserve.

 

Woodville Railway Station to Port Dock Precinct (6 km)

At the Woodville Railway Station continue straight on. There is a path on the opposite side of the railway line that follows the branch line toward the suburb of Grange. This path is still in development but will soon form a rail side trail.

The trail continues on either quiet streets or shared use paths however there are several points where the trail crosses main roads. Fortunately, the crossing points are controlled by traffic lights.

The path passes under Grand Junction Road, winds through suburban streets until it enters the old Port Dock rail yards. At this point you will see the Aviation Museum, then, in Lipson Street, you will pass the Railway Museum and once you cross St Vincent Street you will see the Maritime Museum on the right. All the Museums are excellent for children and can take some time to visit.

Please note that Lipson Street is one way so the return trip uses Timpson Street – please check the Rail Trails Map.

You are now in the Port Dock Precinct and you will come to the Port River at the end of Lipson Street. You may notice some interesting paving along the wharf area which indicates where some of the old railway lines were located. This area had numerous train, tram and trolly bus tracks, along wharfs, down streets and over bridges. There is an interesting shared use 3.5km trail (the Anna Rennie Loop Trail) that circles the Port Dock area. Further details are available in the Side Trails section below.

 

Port Dock Precinct to Outer Harbour (9.5 km)

The trail uses the Birkenhead Bridge to cross the Port River and then crosses Semaphore Road and follows the existing rail line along Mead Street and then weaves its way through suburbia until finally crossing the rail line into Lady Ruthven Drive. The trail crosses Lady Ruthven Drive and then continues on a short distance to a large roundabout. Follow the shared use path to the left until you get to Lady Ruthven Reserve and the Outer Harbour Lookout. This is the end of the rail trail however there is a great option for the return trip by following the Coast Park shared use trail south along the coast to Semaphore and then returning to Port Dock via the Semaphore Rail Trail.

 

Side Routes

Anna Rennie Loop Path – previously known as the Inner Harbour Loop rail trail (3.5km loop)

Please note that the Anna Rennie Loop Trail overlaps the Outer Harbour Rail Trail where it crosses the Port River (Birkenhead Bridge) and follows Jenkins Street and a small section of Semaphore Road.

The Loop trail circles the Port Dock precinct, also known as the New Port which replaced the Old Port dock which was further upstream in the Port River and was basically a mosquito infested, smelly swamp. It was so despised by the colonists that it was called Port Misery. The New Port on the other hand was well constructed on reclaimed land with modern timber wharfs and bridges. The loop circles the Port River and provides cyclists and walkers with convenient and safe path. The trail has many interactive maps that allow the viewer to superimpose historical photographs from a century ago over todays view of the Port. Also of interest, is Hart’s Mill Playground, a convenient place to rest while the kids burn-off some energy. Further details and maps can be found in the Information and Links section below

 

Coast Park Trail

A 28km trail which follows the coast from Outer Harbour to Seacliff, south of Adelaide. Please note that a 5km section of the trail currently follows Military Road from Third Avenue Semaphore Park to the Grange Jetty. This 5km section is expected to be converted into a shared use path along the coast over the next few years. The Coast Park also connects with the Mike Turtur Rail Trail and the River Torrens Linear Park. Further information is available from the TrailsSA – see the link below.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Kaurna people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

 

Development and future of the rail trail

The Rosewater Loop is a potential Rail trail of 5km in length that would connect the Outer Harbour Rail Trail with the Port River Bikeway via Eastern Parade. The loop was constructed in 1915 to alleviate congestion in the Port Dock rail yards and is no longer in use.

 

Rail line history

The Railway between Adelaide and the Port Dock Railway Station was opened in 1856 and was the second railway in South Australia and is believed to be the first Government owned railway in the British Empire. The rail line was later extended to Outer Harbour when a deeper sea port was required.

The Port Dock area was incredibly busy, bringing immigrants and produce in from abroad and exporting copper and farm produce to the world. All of this movement needed an efficient transport system. Port Road which runs parallel to the existing rail way line has an extraordinary width of more that 60m and is relatively flat and it was proposed by Colonel William Light in 1836 that a canal should be constructed between Adelaide and the Port Dock precinct. The proposal was romantic but did not measure up against the cost effective and efficient new rail technology that was emerging.

