Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Runs through significant Parks Victoria native forest and prime West Gippsland agricultural high country
  • A good all-season rail trail with many points of interest, scenic views and facilities along the way
  • Refreshments and accommodation at Neerim South
  • History boards with trail information at various points along the trail

Attractions

  • Travels through the 360 ha Crossover Regional Park operated by Parks Victoria, then on a road reserve to Neerim
  • Mountain grey gums standing straight and tall and ferny valleys
  • Wombats, spiny anteaters and wallabies, sambar deer and birds including black-faced monarchs, olive whistlers Superb lyrebirds
  • 22 km of mountain bike trails in the Crossover Regional Park adjoining the Rail Trail

Trail Guide

This trail is in two parts, separated by a short diversion through Rokeby.  It is part of the Warragul to Noojee branch line which is also home of the impressive Noojee Trestle Bridge Rail Trail.

There are emergency marker points and seating along the trail. In an emergency, call 000 and quote the emergency marker code where you are located

This remarkable countryside of tall timber, rolling hills and scenic views is only a short drive from the eastern suburbs of Melbourne.

Section Guides

Rokeby Fauna and Flora Reserve to Brandy Creek Rd (1.5 km)

  • Accessible from Old Telegraph Rd West, which also enters the Fauna and Flora Reserve established in the 1960s
  • Endangered native plants
  • A branch trail along this section leads to the Tarago River picnic area, a grassed area with a picnic table, seats and good fishing

Rokeby to Crossover (through Crossover Regional Park to trestle bridge) (4km)

  • Accessible from the carpark on Lavinia St on the edge of Crossover Regional Park
  • Climbs on a 1 in 40 grade through the forest to Crossover, the steepest continuous grade on rail line between Warragul and Noojee
  • At the Crossover end of this section is the Heritage listed Crossover trestle bridge, built by the railway contractor in 1891 as a road bridge for traffic to pass above the deep cutting and railway line

Crossover to Neerim (10km)

  • The trail departs from the rail alignment and follows the road reserve to Neerim South
  • The main street of Neerim south has the former railway station’s turntable cone on display
  • Neerim South has shops, cafes and accommodation
  • Joins the old rail line about 2 km north of Neerim South at a spectacular mountain lookout in Apex Park
  • Ends in the little town of Neerim

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Kurnai people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail

Baw Baw Shire is planning to extend the trail to include the Noojee trestle bridge to Noojee Station Museum rail trail.

Railway history

The Noojee line was opened in sections from 1890 to 1919 and closed between 1954 and 1958. Many sections have since been sold off.

The railway was built in 1890-91 as part of a Victorian Government plan to open access to regional Victoria. It was a branch line from Warragul to Neerim south for passengers, timber and agricultural equipment and produce. In 1917-19 the railway line was extended to Noojee, but in 1926 bushfires around Noojee burned out bridges and a large amount of line. The railway also sustained huge losses in the 1939 Black Friday bushfires,. By the 1950s the railway was finding it hard to compete with road transport and began closing in stages, until it finally closed in 1958.

Since the rail closure, the Crossover bridge has been in gentle decline due to neglect and lack of maintenance. Many of the decking timbers are rotting, yet many of the uprights appear strong and stable. The bridge has considerable artistic, engineering and tourist merit. One fascinating aspect is the picket style safety railing. There is also the depth of the fern lined, steep cutting below, along which the trains laboured.

This old timber bridge at Crossover was reportedly constructed in 1892 as part of the Warragul to Noojee rail link. In 1958 that rail line closed after decades of transporting timber, farm produce, local passengers and occasional tourists. This bridge is supported by six tall trestles and spans about forty metres of ferny cuttings.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Diverse scenery and easy public transport access in Traralgon
  • Fun activities for children in Stratford, with a skate park and exercise equipment
  • The Long Bridge over the Latrobe River
  • The trail surface is smooth gravel, though it can be soft in some newer sections when wet

Attractions

  • This trail passes through generally flat dairy farm country with views of the Great Dividing Range
  • Access by train from Melbourne at Stratford or Traralgon, making it possible to ride one way and return by train

