Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Easy to access objects and plentiful signage
  • Walking distance from all the town’s accommodation
  • Best seen by walking but can be cycled

Attractions

  • Pine Creek Railway Museum

Trail Guide

Access points:

• Main Terrace or Millar Terrace
• Access to the rail bridge and reservoir is by walking over mown lawn areas with no distinct paths.

Note: The map is indicative. The paths in the Water Garden are actually loops, and there is no path from the rail yards to the bridge over the creek or the reservoir. The line shown on the map is simply to inform you that the trail passes through the park and beyond to the creek.

Section Guides

The Pine Creek Railway Precinct was the initial terminus of an uncompleted 19th Century trans-continental railway system. Its contribution to the development of the mining boom in the late 19th Century was profound, enabling companies to transport machinery and equipment with greater ease to the mine fields than had been possible previously. It was also a catalyst for the opening of new mines in the area. Its contribution to the development of Pine Creek and other towns along its route was also important.

Pine Creek maintained its importance after the railway was extended to Katherine and during WWII when it became one of the four dispersal bases on the North Australian Railway. The area has high architectural and historical associations and remains a key feature in the township’s heritage and streetscape.

The adjacent Miners Park is important in that it provides a visible link between the railway and the mining industry which it contributed so much to. Its significance also lies in the fact that it provides a place where mining machinery and technology from mines, which are no longer operational or exist, can be maintained to assist in the interpretation of the area’s mining history.

The adjacent Water Gardens was developed over the former cutting of the rail extension to Katherine. It has some short walking paths and at the far end there remains a home signal tower.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the ________ people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Railway history

The first section of the narrow gauge North Australia Railway from Darwin to Pine Creek opened in 1888 to service mines in the area. It was extended south to Katherine in 1926 and finally Larrimah in 1929, which was as far south as it went, never linking up to the Adelaide to Alice Springs railway. Never-the-less, it played a vital role in the development of the Northern Territory and Australia during the WWII. However once the war was over, improving roads, its isolation, and finally damage to iron ore loading facilities at Darwin Port from Cyclone Tracy resulted in the railway being closed in 1976.

The new standard gauge Alice Springs – Darwin railway opened in 2004 and parts of the new railway were placed on the old North Australia Railway alignment. However, some parts of the old line were bypassed, including the section through Pine Creek town. Many parts of the railway have been declared heritage places, including the precinct itself and many of the separate items that remain.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
The Ranford Pool Walk Trail is a short rail trail near Boddington in the Peel region. On the alignment of the former Pinjarra–Narrogin line, the trail finishes at Darnmining Pool (also known as Ranford Pool). Boddington has accommodation, cafes, a hotel and a supermarket. The best time to visit is between April and October, when the Hotham River contains water and the surrounding farmland is lush.

Attractions

  • The small town of Boddington
  • Hotham River foreshore
  • Ranford Pool
  • Other connecting trails such as the Tullis Bridge Walk Trail

Trail Guide

Following Hotham River, the trail winds through paperbark thickets and rural paddocks and ends near the site of the former Tannin Extracts Factory in Ranford.

Section Guides

The first part of the walk is fully paved along the old railway alignment; wide enough for bikes, prams and wheelchairs. At River Rd it continues north to the river and pool. Returning west along the riverbank when water levels permit, a separate path reverts to a more natural state and ends as a narrow walking trail only, rejoining the start of the trail closer to town.

Darnmining/Ranford Pool is a deep part of Hotham River that served the tannin factory from the 1930s to the 1960s. The pool is a popular with local children as a swimming hole. The walk trail is signposted and has information signs on the area’s birds and fishes.

Background Information

Traditional owners

Rail Trails Australia acknowledges the Wiilman people of the Noongar Nation, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the trail is built.

 

Development and future of the rail trail 

In 2020 the Peel Alliance (comprising the Mandurah, Murray, Serpentine-Jarrahdale, Waroona and Boddington Councils) released a State funding submission that focused on a variety of infrastructure, jobs and tourism initiatives.  The document identified several rail trail opportunities within a short drive of Perth, including the proposed Hotham Valley Rail Trail, which would involve upgrading/combining the Tullis Bridge and Ranfrod Pool Walk Trails, and extending them west to Dwellingup.

