Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
The Perth–Fremantle Principal Shared Path (PSP) is a high-quality urban dual use pathway that runs parallel to the Fremantle railway line through Perth’s western suburbs. At 20 km long, the path can be cycled in an hour or walked in approximately four hours.

Attractions

  • Various historical and cultural attractions in and around Perth CBD
  • Café and retail precincts in Subiaco, Claremont, Swanbourne, Cottesloe and North Fremantle
  • Spectacular views over the Indian Ocean
  • The historic harbour city of Fremantle

Section Guides

Yagan Square to Subiaco (3.7 km)

Starting at the Yagan Square digital tower, the path heads west along Wellington St to Perth Arena. Yagan Square and Perth Arena were developed as part of the Perth City Link project, which involved sinking a short section of the Fremantle line, reconnecting the Perth CBD with Northbridge.

After rejoining the railway on the northern side of Perth Arena, the PSP continues west past City West and West Leederville Stations. Approaching Subiaco, the remains of Subiaco Oval (home of Australian Rules Football in WA between 1908 and 2017) can be seen on the left. After crossing beneath Haydn Bunton Drive, the railway enters another tunnel. The PSP continues at surface level through the Market Square parklands before arriving at Subiaco Station at the northern end of Rokeby Rd.

 Subiaco to Claremont (5.8 km)

Leaving Subiaco, the PSP continues on the northern side of Roberts Rd through the Subi Centro redevelopment area. The PSP passes beneath Hay St via an underpass, where it rejoins the railway at Jolimont Park. Heading southwest, the PSP continues along the western side of the railway past Daglish, Shenton Park, Karrakatta and Loch Street Stations. Key points of interest along this section include the Irwin Army Barracks and Karrakatta Cemetery.

The path runs along the southern edge of Claremont Showgrounds, home of the WA Royal Agricultural Society and Perth Royal Show before arriving at Claremont Station – one of the oldest and most historic stations on the Perth rail network. Claremont itself is a major retail area home to many restaurants, cafes, and speciality stores.

Claremont to North Fremantle (7.0 km)

Heading south, the PSP continues on the western side of the railway. Smaller retail precincts can be found along Claremont Crescent (near Swanbourne Station) and Napoleon St (near Cottesloe Station). There is a connecting path to Cottesloe Beach along Forrest St.  Cottesloe Beach is one of the most famous beaches in Perth, and is home to the annual Sculptures by the Sea art exhibition. The section between Mosman Park and North Fremantle stations offers spectacular views over the Indian Ocean.

North Fremantle to Fremantle (2.9 km)

Between North Fremantle Station and the Swan River, the best route is via Pearse St. Users are advised to take care when crossing Tydeman Rd, a busy freight route. On the southern side of Tydeman Rd the path continues behind the Swan Hotel and on to the historic Fremantle Traffic Bridge. The final section between the Swan River and central Fremantle can be undertaken using Beach St (where there is a footpath and on-road bike lanes) or via the shared path on Peter Hughes Dr. Beach St runs past the historic Fremantle Woolstores, whereas Peter Hughes Dr runs past the Fremantle Passenger Terminal and E-Shed Markets.

Background Information

Traditional owners

Rail Trails Australia acknowledges the Whadjuk people of the Noongar Nation, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which this pathway is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

Over the next few years, the PSP will be extended from North Fremantle Station to the Swan River as part of the Swan River Crossings project, which includes replacement of the existing Fremantle Traffic Bridge and duplication of the rail bridge.

Rail line history 

The Fremantle railway line connects Perth with Fremantle. The line opened on 1 March 1881 as the “Eastern Railway” and ran between Fremantle and Guildford via central Perth. In July 1926, the Fremantle Railway Bridge over the Swan River was partly washed away in a flood, with one line restored in 1926 and the second in 1928.

