Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Good climate most of the year
  • This is a short trail mainly through state forest
  • Imbil is well situated with food and accommodation options
  • Imbil Railway Station is well preserved
  • Suitable for a long walk, or a short out and back ride

Attractions

  • Scenic rural countryside
  • Imbil has a substantial railway bridge over Yabba Creek
  • Railway history and heritage
  • The Mary Valley Rattler train runs on Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday between Gympie and Amamoor (13 km north of Imbil)

Trail Guide

The 4.5 km open section of the trail runs through the towns of Imbil and Brooloo.

Most of the rail trail passes through State forest; there are bellbirds along the trail as well as many other native animals.

  • The access at Imbil is via William St (limited parking)
  • The access at Brooloo via Sutton St
  • Toilets and drinking water at Imbil
  • A few gates to open and close

Section Guides

Imbil to Brooloo (4.5 km)

  • cafes, hotel, fuel, caravan park, motel
  • no toilets or drinking water at Brooloo

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Gubbi Gubbi people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Development and future of the trail

The rail trail was developed by Gympie Regional Council.

It is hoped to see the Mary Valley Rail Trail extended from Imbil to Amamoor, adding around 16 km to the trail. Gympie Regional Council has earmarked the extended trail as the key catalyst project for the Mary Valley in its 2019-24 Tourism Strategy, and is applying for funding to carry out a Feasibility Study.

Railway history

The Mary Valley line was a branch line of the North Coast railway line, which branched just south of Gympie and continued to Brooloo in the upper Mary Valley.

It was built between 1911 and 1915 to facilitate closer settlement of the Mary River Valley and reached the terminus of Brooloo in April 1915.

The line had become unprofitable by the 1970s and in 1988 staff were withdrawn from all of the stations and some buildings such as goods sheds and residences were sold for removal.

The Mary Valley Heritage Railway Board set out to operate a tourist train on the line in 1996 using volunteers and trainees; tourist train services began in May 1998.

The train currently runs from Gympie as far as Amamoor on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays.

For more information click on:

https://www.maryvalleyrattler.com.au/tickets-and-timetable/

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Celebrate the Inaugural Mary Valley Rail Trail Fun Run (S.E. Qld)

Posted: 18/01/20

The Mary Valley Rail Trail Easter Fun Run is happening on 11 April 2020. The Imbil Easter ...

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Gympie Council wins prestigious award

Posted: 27/12/19

Gympie Regional Council has been formally recognised for its contribution to outdoor spaces with the ...

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Come celebrate the opening of Queenslands newest Rail Trail

Posted: 20/07/19

The much-anticipated Mary Valley Rail Trail opens Sunday 28 July 2019 with a fun-filled community open day. ...

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Mary Valley Rail Trail construction works underway

Posted: 27/05/19

Construction activities have commenced for the Mary Valley Rail Trail from Imbil to Brooloo near ...

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Mary Valley Rail Trail planning feedback (Queensland)

Posted: 04/07/18

Gympie Regional Council is currently in the preliminary stages of planning the Mary Valley Rail ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
The Gayndah- Monto Branch line leaves the main North Coast railway line at Mungar, some 250km north of Brisbane. Once leaving Mungar (22 metres) the lines heads in a westerly direction and climbs over the Woowonga Range before reaching Biggenden 67km from the Junction. Mount Debateable to Humphery is 5 km This section has views of the Burnett River and has many concrete and steel bridges and senic cuttings.

Attractions

The Gayndah Heritage Railway and Rail Trail.

A pilot 5 Km section is being planned from Mount Debateable  to Humphery

THIS PAGE WILL BE UPDATED WHEN MORE INFORMATION IS AVAILABLE

Background Information

The Mungar Junction to Monto Branch is a 267 kilometre railway in Queensland. Progressively opened in eleven stages between 1889 and 1928 the line branched from the North Coast line at Mungar Junction a short distance west of Maryborough and followed a westerly route towards Biggenden and Gayndah before turning north via Mundubbera and Eidsvold to Monto.  The stage to Gayndah was opened on 16 December 1907.  The stage to Boomerang was opened on 1 November 1913 passing through Banapan, Dirnbir, Mount Debatable and Humphrey

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Gayndah Heritage Railway and Rail Trail Official Opening

Posted: 22/05/17

All aboard for a fun day of activities to celebrate the offical of a friendly ...

