Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • The Goods Line offers a refuge from the busy Sydney CBD. It is a linear park and green space with public seating, performance areas, lawns, table tennis tables and items of railway heritage, and has won many design awards

Attractions

  • The Goods Line passes the University of Technology (UTS) campus, ABC studios, Ian Thorpe Aquatic Centre, Darling Harbour and the Powerhouse Museum

Trail Guide

Stage 1 of the Goods Line can be reached from Central Railway Station’s Devonshire St pedestrian tunnel in the south, and at various points along its route to the Powerhouse Museum in the north. There are displays and relics along the route that showcase railway heritage, including Ultimo Rd’s heritage railway bridge.

The Line can be ridden, but for such a short length with so many features, a slow stroll is better.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Gadigal people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

The port facilities at Darling Harbour closed and the precinct was extensively redeveloped in the 1980s. The disused industrial line between Hay St Ultimo and Lilyfield was incorporated into a light rail line that extended through Haymarket to connect to Central Station.

The light rail has been extended to Dulwich Hill and is known as the Sydney Light Rail L1 Dulwich Hill Line. A trip on the light rail and an exploration around some of its stops , especially around John St Square in Pyrmont, where there are some deep stone cuttings, is worthwhile for those interested in railway heritage.

Future developments may include an extension to the disused Regent St railway station, using the rail tunnel beneath Railway Square.

Rail line history 

The Goods Line is a short section of a former industrial railway that connected Sydney Yard and the Sydney-Parramatta railway line to the port of Darling Harbour. The line opened in 1855 and was extended to Dulwich Hill in 1922, providing a way for freight trains to reach Darling Harbour without interfering with passenger trains. Cargoes included wheat and wool. 

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • A short trail for all the family that follows the tram line from Adelaide to the coastal beach area of Glenelg
  • The trail moves through suburban Adelaide but avoids most main roads and busy areas. 
  • Main road crossings are controlled by traffic lights
  • Interesting artwork
  • Flat with the exception of street overpasses that are easy to climb
  • Adelaide’s busiest cycle route; as used as a commuter route in mornings and evenings 

Attractions

  • Starts in Adelaide’s parklands and ends on coastal beaches
  • Beachside suburb of Glenelg has a great range of eateries
  • 8 km from Adelaide CBD the trail intersects with the Sturt River Linear Park Trail,  which heads south to for 12 km to link with the Patrick Jonker Veloway
  • At the junction with the Sturt River Linear Park Trail you can travel north over Anzac Highway to join the Westside Rail Trail, which leads back to Adelaide CBD
  • Ends at Glenelg Beach, where it joins the coast park, a 28 km trail along Adelaide’s beach frontage

Trail Guide

Overall description

The trail has two sections and crosses several busy roads, either through controlled crossings or by overpasses. It is an enjoyable ride that links cyclists with several other trails and ultimately with Adelaide’s coastline.

Section Guides

South Terrace (Adelaide Parklands) to South Road Overpass (4km)

  • From South Tce the trail runs between the tram line and Peacock Rd to Greenhill Rd; crossed at traffic lights to the western side of King William Rd
  • Continues on the footpath for a short distance before moving away from the road to following the tram line as a dedicated shared-use path.
  • The trail follows the tramline through to Goodwood Rd which can be crossed at the pedestrian crossing to Railway Tce
  • The 900 m section of the trail from Greenhill Rd to Musgrave St is being upgraded and widened 
  • The trail follows Railway Tce until it turns left and becomes Devon St;   turn right and ride through the tunnel beneath the tram overpass, then turn immediately left and ride a short distance to the end of the street where you turn right and walk your bike to the Railway Station subway beneath the train line to the reserve. Turn left to the tram overpass and veer right, following the path to Ethel St/Norman Tce to the pedestrian crossing on Leah St.
  • The trail is then a well-defined shared use path along the edge of the tram line. After a short distance, the South Rd overpass provides good views of the city

 

South Road Overpass to Brighton Road, Glenelg ( 6km) 