Passenger services on the Fremantle line were suspended in September 1979. The WA Government planned to convert the railway reserve into a busway. The closure of the line was opposed by Friends of the Railway, which submitted a petition of 100,000 signatures and prepared a 98-page report arguing for its retention. The service was reinstated in July 1983 following a change of government. The railway was electrified in 1991. Over the years, two sections of the railway have been ‘sunk’. The Subiaco tunnel opened in 1998 and the Perth City Link tunnel opened in 2014.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • An easy walk through narrow bush trails
  • Shared trailhead with Jarrahdale-Balmoral Rail Trail

Attractions

  • Interpretive signage explains timber industry features such as the log landing and sawpit
  • Many wildflowers in spring

Trail Guide

The trail begins at the 1890s timber tramway off Balmoral Rd just east of Jarrahdale. There is a picnic area and the trail crosses a small bridge and up some steps.

It is suitable for almost all levels of ability; it has a compacted earth surface with some gentle ascents and a few steps.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Whadjuk people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • A short trail that runs along the eastern edge of the Margaret River townsite, suitable for hiking and cycling
  • Interesting birdlife and wildflowers
  • Links to other trails including the Ten Mile Brook Trail

Attractions

  • The new Margaret River footbridge
  • Views over countryside

Trail Guide

Also known as the Wannang Biddi, the Darch Road Trail begins at the Ten Mile Brook Trail (Bunitj Biddi) just west of Margaret River Perimeter Rd. Heading south, the trail crosses the river via newly build footbridge then joins the alignment of a historic timber tramway formation before finishing at Andrews Way (formerly known as Rosa Brook Rd)

Background Information

Traditional owners

Rail Trails Australia acknowledges the Wadandi people of the Noongar Nation, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which this rail trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

The Shire of Augusta Margaret River plans to build a connecting path linking the southern end of the Darch Trail to the Wadandi Track, enabling trail users to circumnavigate the Margaret River townsite via three rail trails – the Wadandi Track, the Ten Mile Brook Trail and the Darch Trail.

Rail line history

The Darch Trail follows one of the many old timber tramways in the Margaret River area.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
The Manjimup to Deanmill Heritage Trail is a short rail trail near Manjimup in WA’s Southwest. The trail gives visitors an insight into the district’s forestry, farming and railway history. Manjimup is known for its undulating land, tall timbers, abundant fresh water and rich soils.

Attractions

  • Tall forest, scenic open farmland
  • The small timber town of Deanmill, which includes a number of historic mill cottages, the Deanmill Workers Club and the Deanmill Football Oval
  • Other attractions in around Manjimup including Fontys Pool, Diamond Tree Lookout and One Tree Bridge

Trail Guide

The Manjimup to Deanmill Heritage Trail is on the alignment of a historic timber tramway that connected the Deanmill sawmill to the main line at Manjimup. Starting in Manjimup near the intersection of Rose St and Lock St, the trail heads west parallel to Ipsen St.

The trail passes through enclosed natural bushland before transitioning to open areas with views over farmland. The first kilometre is asphalt and the remainder is compacted gravel.

At its eastern end, this trail provides a connection to the Manjimup Linear Path. Forming a ‘T’, the two rail trails intersect in the centre of Manjimup just south of Ipsen Street. The Manjimup to Deanmill Heritage Trail also forms part of the 1000 km Munda Biddi MTB trail linking Perth to Albany.

Background Information

Traditional owners

Rail Trails Australia acknowledge the Murrum people of the Noongar Nation, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which this rail trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

The Manjimup to Deanmill Heritage Trail was established in the 1990s and upgraded in 2017.

Rail line history 

The Deanmill tramway was built in 1912 to connect the sawmill (which supplied timber sleepers for the Transcontinental Railway) to the main line in Manjimup. The Deanmill settlement was named after the mill’s first manager, Alfred Dean. Following the closure of the tramway in 1966, the reserve has regrown and forms an important green corridor on the western side of Manjimup.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
The Manjimup Linear Path is a short, high-quality rail trail located in the south west town of Manjimup. Manjimup is known for its undulating land, tall timbers, abundant fresh water and rich soils.

Attractions

  • Manjin Park, which includes a barbecue area and skate park
  • Manjimup Heritage Park, which includes Manjimup Historic Hamlet, State Timber Museum, PowerUp! Electricity Museum and a children’s playground with a 17 m tall slide
  • Other attractions in and around Manjimup including Fontys Pool, Diamond Tree Lookout and One Tree Bridge

Trail Guide

This trail runs from Manjimup Heritage Park near Graphite Road to the southern edge of town at Seven Day Road. The linear path is built on a disused section of the Northcliffe Branch Railway (also known as the Picton to Northcliffe line). The path is paved and suitable for people of all ages and abilities.