Trail Guide

Access Points

  • Stratford – Apex Park by the Avon River
  • Maffra – Macalister River Park. A trail joins the rail trail beside the Macalister River Rd bridge
  • Tinamba – Maffra-Rosedale road
  • Heyfield – Heyfield Wetlands Centre on western edge of town
  • Cowwarr – 50 m west of town on the Traralgon-Maffra road
  • Toongabbie – Corner of Stringer Rd and Traralgon-Maffra road
  • Glengarry – old railway station, opposite hotel 200 m along Main St.
  • Traralgon – east side of Maffra Rd near Marshalls Rd intersection

Section Guides

Stratford to Maffra (10 km)

  • The trail begins in Apex Park and runs beneath Princes Hwy to a shared path beside the highway until it reaches the main railway line
  • The trail then continues alongside the working rail line until the old branch line
  • The trail crosses the Maffra-Stratford Road and up a steep ramp on to the original railway embankment on the south side of the road
  • The trailhead at Maffra is at the Gippsland Vehicle Collection
  • Continue on to the main street (Johnson Street) and through the CBD

Stratford is a small town with basic visitors’ facilities, including cafes and restaurants.

Maffra is a regional centre with facilities including cafes and restaurants.

Maffra to Tinamba (8 km)

  • Leaving Maffra, the trail rejoins Johnson St at the Macalister River Bridge
  • The trail passes through a delightful wetland and forest on the way to Tinamba
  • The trail has an excellent surface and crosses several restored creek crossings
  • Tinamba is a small town with a cafe and restaurant

Tinamba to Heyfield (9.5 km)

  • From Tinamba the trail extends on an excellent gravel surface for 3 km to McKinnons Rd
  • The next 6.5 km to Heyfield are on a rougher surface but suitable for hybrid bikes

Heyfield to Cowwarr (11 km)

A section of trail is closed from the Heyfield-Cowwarr road to the Dawson-Seaton road because there is no bridge over the Thompson River between these roads. A 5 km on-road section on quiet roads bypasses the area. Funds have been received from the Victorian Government to reinstall the bridge and complete track work to open this final section of the trail. Works are expected to be completed in 2021.

  • On the western side of Heyfield the trail travels several hundred metres down quiet Racecourse Rd then over the Heyfield-Seaton road toward Dawson. The former Dawson railway siding is now a flora reserve
  • The trail continues on Dawson Rd until the intersection with the Cowwarr-Seaton road, then turns left on to the Cowwarr-Seaton road and left again at the next T-intersection into Cowwarr-Heyfield road
  • Continue on Cowwarr-Heyfield road for less than 1 km before turning left to rejoin the trail
  • The trail crosses Rainbow Creek and continues a short distance into Cowwarr, where there is a hotel, general store and cafe.

Cowwarr to Toongabbie (9 km)

This section features peaceful, car-free riding through dairy country.

  • At Cowwarr, the station platform can be seen 150m along the trail. Several original bridges remain in place
  • Dismount to get through some steel gates as the trail continues southwest toward Toongabbie
  • About 6 km from Cowwarr the path crosses a deep gorge with stone walls and steel barricades. These barriers were installed in the 1950s to slow down the erosive effects of Fells Creek

Toongabbie to Glengarry (9 km)

This section is fully developed.

  • Toongabbie is a small town with only one store, refer Sponsored Links below.
  • The trail continues south to Glengarry through a high-quality patch of remnant native grassland, with wildflowers in spring
  • There is a low-level crossing across Eaglehawk Creek
  • This section finishes at the old Glengarry Railway Station, the only public building remaining on the rail trail. It includes the station platform, toilet and a small goods shed
  • A loading crane in the station precinct was moved from Rosedale Station after the original was removed at the end of rail services. The crane was. used to load goods for Melbourne
  • Glengarry is a small town with a general store, bakery, hotel, and BBQ area with a playground

Glengarry to Traralgon (10 km)

The newest section includes an impressively long embankment and four bridges across the Latrobe River and its floodplain. The bridges use the old bridge trusses and pylons, with new handrails and walkway structures across them.

  • Picturesque views across the Latrobe floodplain and adjoining farmland
  • There is a rail trail car park at Burnetts Rd, 2 km north of Princes Hwy. Some maps may not include Burnetts Rd; look for the brown Vineyard sign
  • The trail finishes at Marshalls Rd 500 m before Princes Hwy
  • Traralgon is a large regional town serving the Latrobe Valley. It has a shopping plaza, fast food outlets and accommodation

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Gunaikurnai people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built

Rail Line History

The line from Traralgon to Stratford via Maffra was built in 1883 and served as an alternative route to East Gippsland. It was busy until the 1950s carrying sugar beet from Maffra and timber from Heyfield. In its later years, the main purpose of the line was to serve the dairy industry in the Maffra area. The line closed in stages; from Traralgon to Cowwarr in 1986, then Cowwarr to Maffra in 1994. The rails were removed shortly afterward.