  • About 500 m from the South Rd overpass, cross the tram line at the pedestrian crossing at stop 7 Glandore. Walk your bike and look out for trams
  • The trail continues as a shared-use path to the pedestrian crossing on Marion Rd and the pedestrian crossing at Cross Rd.. Watch out for the ‘bike chain people’ artwork
  • Over the Morphett Rd pedestrian crossing point you will see the Sturt River concrete channel. On the other side of this the path continues along the tram line but there is also a bike path to the right that takes cyclists over the tram line to Anzac Highway and then on to the Westside Rail Trail back to the city. The bike path on the left is the 12 km Sturt River Cycle Path, which extends to the Southern Expressway and the Patrick Jonker Veloway
  • Continue on the shared use path as it follows the tram line to Glenelg. Watch out for the giraffe beside the path!
  • The trail ends at Brighton Rd, where you use the pedestrian crossing to continue along Jetty Rd to the beach or, if Jetty Rd is too busy, Augusta St 200m to the north.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Kaurna people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

 

Development and future of the rail trail 

The trail is continually being redeveloped and refined. The most recent works involve the reconstruction of a 900 m section of the trail from South Tce (City Parklands edge) southward along the tram line.

Future planned works involve a cycle and pedestrian overpass above Goodwood Railway Station, expected to begin in 2021-22.

 

Railway history 

In August 1873 the Adelaide, Glenelg and Suburban Railway Company opened a line between Adelaide and Glenelg, on the route of the present tramway.

In May 1880, the private company ‘Holdfast Railway Company opened the Holdfast Bay Line from Adelaide Railway Station to Glenelg. The two rail lines ran parallel with each other, separated by a few suburbs. Both lines were soon in financial trouble and merged to form the Glenelg Railway Company on 11 May 1882.

The two lines were now almost viable as they were able to rationalise and share rolling stock.

In December 1899, the ‘Glenelg Railway Company’ was acquired by the South Australian Railways, which continued to operate the Adelaide to Glenelg line as a steam railway until 1929 when the tracks were rebuilt and electrified for tram operation. The Adelaide Railway Station to Glenelg line was removed in 1929.

Growth in the number of buses resulted in a decline in patronage and growing losses for the tram line. By the 1950s Adelaide’s network of trams had disappeared with the exception of the Adelaide to Glenelg line, primarily due to the line being constructed on its own rail reserve, providing faster travelling times and minimal interference with road traffic.

The Adelaide to Glenelg tram is operational today and the Adelaide tram network is beginning to grow again.

 

Naming of the Trail

The Mike Turtur Trail was named after local cyclist Michael Turtur, who competed in the Olympic Games and three Commonwealth Games, winning a total of five medals. He was race director for the Tour Down Under from inception in 1999 to 2020 and in In 2018 Mr Turtur was made an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) for distinguished service to cycling, particularly through the development and promotion of world-class road cycling events, and to the community of South Australia.

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Mike Turtur Bikeway in South Australia receives a $28m boost to improve safety

Posted: 06/07/21

The State Government has announced that a bridge for cyclists and pedestrians will be constructed ...

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Mike Turtur Bikeway Rail Side Trail Upgrade (South Australia)

Posted: 16/10/20

South Australia's Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure in partnership with the City of Unley ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • an enjoyable flat ride from the City of Adelaide to the beachside suburbs
  • well landscaped with significant recreation facilities close to the trail
  • convenient and accessible, with ample parking
  • provides good access to the beachside suburb of Glenelg by connecting with the Mike Turtur Rail Trail
  • well constructed and maintained, and well lit at night for most of its length
  • crosses many streets, but most are quiet and occasional busy streets have controlled crossing points
 

Attractions

  • convenient for access to the Sturt River Linear Park Trail and Mike Turtur Rail Trail
  • recreation facilities, amenities and a cycle repair station on the trail
  • a few remaining pieces of rail infrastructure 
  • popular with walkers and cyclists while providing commuter access to the city 
  • links with Adelaide City Parklands cycle trails (see a link to parklands trail map  below)

Trail Guide

Overall description

The trail is divided into two sections; the first runs through inner metro areas and the second makes the most of a wider tree-lined rail corridor.