The linear path also provides a connection to the nearby Manjimup to Deanmill Heritage Trail. Forming a ‘T’, the two rail trails intersect in the centre of Manjimup just south Ipsen Street.

Background Information

Traditional owners

Rail Trails Australia acknowledge the Murrum people of the Noongar Nation, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which this rail trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

Manjimup Linear Path officially opened in 2018 as part of the Manjimup Town Centre Revitalisation project. The Shire of Manjimup 2017-2027 Local Bicycle and Footpath Plan mentions the possibility of extending the trail south to Pemberton or north to Bridgetown.

Rail line history 

Construction of the Picton to Northcliffe railway began in 1887, with the line reaching Manjimup in 1911 and Northcliffe in 1933. The area around Manjimup developed quickly following the establishment of the Group Settlement Scheme in the 1920s. The line ceased operation in the early 2000s. In recent years there have been calls to reopen the line between Picton and Greenbushes to transport lithium ore from the Talison Lithium mine to processing facilities near Bunbury.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
The Ranford Pool Walk Trail is a short rail trail near Boddington in the Peel region. On the alignment of the former Pinjarra–Narrogin line, the trail finishes at Darnmining Pool (also known as Ranford Pool). Boddington has accommodation, cafes, a hotel and a supermarket. The best time to visit is between April and October, when the Hotham River contains water and the surrounding farmland is lush.

Attractions

  • The small town of Boddington
  • Hotham River foreshore
  • Ranford Pool
  • Other connecting trails such as the Tullis Bridge Walk Trail

Trail Guide

Following Hotham River, the trail winds through paperbark thickets and rural paddocks and ends near the site of the former Tannin Extracts Factory in Ranford.

Section Guides

The first part of the walk is fully paved along the old railway alignment; wide enough for bikes, prams and wheelchairs. At River Rd it continues north to the river and pool. Returning west along the riverbank when water levels permit, a separate path reverts to a more natural state and ends as a narrow walking trail only, rejoining the start of the trail closer to town.

Darnmining/Ranford Pool is a deep part of Hotham River that served the tannin factory from the 1930s to the 1960s. The pool is a popular with local children as a swimming hole. The walk trail is signposted and has information signs on the area’s birds and fishes.

Background Information

Traditional owners

Rail Trails Australia acknowledges the Wiilman people of the Noongar Nation, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the trail is built.

 

Development and future of the rail trail 

In 2020 the Peel Alliance (comprising the Mandurah, Murray, Serpentine-Jarrahdale, Waroona and Boddington Councils) released a State funding submission that focused on a variety of infrastructure, jobs and tourism initiatives.  The document identified several rail trail opportunities within a short drive of Perth, including the proposed Hotham Valley Rail Trail, which would involve upgrading/combining the Tullis Bridge and Ranfrod Pool Walk Trails, and extending them west to Dwellingup.

 

Rail line history 

The Pinjarra to Narrogin railway was a 153 km line built between Pinjarra and Narrogin. The line opened in stages between 1910 and 1927 to serve the timber industry as well as rural and fruit-growing industries. Pinjarra and Narrogin are on the South Western and Great Southern main lines, so the Pinjarra to Narrogin line provided an important link with towns and mills such as Dwellingup and Boddington. The closing of many of local timber mills led to a decline in traffic on the line and services were withdrawn until last service ended in 1984. The Hotham Valley Railway operates a heritage railway over 32 km between Pinjarra and Etmilyn, near Dwellingup.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
The Tullis Bridge Walk Trail is a short rail trail to the west of Boddington in WA’s Peel region. The trail provides visitors with insights into the area’s timber, mining and agricultural heritage.

Attractions

  • The small town of Boddington
  • Hotham River foreshore
  • Picturesque open farmland and remnant bushland
  • Remains of Tullis Bridge (partially destroyed by fire in 2009)
  • Federation Crossing, a historic stone crossing where early settlers crossed the Hotham River east of Tullis Bridge
  • Other connecting trails, such as Ranford Pool

Trail Guide

The Tullis Bridge Walk Trails begins in Boddington and follows the alignment of the Pinjarra-Narrogin railway, which ran parallel to the Hotham River.