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Gayndah Heritage Railway and Rail Trail fundraiser event

Posted: 12/09/16

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED Come and Support the the Gayndah Heritage Railway and Rail ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Short walking trail situated 2 km from Buderim town centre
  • Follows an old narrow gauge (2' 6") tramway through bushland
  • The trail is suitable for walkers only.
 

Attractions

This is a well-maintained walking path in the Buderim region of the Sunshine Coast.

The general standard of this trail is good, but care must be taken during wet weather due to slippery pathways.

 

 

 

Trail Guide

Access to this trail is on the corner of Mons and Telco Road, Buderim  (2 km from Buderim Town Centre), with parking on the left hand side of  Telco Road. The path down to the trail is on the right hand side of Telco road and is well sign posted.

The site of the original Telco Station is about 100m towards Buderim from the parking area. From the entrance it is all downhill to the Mons Station site (1100m from the start) and the trail continues on to Liana Place (2km) which is the current end of this trail.

Personal mobility vehicles would be able to access the first 800m. The entrance has a sealed zig zag path,while the rest is compacted earth.

There are no water bubblers or toilet facilities on this trail.

Background Information

Traditional Owners 

We acknowledge the Gubbi Gubbi people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Railway History

This Tramway was built to narrow guage (2’6″) and left the QGR at Palmwoods Station.

No part of the orginal line remains, but there are some sleepers still visible on the walking trail.

The part of the current QR line that runs behind the Palmwoods station is known as the Buderim Loop.

Station along this line were Chevallum, ForestGlen, Mons , Telco, Glenmount and Buderim. There was a siding with a crane called Guys Siding near the Buderim end of the line.

The first train ran on 1st December 1914 and the line was officially opened on the 15 th June 1915.

It was closed on 10th August 1935.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Come and enjoy the Buderim Tramway Centenary June 20 (S.E. QLD)

Posted: 05/06/15

Buderim-Palmwoods Heritage Tramway walk will be celebrating their Centenary on 20 June 2015. Celebrations will include unveiling ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
It is a popular getaway for Brisbaneites, and accommodation types include luxury bed and breakfast (B&B),  farm stays, camping, country hotels and motels. The visitor experience on this rail trail could be enhanced by installing low key rail paraphernalia and better interpretation of the historical points of interest (especially the historic cemetery) and the view points along Pocock Road. Today, Boonah is an attractive and busy town of about 2,500 people. It promotes itself as being "The Heart of the Scenic Rim". The Scenic Rim being the arc of spectacular mountains that stretch north west from the New South Wales border towards Toowoomba.

Attractions

In the vicinity of Boonah there are popular and famous National Parks including some that are World Heritage listed. The Parks include:

  • Mt Barney National Park
  • Main Range National Park
  • Moogerah Peaks National Park comprising Mt French; Mt Greville; Mt Edwards and Mt Moon.

Trail Guide

  • Commencing at the carpark of the Boonah Visitor Information Centre the rail trails starts with a climb to the “Hollywood” style sign that overlooks the town and the VIC. From the town lookout the trail is to the west via a simple walking track.  This section is signposted and has direction markers but the Rail trail is not evident.  The Boonah Lookout can be access by local roads and there is ample parking in this locality, if the climb from the VIC to Athol Terrace is too hard.
  • The walking track leads to the rail trail proper the junction being about 150 m north of the Boonah-Fassifern Road.
  • The rail trail proper is easy to follow and traverse and extends for about 2km until the gate on Pocock Road.  The small historic cemetery adjacent to the rail trail records the resting place for a number of the pioneers of the area.  The cemetery can be accessed from Re Bridge Road and is an alternative parking area for easy access to the rail trail.
  • The trail is located on the southern boundary of Pocock Road, this is a gravel surface along the fence line.  At the top of the hill, about 300m from the gate, is asmall clump of trees where are some great views of the Scenic Rim including Mount French to the south west.
  • The loop trail continues down the slope and south east about 400m along the unformed section of Hoya Road then follows the formed section of Hoya Road (on the eastern footpath) for about 1.4km  to Springleigh Park, the site of the weekly Boonah markets.
  • The trail route then follows the footpath on the southern side of the Ipswich-Boonah Road crossing back to the northern side of the road at the main roundabout (all up about 700m) back to the carpark.
  • Many people, after reaching the lookout or the gate in Pocock Road reurn to the Tourist Information Centre along the old rail formation.
  • There are sections of the old railway line still visible in the town proper.  A section of the rail trail appears  near  Yeates Avenue (at Lions park) and is pedestrian friendly for about 600m to Mount French Road on the western side of Dugandan Park. This was the site of a mjor timber mill in the past.  The “terminus” today is not far from the popular Dugandan Pub.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Bundjalung people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the trail is built.