The Port Dock area became a maze of small rail lines, mostly privately owned and connected to the Wharf area and smelters. There were horse drawn trams, trains and trolly buses, steam trains and electric trams. Confusion reigned as no one knew who had right of way and no one cared because the private transport operators had to make money to survive. Eventually the port activity declined, the small private transport operators closed down and the State Government railway and bus services were all that remained.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
The Perth–Fremantle Principal Shared Path (PSP) is a high-quality urban dual use pathway that runs parallel to the Fremantle railway line through Perth’s western suburbs. At 20 km long, the path can be cycled in an hour or walked in approximately four hours.

Attractions

  • Various historical and cultural attractions in and around Perth CBD
  • Café and retail precincts in Subiaco, Claremont, Swanbourne, Cottesloe and North Fremantle
  • Spectacular views over the Indian Ocean
  • The historic harbour city of Fremantle

Section Guides

Yagan Square to Subiaco (3.7 km)

Starting at the Yagan Square digital tower, the path heads west along Wellington St to Perth Arena. Yagan Square and Perth Arena were developed as part of the Perth City Link project, which involved sinking a short section of the Fremantle line, reconnecting the Perth CBD with Northbridge.

After rejoining the railway on the northern side of Perth Arena, the PSP continues west past City West and West Leederville Stations. Approaching Subiaco, the remains of Subiaco Oval (home of Australian Rules Football in WA between 1908 and 2017) can be seen on the left. After crossing beneath Haydn Bunton Drive, the railway enters another tunnel. The PSP continues at surface level through the Market Square parklands before arriving at Subiaco Station at the northern end of Rokeby Rd.

 Subiaco to Claremont (5.8 km)

Leaving Subiaco, the PSP continues on the northern side of Roberts Rd through the Subi Centro redevelopment area. The PSP passes beneath Hay St via an underpass, where it rejoins the railway at Jolimont Park. Heading southwest, the PSP continues along the western side of the railway past Daglish, Shenton Park, Karrakatta and Loch Street Stations. Key points of interest along this section include the Irwin Army Barracks and Karrakatta Cemetery.

The path runs along the southern edge of Claremont Showgrounds, home of the WA Royal Agricultural Society and Perth Royal Show before arriving at Claremont Station – one of the oldest and most historic stations on the Perth rail network. Claremont itself is a major retail area home to many restaurants, cafes, and speciality stores.

Claremont to North Fremantle (7.0 km)

Heading south, the PSP continues on the western side of the railway. Smaller retail precincts can be found along Claremont Crescent (near Swanbourne Station) and Napoleon St (near Cottesloe Station). There is a connecting path to Cottesloe Beach along Forrest St.  Cottesloe Beach is one of the most famous beaches in Perth, and is home to the annual Sculptures by the Sea art exhibition. The section between Mosman Park and North Fremantle stations offers spectacular views over the Indian Ocean.

North Fremantle to Fremantle (2.9 km)

Between North Fremantle Station and the Swan River, the best route is via Pearse St. Users are advised to take care when crossing Tydeman Rd, a busy freight route. On the southern side of Tydeman Rd the path continues behind the Swan Hotel and on to the historic Fremantle Traffic Bridge. The final section between the Swan River and central Fremantle can be undertaken using Beach St (where there is a footpath and on-road bike lanes) or via the shared path on Peter Hughes Dr. Beach St runs past the historic Fremantle Woolstores, whereas Peter Hughes Dr runs past the Fremantle Passenger Terminal and E-Shed Markets.

Background Information

Traditional owners

Rail Trails Australia acknowledges the Whadjuk people of the Noongar Nation, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which this pathway is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

Over the next few years, the PSP will be extended from North Fremantle Station to the Swan River as part of the Swan River Crossings project, which includes replacement of the existing Fremantle Traffic Bridge and duplication of the rail bridge.

Rail line history 

The Fremantle railway line connects Perth with Fremantle. The line opened on 1 March 1881 as the “Eastern Railway” and ran between Fremantle and Guildford via central Perth. In July 1926, the Fremantle Railway Bridge over the Swan River was partly washed away in a flood, with one line restored in 1926 and the second in 1928.