Boddington has accommodation, cafes, hotel and a supermarket. The best time to visit is between April and October when the Hotham River is flowing and the surrounding farmland is lush.

Section Guides

The Tullis Bridge Walk Trail extends west from the Lions Rodeo Grounds in central Boddington. After leaving Boddington the trail passes through farmland and timber reserves before arriving at the remains of Tullis Bridge, built in 1912 to link the railway line from Pinjarra with Narrogin for use by the timber industry up to 1968.

At Tullis Bridge a separate 3 km walking trail takes you around the bridge and river for birdwatching, wildflowers and scenery. There are shady areas for lunch or a snack.

This trail still has tracks in sleepers in place, making it unsuitable for wheelchairs, prams and some types of bike. Trail users have to open and close a number of gates as the trail passes through working farms.

Background Information

Traditional owners

Rail Trails Australia acknowledges the Wiilman people of the Noongar Nation, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which this rail trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

In 2020 the Peel Alliance (comprising the Mandurah, Murray, Serpentine-Jarrahdale, Waroona and Boddington Councils) released a State funding submission that focused on a variety of infrastructure, jobs and tourism initiatives. The document identified several rail trail opportunities within a short drive of Perth, including the proposed Hotham Valley Rail Trail, which would involve extending the Tullis Bridge Walk Trail west to Dwellingup. At around 40 km, the trail would involve restoring Tullis Bridge.

Rail line history 

The Pinjarra to Narrogin railway was a 153 km line built between Pinjarra and Narrogin. The line opened in stages between 1910 and 1927 to serve the timber industry as well as rural and fruit-growing industries. Pinjarra and Narrogin are on the South Western and Great Southern main lines, so the Pinjarra to Narrogin line provided an important link with towns and mills such as Dwellingup and Boddington.  The closing of many of local timber mills led to a decline in traffic on the line and services were withdrawn until last service ended in 1984. The Hotham Valley Railway operates a heritage railway over 32 km between Pinjarra and Etmilyn, near Dwellingup.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Two rail trail opportunities identified in WA’s Peel Region

Posted: 01/02/21

The Peel Alliance (comprising Mandurah, Murray, Serpentine-Jarrahdale, Waroona and Boddington Councils) has recently released their ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • travels through a range of scenery as it links the small towns of Torbay and Elleker
  • built along the same rail corridor as the Denmark-Nornalup Heritage Rail Trail, and forms part of the 1000 km Munda Biddi Trail
  • largely enjoyed by Munda Biddi cyclists, but also popular with walkers and horse riders

Attractions

  • Elleker and its quaint cottages
  • a mix of karri forest, she-oak woodlands and wetlands
  • wildflower blooms, particularly in late spring
  • farmland and rolling hills
  • Torbay Hall and its biannual Torbay Hall Markets

Trail Guide

Torbay Community Hall – Hassell St Park

  • the trail starts at Torbay Community Hall, built in 1912 and still a popular meeting place for the community. From the trailhead the trail passes through low forest before heading along a corridor with farmland on both sides
  • a highlight along the farmland is Wilsons Wrecking Yard, a collection of hundreds of cars, trucks, buses and farm machinery spread across hectares. Entering swampland, karri forest and she-oak woodlands, the trail provides a green corridor to the outskirts of Elleker
  • crossing Marbellup Brook, the trail reaches its end at the parkland on Hassell Rd

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Minang people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

This trail is built long the same rail corridor as the Denmark-Nornalup Heritage Rail Trail, with some smaller, discontinuous sections of the corridor used by the Munda Biddi. There is potential for future extension of the trail to link the sections.