Section Guides

Adelaide to South Road (2 km)

  • starts at Mile End Railway Station close to where the Holdfast Bay railway met the existing tracks from Adelaide Railway Station on North Tce
  • runs besides busy James Congdon Dr,  the original alignment of the railway line
  • the path is off-road, elevated and tree-lined 
  • after passing the SA Athletics Stadium on the left, the trail swings to the right and crosses Railway Tce and then James Congdon Dr at the traffic lights. The path continues for a short distance before crossing Sir Donald Bradman Dr at the traffic lights
  • at the next set of traffic lights approaching South Rd, cross James Congdon Dr to the left, then turn right and proceed a short distance on the path to the pedestrian crossing and cross South Rd. The trail veers to the left; and once past the left turn slip lane you are on the Rail Trail

 

South Road to Anzac Highway (6 km)

  • River Torrens Linear Park shared use path – Adelaide CBD
  • follows the old railway line alignment and meanders along the landscaped rail reserve
  • a bike repair station near the corner of Moss Ave and Tennyson St
  • Wiegall Reserve on the left just past the Oval Tce roundabout has amenities and shelter
  • as you approach Marion Rd, look for the remains of Plympton station platform to the right. There is a shelter and a cairn here
  • Cross Marion Rd at the pedestrian crossing and continue southwest along the trail
  • Cross Morphett Rd and pass Immanuel Primary School on your right just before entering Camden Oval in Morphettville
  • follow the trail through the oval to a marked path beside Anzac Hwy. This is the last section of the original railway corridor; the remainder of the rail reserve has been used for housing and roadway
  • Cross Anzac Hwy at the pedestrian crossing, turn right and then sharp left and follow the bike lane along the edge of the Sturt River culvert
  • cross the tram line and turn right on to Mike Turtur Bikeway – railside trail
  • Continue on the shared use path as it follows the tram line to Glenelg. Watch out for the giraffe beside the path
  • The trail ends at Brighton Rd where you can use the pedestrian crossing to continue along Jetty Rd to the beach or if Jetty Rd is too busy, use Augusta St 200 m north

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Kaurna people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

 

Development and future of the rail trail 

The trail has been fully developed, and links with the Adelaide City Parklands at its beginning and the River Sturt Linear Park Trail and Mike Turtur Rail Trail at its end. Council has continued to focus on developing and landscaping the wide railway corridor around the trail.

 

Railway history 

The first railway from Adelaide to Glenelg opened in 1873 by the Adelaide, Glenelg, and Suburban Railway Company and ran from South Tce. Holdfast Bay Railway Company opened a competing line from North Tce to Glenelg (the Westside Bikeway alignment) seven years later. The companies amalgamated a few months later, and operated the railways until 1929 when the SA Government Municipal Tramways Trust took over both lines.

The Government proposed that both lines be converted from steam trains to electric trams and on the day electrification of the South Tce to Glenelg line (Mike Turtur Bikeway) was completed, the North Tce to Glenelg line (Westside Bikeway) closed. Minor works had been completed on the electrification of the North Tce to Glenelg line, but the onset of the Depression put an end to work and to the train line’s future. The South Tce to Glenelg line still operates as a tram line today. The two independent lines operated adjacent to each other, often at a loss, but today the lines support rail trails that join together halfway between Adelaide and Glenelg.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • On-road and along a bike path through a linear park
  • A pleasant ride past Hawthorn’s pretty houses and gardens

Trail Guide

This short trail follows a branch line from Hawthorn to Kew.

On road and bike path through linear park.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Woiworung people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Rail line history 

This short trail follows a branch line from Hawthorn to Kew that opened in 1887 and closed in 1957.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • A high standard rail trail with detailed history boards at former station site, which winds through a variety of suburbs and urban parkland.
  • Between East Camberwell and Alamein it runs beside the Alamein railway line. There are many busy road crossings, but most have lights.
  • It is possible to access many sections of the rail trail with public transport.