Passenger services on the Fremantle line were suspended in September 1979. The WA Government planned to convert the railway reserve into a busway. The closure of the line was opposed by Friends of the Railway, which submitted a petition of 100,000 signatures and prepared a 98-page report arguing for its retention. The service was reinstated in July 1983 following a change of government. The railway was electrified in 1991. Over the years, two sections of the railway have been ‘sunk’. The Subiaco tunnel opened in 1998 and the Perth City Link tunnel opened in 2014.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
This short, attractive pathway is a popular off-road cycle route. Views are mainly bush with some rural residential housing. Signage reveals items and locations of historical significance, particularly relating to the mining history of the area, including tragedies such as the deaths of 96 miners and rescuers in a coal mine explosion in 1902. There is also information on cutting of red cedar timber. The pathway ends at the site of the former Nebo Colliery’s Bradford breaker building. 
  • The top section of the pathway is suitable for walkers and mountain bikes only.

Attractions

  • The historic Mount Kembla Village Hotel
  • Soldiers and Miners Memorial Church
  • Relics from the American Creek kerosene works
  • Lookouts, walking tracks and tourist drives of the Illawarra escarpment
  • Many beaches and Lake Illawarra
  • Good cycling options, including railside trails, to Wollongong or Pt Kembla
  • City of Wollongong

Trail Guide

The trail can be accessed from: 

  • A small carpark southeast of 200 Cordeaux Rd
  • Carpark and monument on Stones Rd
  • Kirkwood Place

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Dharawal people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail

The Pathway was completed in stages, with the final Stage 3 to the Bradford breaker site completed in October 2016.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
When completed, this 20km rail trail will connect the large inland NSW city of Wagga Wagga to the rural village of Ladysmith to the southeast. The trail will pass Wagga Wagga airport, running mainly through open country or lightly-wooded farmland. The trail is at the western end of the Riverina Highlands rail trail, with stage 1 between Tumbarumba and Rosewood at the eastern end now open. Wagga Wagga to Ladysmith is stage 2, and its construction may encourage further development of the remaining sections from Ladysmith to Tarcutta (on the Hume Highway) and on to Humula and Rosewood.    

Attractions

  • Wagga Wagga is a major inland city in New South Wales, situated on the Murrumbidgee River, and is the major regional centre for the Riverina
  • Ladysmith is a rural town with an extensive agricultural and railway history
  • The Riverina area offers a large range of tourism experiences
  • In the Wagga Wagga area, the trail will form part of the local bicycle network and will provide an off-road commuting option between the suburb of Forest Hill and the downtown area
  • Ladysmith station has a large display of railway heritage memorabilia

Trail Guide

The trail will commence in central Wagga Wagga, running along the disused ex-government branch line that once connected Wagga Wagga with Tumbarumba.

Access to the trail will be provided near the Wagga Wagga CBD and also at the Equex Centre sports complex, with links to the Kooringal Rd and Riverside cycleways.

The trail will end at the Ladysmith railway station trailhead.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Wiradjuri people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail will be built.

Development and future of the rail trail

The local rail trail group has been working for many years to promote this rail trail. The success of the Tumbarumba-Rosewood rail trail has provided a boost to their efforts. On 26th July 2021, Wagga Wagga Regional Council voted unanimously to support the development of rail trails in the Wagga Wagga region. This positive step will enable detailed planning to begin, with next steps expected in March 2022.

Railway History 

The Tumbarumba branch line from Wagga Wagga opened in 1917, passing through Ladysmith, Tarcutta, Humula, Rosewood and terminated at Tumbarumba.

Passenger services ceased on the line in 1974, and all operations on the line stopped in 1987.  The station at Ladysmith is the only surviving station structure on the rail corridor.

From Ladysmith, the rail corridor extends further east to Tarcutta, crossing the Hume Highway just to the south of the Tarcutta township. Remnants of the railway are visible from the highway.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Wagga Wagga City Council votes to support rail trails

Posted: 31/07/21

Wagga Wagga City Council voted unanimously on 26 July to give in-principle support for the development ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
This proposed 29 km rail trail is located in a farmland area, 35 minutes by car from Yass and about 90 minutes from Canberra. It features cuttings, curves and old timber bridges as it makes its way northeast from Galong toward Boorowa.  Boorowa, in the Hilltops tourism region, has many historic buildings. European settlement dates from the 1820s. Boorowa is known for its annual ‘running of the sheep’ festival. In the local indigenous language, boorowa means bird; the region has abundant bird life.  Galong township also features historic buildings and has the nearby St Clements Retreat, a historic monastery open to the public. The proposed rail trail passes within 500 m of St Clements, with easy access from the rail trail when built, or by road. 