The first section of the rail trail opened in 2005 and it was fully opened in 2014, except for a diversion between Cowwarr and Dawson.

V-Line runs passenger train services from Melbourne to Bairnsdale via Traralgon, Sale and Stratford.

 

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Gippsland Plains Rail Trail (Vic) Fully Open

Posted: 12/05/14

The Gippsland Plains Rail Trail (GPRT) celebrated the opening of its final section from Traralgon ...

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Opening of Gippsland Plains Rail Trail (Vic)

Posted: 30/04/14

The Gippsland Plains Rail Trail (GPRT) is celebrating the opening of its final section from ...

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Gippsland Plains RT Receives Funding For Completion (VIC)

Posted: 30/10/13

Media release The Hon Peter Ryan MP Deputy Premier Minister for State Development Minister for ...

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Funding for the Gippsland Plains Rail Trail

Posted: 04/06/13

Victorian Deputy Premier Peter Ryan, announced that $105,000 from RDV would be provided to Wellington Council ...

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Surface upgrade on Gippsland Plains Rail Trail

Posted: 01/04/13

The newly upgraded surface on the Gippsland Plains Rail Trail from Glengarry to Cowwarr has ...

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More Funding for the Gippsland Plains Rail Trail (VIC)

Posted: 19/10/12

Media Release: Wednesday 17 October 2012 $200,000 FOR GIPPSLAND PLAINS RAIL TRAIL – STAGE 1 Member for Morwell Russell Northe ...

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Funding for Gippsland Plains Rail Trail (VIC)

Posted: 02/07/11

In May, State Member for Morwell, Russell Northe, announced an $800,000 State Government grant to help ...

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State Budget Delivers for Gippland Plains Rail Trail (VIC)

Posted: 06/05/11

The Baillieu/Ryan Coalition Government's inaugural budget has delivered on its election commitments to Victorian ...

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Opening of Gippsland Plains Rail Trail on October 1st

Posted: 12/09/05

Below is the contents of a flyer from the committee. Congratulations on all their hard ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Experience life as it was in historic Walhalla.
  • Once one of Australia's richest towns and home to over 4000 gold seekers, this sleepy mountainside town is now frozen in time and is home to only 20 residents.
  • Walk through the lovingly restored centre full of heritage buildings, try your hand at panning for gold, or take a tour of the surrounding area.
  • Revel in the history that followed the discovery of Cohen's Reef, a three-kilometre vein of gold running through Walhalla.
  • Learn about the tough lives of miners, pan for gold down at Stringers Creek, and then explore the old hotels, shops, school and churches built in the 19th century when the town was at its peak.
  • Take a ride on the Walhalla Goldfields Railway. Enjoy the vibrant autumn trees, the beautiful Stringers Creek Gorge and colourful spring wildflowers.
  • For something a little spookier, take a ghost tour at the old cemetery on the hill.

Attractions

  • A short rail trail in beautiful mountain countryside, featuring tall forests and the meandering Thomson River.
  • An old mining area with the historic village of Walhalla close by.
  • Ride the short tourist railway from Thomson to Walhalla
  • Walk or cycle through steep cuttings with many twists and turns along the old railway formation
  • Views of Thomson River

Trail Guide

Access points

  • At Erica, park at the recreation reserve. See the map for details; the trail can be hard to locate
  • Junction of Tyers-Walhalla Rd and Walhalla Rd
  • At Thomson, park at the restored railway station, then follow the small road between the station and the river. Follow the track at the end of the railway yard and climb steeply to the old railway formation.