Rail line history 

The South Coast Railway was built by private contractors in three stages. The Millars built the first stage from Elleker to Torbay in 1884, then commenced sawmilling in Denmark so extended the line to there in 1985. The Group Settlement Scheme began in Denmark in 1923, and because road transport was rare there was a demand to extend the line to Nornalup, which was completed in 1929.  The line had many cuttings and embankments, and was entirely by pick and shovel and horse-drawn drays. The line from Elleker to Nornalup closed in 1954.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • A short trail that runs from Margaret River out to Ten Mile Brook Dam, suitable for hiking and cycling
  • Interesting bird life and wildflowers
  • Picnic site at Ten Mile Brook Dam which has toilet and barbecue facilities.
  • Linkages to the Wadandi Track and Darch Trail

Attractions

  • Rotary Park and the Old Settlement
  • Views over the Margaret River countryside
  • Ten Mile Brook Dam
  • Rusden picnic site

Trail Guide

Also known as the Bunitj Biddi, the Ten Mile Brook Trail starts in the Rotary Park near ‘Old Kate,’ a preserved steam engine at the northern edge of Margaret River. Much of the trail follows an old timber tramway formation that ran parallel to the Margaret River. The trail finishes at the Rusden picnic site at Ten Mile Brook Dam, built in the mid-1990s to supply water for Margaret River and other nearby townships.

Section Guides

This 15 km return trail is a combination of compacted earth and coarse gravel suitable for bikes. A bridge over the weir allows a safe crossing when the river is in full flow. When you arrive at the bridge you can return to the picnic ground along this path; the rest of this trail follows the meandering river with some wonderful views and scenery along the way.

Toward the eastern end of the trail there are two optional loops bypassing areas that can become flooded in winter months. Near the dam there is a picnic area, barbecues, toilets, and shelters. While walking along Ten Mile Brook Trail, keep an eye out for the white breasted robin, golden whistler and other bush birds. This is also a great spot for wildflowers in spring.

Background Information

Traditional owners

Rail Trails Australia acknowledges the Wadandi people of the Noongar Nation, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which this rail trail is built.

 

Development and future of the rail trail 

This trail was originally developed in the 1980s as part of national Bicentennial celebrations.

 

Rail line history

The Ten Mile Brook trail follows one of several old timber tramways in the Margaret River area.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • The Sidings Rail Trail follows part of the route of the Nannup Branch Railway, linking the small settlement of Jarrahwood with the town of Nannup. Running alongside St Johns Brook, the trail provides views from rail bridges across the brook and the Blackwood River as it enters Nannup
  • A gentle and easy ride suitable for families and less experienced riders, the trail forms part of the 1000 km Munda Biddi Trail that stretches from Mundaring in the Perth Hills south to Albany

Attractions

  • A gentle, easy ride along a well maintained rail trail
  • Crossing the impressive rail bridges over the Blackwood River and St Johns Brook, and passing several more disused bridges
  • Informative panels on the area’s railway and timber heritage
  • Views of the ‘flood tree,’ which marks major flood events along the river
  • Riding and walking through stands of mature jarrah forest and along St Johns Brook
  • Wildflower blooms, particularly in late spring
  • Overnight camping in Jarrahwood at the Munda Biddi’s Nala Mia shelter
  • Can be combined with the Old Timberline Trail to form a comfortable day loop ride from the trail town of Nannup

Trail Guide

Jarrahwood to Nannup

Starting at the small settlement of Jarrahwood, the trail leaves town via Old Vasse Rd parallel to the rail formation, then joins the rail formation as the trail crosses Vasse Hwy. Passing a number of disused rail bridges, the trail goes gently downhill as it crosses St Johns Brook on the way to Cambray Siding, where the Old Timberline Trail provides an alternative route to Nannup.

From Cambray Siding, the trail is mildly uphill as it passes Rocky Gully and farmland before crossing Vasse Hwy. Passing through a mix of Jarrah forest and farmland, the trail reaches the banks of Blackwood River as it crosses the Old Railway Bridge into Nannup.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Bibbulman people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

The Warren-Blackwood 2050 Cycling Strategy identifies the disused Ruabon-Tutunup rail corridor as an opportunity to link Jarrahwood with Busselton, which would see the trail cover all of the old Nannup Branch Railway.

Rail line history 

The Nannup Branch Railway from Wonnerup to Jarrahwood was completed in 1898 by the Jarrah Wood and Saw Mills Company to transfer timber to the port of Busselton. The line operated until 1903 before being bought by the WA Government Railways in 1907. The line was completed to Nannup via Cambray Siding in 1909 and operated until 1984.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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