Attractions

  • Boorowa is a picturesque regional town offering a range of tourist attractions
  • The Hilltops region has a lot to offer visitors – see links below
  • St Clements Retreat near Galong is an ex-monastery open to the public
  • The Boorowa Irish WoolFest is an annual event to celebrate ‘everything wool’ – see link below

Trail Guide

The trail will run for 29 km through rolling, partly wooded farmland. There will be a number of access points, including one near the Boorowa River bridge.  

A trailhead is planned for McMahon Street in Galong. At the Boorowa end, the trail will end near the town’s golf course. 

Important note: This rail trail is not yet open. The alignment is owned by Transport NSW and much of it passes through private property. Trespassing on the alignment is prohibited. 

Section Guides

This trail is not yet open.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Ngunawal people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail will be built.

Development and future of the rail trail

Local community advocates for the Boorowa to Galong rail trail are working to bring this trail on a long-abandoned government rail corridor to life for the benefit of local businesses.  

The group is aiming to build on the success of the Tumbarumba to Rosewood rail trail, which has seen a number of new businesses opened in the Tumbarumba region since the rail trail opened in 2020. 

Rail line history 

The Galong to Boorowa railway line opened in October 1914, as a branch of the main Southern NSW railway. The line was used mainly to transport livestock and produce. Passenger services were closed in 1974.

There are now few remnants of the railway infrastructure, though the corridor and rails are visible in many places. Most timber bridges are still in place, and the turntable and water stand are still at the Boorowa end.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Another potential rail trail in New South Wales

Posted: 17/06/21

Following the successful rail trails forum in Tumbarumba in April 2021, another potential rail trail has ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
This potential rail trail is a hidden gem in Sydney’s western suburbs.  It will provide a natural linkage with surrounding green spaces and pathways, including the popular Cooks River pathway between Botany Bay, Strathfield and Homebush.  It will be accessible from Lidcombe station via Bachell Avenue at the southern end, and from Edwin Flack Avenue in the northern end, just across from the Sydney Olympic Park athletics warm-up arena.  The existing link between the Cooks River pathway and Olympic Park is on-road for most of the trip. The proposed Pippita rail trail would provide a quieter off-road path via historic Rookwood Cemetery and Lidcombe T1 train station.   

Attractions

  • Sydney Olympic Park is the sporting hub of greater Sydney, having hosted the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games 
  • The Sydney Olympic Park precinct connects many walking and cycling trails along the Parramatta River
  • Lidcombe offers culinary and cultural experiences 
  • This short trail would connect the transport hub at Lidcombe with the greater western network of off-road trails.

Trail Guide

The trail is relatively short at 3 km, but when completed will provide a natural linkage with surrounding green spaces and pathways. 

It will be accessible from Bachell Avenue at the southern end, and from Edwin Flack Avenue in the northern end, on the edge of Sydney Olympic Park.  

Lidcombe has many shops and restaurants, and Sydney Olympic Park has restaurants, cafes and hotels. It also has a regular suburban train service on the T1 line. 

Sydney Olympic Park has historical sites and good tourist, cycling and walking amenities. The Parramatta River is at the north end of the area. There are off-road cycle paths to Parramatta, Liverpool and Prospect Reservoir, and safe cycling paths from Parramatta through Westmead to the 42 km M7 cycleway.  

Important note: This rail trail is not yet open. The alignment is owned by Transport NSW and most of it passes through private property. Trespassing on the alignment is prohibited. 

Section Guides

This trail is not yet open.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Dharug people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail will be built.

Development and future of the rail trail

The trail will begin at the northern side of Lidcombe station, running off Bachell Ave. It will be to the east of existing warehouses in both Bachell Ave and Birnie St. The alignment ends at Edwin Flack Ave in Olympic Park.  

The rail trail will be easily accessible from either Lidcombe or Olympic Park train stations. 

Rail line history 

The Pippita rail trail will use the former goods railway line alignment that existed before Sydney Olympic Park was constructed. A spur line from Lidcombe to a meatworks at Pippita was closed in 1995. 