Section Guides

Erica to Thomson (7 km)

Note: the section between Platina Station and Thomson Station is currently closed following a landslide

  • From Erica, follow Station Rd past the caravan park on the former station site
  • Cross the low-level bridge over Jacobs Creek and proceed to a cutting surrounded by mountain ash
  • After 1.5km at Knotts Cutting (now filled in), follow the steep track to cross the Walhalla-Tyers road and rejoin the trail
  • Follow the twists and turns alongside Nelson Creek to the horseshoe bend. This bend is so sharp that passengers at the back of the train would see the locomotive travelling in the opposite direction.
  • A replica station has been built at Platina.  After passing beneath a road bridge there are great views of the Thomson River valley

Note: Just before Thomson, detour around the site of two trestle bridges. You may need to dismount 

Note: at the site of one of the missing bridges about 1 km before Thompson, there is a steep drop-off on a sharp bend with no warning signs or safety fence.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Kurnai people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Rail Line History

Gold was discovered at Walhalla in 1863, and created an impetus to build a railway.  A campaign started in the 1880’s, but it wasn’t until 1910 that a narrow gauge line was built from Moe to Walhalla.  However by the time the line was finished, the gold had started to peter out, and the miners used the railway to leave the area.  The line was closed in stages, and the final section from Moe to Erica was closed in 1954.  The wonderful concrete and steel bridge at Thomson was almost used by the army for demolition training, but a campaign by the Walhalla Goldfields Railway group finally succeeded in overturning that decision.  The railway is open between Thomson and Walhalla with a collection of completely restored rolling stock, and bikes can be carried on board.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • The trail traverses open countryside and bushy areas and features views of Lake Narracan, the Haunted Hills and Yallourn Power Station.
  • The trail passes the Moe Botanic Gardens and crosses Narracan Creek, both have access ramps from the trail. After crossing the creek flats the route passes Newborough.
  • A detour at Sullivans Track to Lake Narracan is well worthwhile, for a picnic or BBQ lunch or a swim.
  • The trail finishes at John Field Drive near the Yallourn Power Station.
  • The Moe to Yallourn Trail is excellent for family day trips at Lake Narracan and can also be combined with a scenic drive past the power station and open cut mines.

Attractions

  • A short, flat trail with some farmland and lake views
  • The imposing Yallourn power station provides interest at the end of the trail
  • Wildflowers abound in spring
  • Accommodation and restaurants in Moe

Trail Guide

Access Points

  • Moe – Bennett St on a gravel driveway on the east side
  • Yallourn – Yallourn Power Station, Eastern Rd

Options

  • Lake Narracan is a good picnic spot and a feature of the walk or ride

The large concrete blocks beside the trail were bases for the overhead catenary poles, as this was an electrified line.

Note: Recent works along the trail have resulted in some sections with a rough stony surface that needs to be taken slowly on a bike. Vehicular access near the power station end has also caused some unevenness of the trail.

Section Guides

Moe to Yallourn (8.5km)

  • From Bennett St the trail passes the Moe Botanical Gardens and crosses the Narracan Ck
  • Detour at Sullivans Track to gain access to the lake, and you can loop around following the lakeside, then back to the trail.
  • Continue to Pettits Track to join Field Drive
  • The trail finishes at the park on Eastern Rd just outside the power station
  • Option to return to Moe via John Field Drive

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Boonwurrung people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Rail Line History

The railway from Moe to Yallourn was constructed in the 1950’s to replace the original branch line, which joined the main line between Moe and Morwell.  The new line meant that heavy coal trains didn’t have to climb through the Haunted Hills.  The new line was subsequently closed in 1986, when briquette production was moved to Morwell.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • A very pleasant trail, travelling through hilly forest in the heart of Gippsland, that traverses beautiful mountain countryside with a gentle climb from Boolarra to Mirboo North
  • A good rail trail for walkers - three hours out, lunch and three hours back

Attractions

  • Flora reserves, bird life and wildlife
  • Boutique brewery and colourful murals at Mirboo North
  • Bakery and other shops in both Mirboo North and Boolarra
  • Boolarra Railway Park has a picnic area and playground with BBQ, toilets and shop nearby
  • 1800s brick culverts
  • Mosses, lichens, and toadstools
  • Ferny ‘The Meadows’ shelter built by volunteers

Trail Guide

Access points

  • Boolarra Railway Park, near the general store/café, shelter
  • Just behind the Grand Ridge Brewery and Restaurant in Mirboo North
  • Old Darlimurla station

Section Guides

Boolarra to Mirboo North (13 km)