Development and future 

The Fassifern Rail Trail was one of the trails to be constructed under the South East Queensland Active Trails Strategy. It was to be part of 76 km Boonah to Ipswich Trail. Work on the the long distance trail was suspended in 2012.

Eventually the Boonah to Ipswich Trail will pass through an extensive, rugged and scenic landscapes including Flinders Peak, ridges forming the watershed between Purga Creek, Teviot Brook, Logan River and Bundamba and Deebing Creeks. It is to traverse Wyaralong Dam on Teviot Brook. High points along the Trail have views south and west to the Scenic Rim, east to the greater Brisbane area and Moreton Bay and north to the D’Aguilar Range. The trail was planned to support major urban developments catering for expected population growth in south East Queensland planned for the new cities known as Ripley, Flagstone and Springfield.

The Fassifern Rail Trail utilises a section of the disused railway line on the outskirts of the Boonah township. The Fassifern Rail Trail is being developed in partnership with Scenic Rim Regional Council and local community groups of the Fassifern Valley.

Rail Line History

The former rail line was known as the Dugandan railway line and linked Boonah to Ipswich about 50km to the north.  This railway was reported to be the first branch line in Queensland and the first section (to Harrisville opened in 1882 and reached Dugandan in 1887. The line was closed in 1964.

Evidence of the railway between Boonah and Ipswich can still be seen in various locations along the former route, especially in the villages such as  Harrisville and Peak Crossing.

The area still produces vegetables for the nearby Brisbane market notably carrots, potatoes, and cereal crops.

 

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • A high standard rail trail in the major population centre of Ipswich
  • Great history connections with the first rail line in Queensland, a coke mine, the Rail Workshop Museum and the Smith Street bike route to Ipswich.

Attractions

  • Ipswich is a major regional city in Queensland, with easy access from Brisbane by train and many tourist experiences on offer
  • This trail is one of a number of rail trails in the south-eastern part of Queensland
  • Wulkuraka is also the south-eastern starting point for the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail

Trail Guide

  • The trail starts at Vogel Road and heads north east towards the Brassall shopping centre (Workshops Street) then travels behind the shopping centre, then crosses Haig street.
  • Mihi Junction is reached  soon after crossing Haig St.  There are picnic tables, which are under cover.
  • Soon after the rest area, an 80m steel bridge spans Mihi Creek.  This section of the trail is in bushland.
  • After a short distance, you will come to the next rest stop (Klondyke Junction.) Here you will see the remains of the old coke mine that supplied the Queensland Railways.
  • The current end of this trail is at W.M Hughes Street, North Ipswich at the Rail Workshop Museum.

This trail has lighting and 24 hr camera surveillance and a 3.5m wide concrete surface.

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Yuggera people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is situated.

Railway History

This is on the route of the first rail line in Queensland, from Ipswich to Wulkuraka on the west of Ipswich, which closed in 1868.

This came before the rail line from Ipswich to Brisbane in 1875.  Ipswich was a prime candidate for becoming the capital of Queensland, but lost out to Brisbane in 1859. This is why the direction of the first rail line is this way.

The trail was built in 2008 and opened in 2009, with  a proposed extension in the future further along the line which hugs the Bremer River towards the centre of Ipswich.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Wulkuraka to Brassall opens ( Brisbane Valley Rail Trail)

Posted: 06/09/16

The next stage of the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail opened on August 20 2016 in Ipswich This ...

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Work is progressing well on the Wulkuraka to Brassall section of the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail

Posted: 30/04/16

Contruction on the Link from the Brassall Rail Trail to the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail (...

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Brassall Trail Extensions opened

Posted: 15/07/13

Stage two of the Brassall Rail Trail has opened toward Wulkuraka Railway Station. This section ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway

The line is only 7 k from Hampton to Palmtree and there is then another 7 or 8 k of branch line ending at Ravensbourne. There is easement for all of the 7 k piece from Hampton to Palmtree except about 1k closest to Hampton.