There are disused bridges over Parramatta Road and the M4 motorway, just to the west of the current suburban rail line, that will be re-used as part of the rail trail.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Rapid progress on the Pippita Trail (Lidcombe to Sydney Olympic Park)

Posted: 25/09/20

The potential of the Pippita Trail has been identified and rapid initial progress has been ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • The Goods Line offers a refuge from the busy Sydney CBD. It is a linear park and green space with public seating, performance areas, lawns, table tennis tables and items of railway heritage, and has won many design awards

Attractions

  • The Goods Line passes the University of Technology (UTS) campus, ABC studios, Ian Thorpe Aquatic Centre, Darling Harbour and the Powerhouse Museum

Trail Guide

Stage 1 of the Goods Line can be reached from Central Railway Station’s Devonshire St pedestrian tunnel in the south, and at various points along its route to the Powerhouse Museum in the north. There are displays and relics along the route that showcase railway heritage, including Ultimo Rd’s heritage railway bridge.

The Line can be ridden, but for such a short length with so many features, a slow stroll is better.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Gadigal people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

The port facilities at Darling Harbour closed and the precinct was extensively redeveloped in the 1980s. The disused industrial line between Hay St Ultimo and Lilyfield was incorporated into a light rail line that extended through Haymarket to connect to Central Station.

The light rail has been extended to Dulwich Hill and is known as the Sydney Light Rail L1 Dulwich Hill Line. A trip on the light rail and an exploration around some of its stops , especially around John St Square in Pyrmont, where there are some deep stone cuttings, is worthwhile for those interested in railway heritage.

Future developments may include an extension to the disused Regent St railway station, using the rail tunnel beneath Railway Square.

Rail line history 

The Goods Line is a short section of a former industrial railway that connected Sydney Yard and the Sydney-Parramatta railway line to the port of Darling Harbour. The line opened in 1855 and was extended to Dulwich Hill in 1922, providing a way for freight trains to reach Darling Harbour without interfering with passenger trains. Cargoes included wheat and wool. 

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Running 154 km from Moree to Inverell, it has the potential to be one of the longest rail trails in NSW
  • Scenic, undulating landscapes close to Inverell
  • The original branch line was built for steam trains and follows a circuitous course through the hills – ideal  for a rail trail

Attractions

  • Moree Artesian Aquatic Centre
  • Historic buildings and museums
  • Kaputar National Park nearby
  • National Transport Museum at Inverell
  • Inverell Pioneer Village
  • Sapphire fossicking
  • Fishing at nearby Copeton Dam

Trail Guide

NOTE: This rail trail is not yet open. It is one of 17 potential Rail Trails in NSW

The Inverell railway line is a closed railway line in New South Wales, Australia. The line branches from Moree, and travels east through farming countryside and the small towns of Gravesend and Warialda Rail, gradually rising through Delungra toward the terminus at Inverell. Several silos, stock loading facilities and associated sidings can still be seen along the old alignment.

Section Guides

 

Moree to Bininguy (40 km)

Bininguy to Gravesend (16 km)

Gravesend to Warialda Rail (23 km)

Warialda Rail to Delungra (36 km)

Delungra to Inverell (40 km)

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Kamilaroi people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail will be built.

Development and future of the rail trail

As of June 2021 there is no active committee trying to lobby for the construction of a rail trail on this disused corridor.  Rail Trails Australia views this as a viable potential rail trail, and would be keen to support any person or group to lobby for its construction.

If you are interested, contact us at nsw@railtrails.org.au

Rail Line History

Construction of the 154km line from Moree began in July 1898, and around 300 people were employed using horses and drays and a huge plough. A gang of 40 men cleared timber, and earthworks were made by horse-drawn scoops.

Travelling time for passengers between Sydney and Inverell by rail in 1904 was more than 24 hours.

Passenger services between Inverell and Moree ended in 1983. The final train from Inverell yard ran in June 1987, and the line beyond Delungra was decommissioned on 2 December 1987. In August 1991, the line was further truncated to Biniguy, with the final section closed on 14 June 1994, and the line listed as out of use beyond a short siding from the junction with the Mungindi line, just south of Moree station. The bridge across the Gwydir River near Gravesend was heritage listed in 1999.

Following the closure of the line in 1987, the Inverell station building was relocated to Inverell Pioneer Village.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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