  • From Boolarra, the trail begins a 275 m ascent. Look for the historically significant brick drainage culverts under the trail
  • The two arch bridges are on the original gradient are a feature; they replace difficult to access low level bridges burnt out in the 2009 bushfires
  • Midway between Boolarra and Mirboo North is Darlimurla station site, with a shelter, interpretive signage and an exercise station. Nearby is the Big Tree, an example of the exceptionally large trees that used to be in the area. It was 61 m tall until it was damaged in the 2009 bushfires
  • The trail continues with a steady climb to Mirboo North. This part of the trail has now rebounded magnificently from the damage caused by the bushfires
  • The trail finishes behind the Grand Ridge Brewery after passing over some massive embankments
  • The township of Mirboo North, with cafes and shops, is a few hundred metres along through the park
  • Mirboo North railway station is now a community centre and children’s playgroup. Close by is a playground where younger trail users can entertain themselves

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Boonwurrung people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Rail Line History

This trail follows the former branch line from Morwell to Mirboo North, which opened in 1885.

South of Boolarra, the hilly country required many large cuttings, embankments and bridges. All were constructed by hand and apparently sent the initial contractor into financial hardship.

The railway carried timber, dairy produce, and passengers in its later years. A rail motor service began after WW II and continued until the line closed in 1974.

The rail trail opened in the late 1990s and was effectively closed for some time following the Grand Ridge bushfires of February 2009. With help from the ‘Wednesday Warriors’ volunteers, the trail is now always in good condition even though almost entirely in forest.

 

 

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Grand Ridge Rail Trail Gets New Bridges (VIC)

Posted: 02/07/11

A new bridge is installed on the Grand Ridge ...

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Works underway for Grand Ridge Rail Trail (VIC)

Posted: 06/05/11

Two local companies are constructing two bridges for the ...

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Grand Ridge Rail Trail (Vic) Closed Due to Bushfire Damage

Posted: 07/02/09

As a severe bushfire at the start of February has burnt out two major bridges ...

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Report on Mirboo North Annual Ride

Posted: 17/05/00

Around 40 cyclists took part in the annual ride between Boolarra and Mirboo North this year. ...

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Mirboo North Annual Ride

Posted: 12/04/00

The annual 28km ride along the Mirboo North Rail Trail will take place on Sunday 7 ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Sometimes called the Mississippi Trail
  • This trail follows an old tramway along the Mississippi Creek bed on this linking trail.
  • The Gippsland Lakes Discovery Trail is your connection between the East Gippsland Rail Trail and the oceanside town of Lakes Entrance.
  • Hear the bellbirds calling and see the native wildflowers blooming in Spring.
  • An old marble quarry makes for a perfect morning tea stop as you are encompassed by shrubby lined trails meandering through the bush landscape.

Attractions

  • Provides a link from the East Gippsland Rail Trail and Lakes Entrance
  • Lovely bush trail that follows an old tramway along Mississippi Creek
  • Remains of old cuttings, including rail and sleepers
  • Remains of old marble quarry

Trail Guide

Access points

  • Colquhoun – junction of East Gippsland Rail Trail and Seaton Track
  • Log Crossing Picnic area – on Log Crossing Rd
  • Lakes Entrance
  • Junction of Scriveners Rd and Colquhoun Rd, 8 km north of Lakes Entrance

Section Guides

Note: Steep rough hills, isolated locations, uncontrolled road crossings, irregular maintenance

  • After leaving the East Gippsland rail trail, follow the trail south. This part has some steep sections
  • After 4km you reach the site of the old marble quarry.  There is a viewing platform and signage at this point
  • The trail follows the old tramway for the next 9km.  It mainly follows the Mississippi Creek, crossing it several times
  • You can stop at Log Crossing picnic area.  There are toilets and picnic facilities at this point
  • The tramway trail finishes when you reach Scriveners Road.  Turn left and follow Scriveners Rd until you reach Lakes Colquhoun Rd.
  • Turn right at Lakes Colquhoun Rd, and follow for 8km to reach Lakes Entrance

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Gunaikurnai people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Rail Line History

The Gippsland Lakes Discovery Trail follows the route of a tramway that was constructed in the early 1900s to move pink granite from a quarry on Mississippi Creek, to the North Arm of the Gippsland Lakes. The granite was used for buildings in Melbourne and also to construct a new permanent entrance to the Gippsland Lakes. The tramline was used until the 1940s.

 

No services listed for this rail trail.

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