Attractions

  • A well developed trail with informative history boards at most former station sites, winds through a variety of suburbs and urban parkland.
  • From Kew to East Malvern it is also known as the Anniversary Trail.

Trail Guide

This is a well developed trail with detailed history boards, which winds through a variety of suburbs and urban parkland. From Fairfield to East Malvern it is known as the Anniversary Trail. Between East Camberwell and Alamein it runs beside the Alamein railway line. There are many busy road crossings, but most have lights.

Options

You can cycle from Kew to Elsternwick by combining the Outer Circle and Rosstown rail trails. Total distance: 25k

Section Guides

This description describes the trail heading south to north.

From East Malvern to Kew it is also known as the Anniversary Trail.

Hughesdale to East Malvern (2km)

The trail begins at the impressive Hughesdale Station on the Dandenong railway line and the Djerring Track beneath the “Sky Rail”. You can also join in nearby Boyd Park, very popular.

At six-lane Dandenong Road, it is safest to follow the service lane to the west for 200m to cross at the lights. Then turn north again, and enter the Urban Forest, once the site of the Waverley Road Station. This is a beautiful native bushland park with several trails running in parallel. Follow any of these to arrive at Waverley Road. This is the only unsealed section of the trail. Cross the road, and pass through East Malvern Station carpark. The trail meets the Scotchman’s Creek Trail here, which you could follow to your right all the way to Jells Park.

East Malvern to East Camberwell / Canterbury (7km)

Use the pedestrian and cyclist overpass bridge to cross the Glen Waverly Railway line and the Monash freeway. The trail runs through Malvern Valley Public Golf Course.

Stick carefully to the trail and at the golfing tee-offs, head north to cross Gardiners Creek and get back on the original alignment (the Gardiners Creek Trail keeps heading west). Once a long timber rail bridge crossed Gardiners Creek at this point.

The trail is now known as the Anniversary Trail and very picturesque until Alamein railway station. There are the old railway catenary poles still carrying electrical wires overhead although there were never any electric trains in this section!

From Alamein station the trail is beside the Alamein railway line. At several intersections, cars must give way to pedestrians and cyclists – but keep a look out anyway.

The shops at High Street are a good place to stop for a coffee. Soon after is a steady climb, with the trail running up the side of the train line’s cutting. The next crossing, Toorak Road, can be very busy, and has an extremely steep (but fortunately short) hill on the far side. Things then get easier as the trail winds its way past the Hartwell, Willison and Riversdale stations. After Hartwell station the trail moves off the rail alignment and at Prospect Hill Road it winds around a hockey club, before passing under the Belgrave/Lilydale Line at East Camberwell station and turning northwest into Boorondara Park.

Canterbury to Kew (8km)

The trail is now a “proper” rail trail again, on the formation of the former railway. Shortly after passing under Canterbury Rd the trail is in a deep cutting for several kilometres – a somewhat hidden gem of tranquility buried in the eastern suburbs. This section is particularly busy before and after school so don’t expect tranquility at these times.

At High St. Kew, cross at the lights to your right, to get through busy Harp Village junction. From here, it’s a long descent down to Chandler Highway with the former formation to the left.

The formation and Anniversary Trail ends at the Eastern Freeway but there is a bike path to continue over the freeway on to the Yarra River, albeit narrow and noisy.

It is worth it though as this is the connection with the Main Yarra Trail and the Yarra River bridge which is a real feature. The railway bridge was converted to a two land road bridge when the railway closed and was one of Melbourne’s most congested roads until 2020 when a new six lane road bridge opened to the south and the former railway bridge became the rail trail bridge with many interesting features including portholes to the river below.

Between the Yarra River and Heidleberg Road is the former Australian Paper Mills site where a lot of urban renewal development is underway so the view here will change regularly.

North of Heidelberg Road, the rail corridor curve to the west. It has not been developed, and remains as vacant land. There is a short section of path to Fairfield Station on the Hurstbridge Line.

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Woiworung people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Railway history

In the late 1880s land boom, a railway line was built through the then outer eastern suburbs. It was also supposed to link the Gippsland line with Spencer Street (now Southern Cross) station prior to the construction of the viaduct between Flinders and Spencer Street stations.