Background Information

This potential Rail Trail in South East Queensland was once a private line of 2 foot 6 inch gauge, which carried timber from Munro’s sawmill at Palmtree to the rail head at Hampton. It opened in about 1903 and operated until about 1936.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Traverses undulating farmland and bushland, with several towns along the route and points of interest
  • The Kilkivan to Murgon section is built to basic standard; Murgon to Kingaroy ‘South Burnett Rail Trail’ section has a sealed surface.
  • The standard of the trail surface varies greatly between sections; refer to description for more detail
  • Suitable for multi-day tours
  • Options for fully supported tours and shuttles

Attractions

  • Scenic rural countryside
  • Good climate most of the year
  • Railway history and heritage
  • Food and accommodation options at the many towns along the trail

Trail Guide

  • Ample car parking at the former station sites at each town
  • Drinking water and toilets only available at towns listed in the descriptions
  • Most of the rail trail has mobile phone reception, as do all towns
  • Kilkivan to Murgon is an unsealed surface, multi-user trail for walkers, cyclists and equestrians
  • Murgon to Kingaroy is an asphalt sealed surface for walkers and cyclists only
  • Dogs on leash are permitted on all sections of the rail trail

Section Guides

Kilkivan to Goomeri  (27.7 km)

  • No water available on this section
  • The trail surface from Kilkivan to Goomeri has a gravel and dirt surface that, mostly, is in good firm condition.
  • There are some rough gully crossings under existing old railway bridges that require care.
  • Many gates to open

Goomeri to Murgon (17.2 km)

  • The unsealed trail surface is variable. Much of this section is good, firm gravel. There is exposed rock ballast from underneath the (removed) old sleepers and tracks in sections and there are sandy sections that can be challenging to cycle.
  • Some steep gully crossings which may may have water in them at times
  • Many gates to open

Kilkivan 

  • Toilets and drinking water
  • Shops, cafe, hotel, petrol station and hotel/motel, B&B
  • Visitor information centre
  • Free camping behind kindergarten

Goomeri

  • Toilets and drinking water
  • Hotel, cafes, motels, petrol station
  • Bakery
  • Visitor information centre
  • Camping available at showgrounds

Murgon

  • Toilets and drinking water
  • Hotel, cafes, motels, petrol station
  • Bakery
  • Visitor information centre
  • Camping available on outskirts
  • Golf course
  • Dairy museum

Murgon to Wondai (13.9 km)

The Murgon to Kingaroy section has a sealed surface and several bridges have been restored, so it is suitable for a variety of users.

Wondai

  • Toilets and drinking water
  • Hotels, cafe, motels, fuel
  • Visitor information centre
  • Free camping in town
  • McEuen State Forest Mountain Bike Park accessed from the rail trail with a signposted entry one kilometre from the old Wondai Rail Station heading towards Kingaroy.

Wondai to Tingoora  (8 km)

Tingoora

  • Toilets and drinking water
  • Hotel (closed July 2020 – Bottle shop open)
  • Free camping

Tingoora to Kingaroy (22km)

Wooroolin

  • Toilets and drinking water
  • Hotel, cafe
  • Free camping beside the trail

Memerambi

  • Toilets

Crawford

  • Emergency drinking water at State school in Siefert St

Kingaroy 

Kingaroy is a major regional centre with all visitor facilities:

  • Accommodation and food
  • Toilets and drinking water
  • Visitor information centre
  • Peanut van
  • Bicycle spares at PSM ProBike in Haly St

Additional Loop Cycling Circuits 

The South Burnett Mountain Bike Club, in conjunction with the South Burnett Rail Trail Users Association, has established clear signposted cycling routes that loop out from the rail trail into the surrounding countryside. These loop rides extend the experience of rail trail users by including short quiet country road routes that highlight the rich agricultural diversity and scenic panoramas of the South Burnett.

East Memerambi Loop

Distance 9.8km, 149m elevation gain, mixture of asphalt and gravel country roads, panoramic views of the countryside.

Memerambi Gordonbrook Dam Route

Distance 13.7km, 99m elevation gain, mixture of asphalt and gravel country roads leading to the scenic Gordonbrook Dam. A basic amenity  block is available at the dam. An out-and-back route. There are single track mountain bike trails at the dam.

Wooroolin West Loop 

Distance 12.6km, 85m elevation gain, mixture of asphalt and gravel country roads, scenic views and an attractive long forested avenue of native trees with an interlocking canopy over the road.

East Wooroolin Loop

Distance 15km, 173m elevation gain, easy gradients leading to a panoramic lookout over the South Burnett, mixture of asphalt, gravel road and dirt road.

West Tingoora Loop

Distance 16.6km, 194m elevation gain, easy gradient to a high vantage point, on an all asphalt road.

East Tingoora Loop

Distance 11.5km, elevation gain 158m, mixture of asphalt and gravel roads with one short steep climb and a longer easier gradient climb providing a scenic view.

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Waka Waka people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail

The rail trail was developed by the Gympie Regional Council and the South Burnett Regional Council, and opened in September 2017 by the Hon Jeff Seeney, Deputy Premier and Minister for State Development, Infrastructure and Planning.

The Theebine to Kingaroy corridor is 131 km long. There are no immediate plans to extend the trail further east, but the Kingaroy to Theebine trail has the potential to connect with the Brisbane Valley Rail Trail and the Bicentennial National Trail. Developing this corridor into a rail trail would deliver a continuous recreation trail more than 350 km long and connect Ipswich to the Sunshine Coast, traversing the regional and rural communities of Gympie, South Burnett, Somerset and Ipswich.

Railway history

The early 1900s was a significant time for rail development in Queensland. The Kingaroy railway was officially opened in 1904, followed by Nanango in 1911.

The Theebine to Nanango line was one of the first branch lines in Queensland. It was used for passenger transport and for agriculture and commercial freight; It was used by the Kingaroy Peanut Marketing Board and by Murgon abattoir.

The Kingaroy to Nanango line closed in July 1964, while Theebine to Kingaroy was officially closed in 2010. Kingaroy did not exist prior to the railway being built but has become a major centre in the South Burnett region because of it.  Having served its purpose, the line is now all but abandoned.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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New bridge at water crossing on Kilkivan to Kingaroy

Posted: 16/10/21

Gympie Regional Council has advised that the low level bridge over a perennial water crossing ...

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South Burnett Rail Trail User Association AGM

Posted: 18/01/20

Come along to the first South Burnett Rail Trail Users Association (SBRTUA) AGM on the 10 ...

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South Burnett Regional Council abandons Bike hire Idea.

Posted: 28/10/19

At last week’s Council meeting, Councillors heard a six-week trial of free bicycle hire ...

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Gympie Council to spend $230K on rail trail resurfacing

Posted: 15/10/19

Gympie Council are going to spend $230K to fix the rough surface of their section ...

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Community Consultation Session – Murgon to Proston Rail Trail (Qld) Feasibility Study

Posted: 28/09/19

Following on from the success of the Murgon to Kingaroy Rail Trail, South Burnett Regional ...

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Join the opening celebrations of “THE LINK cycle Path” opening Nanango (QLD)

Posted: 15/08/19

The LINK CYCLE PATH connects the South Burnett/Killkivan to Kingaroy Rail Trail to the ...

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Murgon Rail Trail Festival Sunday 21st July 2019

Posted: 17/07/19

The Murgon Rail Trail Festival is on again in 2019 bigger and better than  than last ...

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Want to ride the KKRT? Don’t have a bike ? Hire bikes are comming.

Posted: 23/03/19

People who would like to cycle the South Burnett Rail Trail but don’t own ...

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South Burnett Rail Trail Users Association Meeting (SBRTUA)

Posted: 29/01/19

Come along and chat about what we, as an association can do to “value add” ...

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MURGON RAIL TRAIL FESTIVAL & MARATHON ( South Burnett Rail Trail)

Posted: 17/09/18

Come and enjoy the MURGON RAIL TRAIL FESTIVAL & MARATHON Events include, RAIL TRAIL FUN ...

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Wondai Country Festival (on the South Burnett Rail Trail) 23-24 June 2018

Posted: 18/06/18

The Wondai Country Festival will commence at 7am on 23 June with the Wondai Country Market ...

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Grand Opening of the South Burnett Rail Trail Sunday October 1st 2017

Posted: 23/09/17

Big celebrations are being held along the entire 44km of the South Burnett Rail Trail. ...

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Construction resumes on the Kingaroy to Kilkivan Rail Trail

Posted: 25/04/17

The South Burnett Regional Council has resumed work on stage one of the Kingaroy to ...

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Work starts on the Kingaroy- Kilkivan Rail Trail (SE Qld)

Posted: 06/02/16

Construction has commenced on the rail trail with eight  rail bridges to be re-installed  for ...

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Queensland Government funds Newest Rail Trail

Posted: 01/08/14

The Queensland Government has provided  $2 million  from the "Royalties for Regions " for the South Burnett ...

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