The line was opened in 1890. It operated in its entirety for only three years, being closed in stages between 1893 and 1895 as a result of the depression. The southern section was reopened as far as Ashburton in 1898 and was extended to Alamein in 1948. The section from East Camberwell to East Kew was reopened in 1900. The passenger service on this section was known as the Deepdene Dasher and was provided by a steam locomotive and two carriages. It was withdrawn in 1943.

The City of Boroondara offers a very comprehensive history of the Outer Circle Railway here.

A more recent history of this railway is in a City of Glen Eira news item (Nov 2020).

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Pedestrian Bridge Over Gardiner’s Creek Re-opened

Posted: 24/06/07

The pedestrian bridge across Gardiner's Creek on the Outer Circle Rail Trail has been closed ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
The former Webb Dock Railway Bridge has been converted for use by pedestrians and cyclists.  

Trail Guide

The bridge runs parallel with the Charles Grimes road bridge and provides a connection over the Yarra between Docklands and South Bank.

Something to combine with all the other paths and attractions in the area.

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Woiworung people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Railway history

The line was only open from 1986 to 1996 and some of the line remains in place up at the Lorimer St. end. The bridge shape was changed considerably of course to fit in with the area, especially the aboriginal “fishing net” shape on the Yarra’s Edge side, when it was opened in 2003.

A proposal (first raised in March 2014) to develop the unused rail corridor along Lorimer St, down Todd Rd, through Westgate Park and along the south side of the Westgate Freeway is dependent on decisions involving the future redevelopment of Fishermans Bend.

The Victorian Government released a future vision for the suburb in 2017 that will entail new public transport and cycling routes.

It is expected that once the sites for new underground rail stations as part of Melbourne Metro Two are decided, detailed planning for the rest of the transport network will proceed.

The repurposing of the old rail corridor remains an exciting opportunity for the development of an attractive urban rail trail.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
Short and easy ride or walk from Melbourne city to Port Melbourne. The railway has been converted to a light rail carrying trams.

Attractions

Historic Station Pier

Trail Guide

The trail follows the route of Australia’s first steam railway from Port Melbourne (Sandridge) to Flinders Street Station

Section Guides

Start at the Elizabeth St end of Flinders Street Station. The pedestrian subway leads to the north bank of the Yarra River, where a promenade leads along the bank to former Sandridge railway bridge, which once carried the railway over the Yarra. It is now converted for pedestrian use.

Cross the river and continue along the south bank to Clarendon St/Spencer St.

Turn left and follow Clarendon St. to Normanby St.

Here a shared path starts following the light railway to Port Melbourne.

For much of the route, this path runs through pleasant parkland.

The path finishes at the old Port Melbourne Station.

From here you can walk on to historic Station Pier.

Background Information

The railway was opened 1854 to connect the city to its port.

In the 1940s displaced persons were carried by train direct from Station Pier to Bonegilla Station, now part of the High Country Rail Trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
Part of the Capital City Trail. There are lots of cafes nearby as well as Yarra Bend Park. All major road crossings have traffic signals. Many connections with public transport.

Attractions

A high standard rail trail traversing Melbourne’s inner suburbs. Traverses parkland and quite a few railway heritage structures remain.

Very popular with local residents.

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Woiworung people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Railway history

The Inner Circle was opened in 1888 with three stations: North Carlton and North Fitzroy on the main line, and Fitzroy at the end of a short branch line leading south through the Edinburgh Gardens from a junction near North Fitzroy station.  The Inner Circle Line was a steam era suburban railway line that was later electrified.

In 1948 the Inner Circle line was closed to passenger traffic, and was used exclusively for freight trains. The line was officially closed in 1981, and shortly after the rails were removed, and  the rail reserve became a linear park which provides part of the Capital City Trail for cyclists, connecting the Merri Creek Trail to the Moonee Ponds Creek Trail in the network of shared use bicycle paths. Some signals and parts of level crossing gates also survive, with remaining overhead stanchions still carrying railway electric current between the Upfield and Mernda railway lines.

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