 

Rail line history 

The Pinjarra to Narrogin railway was a 153 km line built between Pinjarra and Narrogin. The line opened in stages between 1910 and 1927 to serve the timber industry as well as rural and fruit-growing industries. Pinjarra and Narrogin are on the South Western and Great Southern main lines, so the Pinjarra to Narrogin line provided an important link with towns and mills such as Dwellingup and Boddington. The closing of many of local timber mills led to a decline in traffic on the line and services were withdrawn until last service ended in 1984. The Hotham Valley Railway operates a heritage railway over 32 km between Pinjarra and Etmilyn, near Dwellingup.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Ongoing construction of high quality cycling/walking paths to link up existing pathways.
  • All new sections are suitable for all types of cycles and people using mobility aids.
  • Beautiful riverside and coastal scenery along the edge of Bass Strait
  • Crossing eight rivers including historic railway swing bridge over the Forth River
  • Numerous accommodation, eating and coffee options in the small towns and larger centres of Devonport and Burnie – many of these immediately adjacent to the pathway.
  • Numerous easily cyclable side trips available to other attractions and scenic parts of the north west coast including new mountain bike trails at Latrobe and Penguin

Attractions

  • Platypuses in the wild at the Warrawee reserve on the Mersey River at Latrobe and Fernglade reserve on the Emu River in Burnie
  • The Bass Strait Maritime Museum and the Tiagarra Aboriginal Cultural Centre in Devonport
  • Fairy Penguins come ashore on summer nights at the viewing centres at Lillico and Burnie main beach
  • Ride a real steam train at the Don River Railway
  • Safe swimming at patrolled beaches at Mersey Bluff, Ulverstone, Preservation Bay, Burnie Main Beach and Somerset.
  • Pick your own berries in summer at Turners Beach Berry Patch.
  • Visit the “Makers Workshop” in Burnie that celebrates the papermaking and manufacturing history of Burnie.

Trail Guide

The complete trail is a mixture of cycle paths, roads and rail trails.

Please read each section carefully so you are fully aware of the route.

Please take care on the roadways.

Access Points

  • Latrobe
  • Devonport
  • Don
  • Turners Beach
  • Ulverstone
  • Penguin
  • Burnie
  • Wynyard

Section Guides

Latrobe to Devonport (10km)

  • Mostly dedicated separate cycle/walking path. Short on-road section (vehicle speed limit 60 km/hr) with marked cycle way.
  • There are public toilets at the beginning and end of this section as well as at Bells Parade park.
  • From Station Square in Latrobe (site of the old Railway Station), cross Gilbert St and follow the Sheean Walk on the formation of the old rail line heading west towards Bells Parade and the Mersey River. This walk commemorates the bravery of local lad Ordinary Seaman “Teddy” Sheean who died defending his mates on the sinking HMAS Armidale when under attack by Japanese aircraft in 1942. 68 years later he was awarded a posthumous Victoria Cross.

Side trip: From Latrobe, follow the eastern side of the Mersey River 3 km upstream on Shale Rd to the newly opened Wild Mersey Mountain Bike park and to see platypuses in the wild at Warrawee reserve.

  • From the Sheean walk, follow the path through Bells Parade park to the start of the beautiful new path that runs along the eastern side of the Mersey River and adjacent to River Rd all the way to Devonport. The last kilometre through the suburb of Ambleside is on a marked cycle lane on the edge of River Rd. Beware of parked cars obstructing the bike lane. It may be safer to ride on the footpath (legal in Tasmania unless signed otherwise).
  • When you get to the highway bridge over the river turn left up the slip path onto the bridge and cross the river via the pedestrian footpath which then joins the Devonport – Don cycleway into the CBD on the western side of the river.

Side trip: After crossing the Mersey river, turn left on to the link path to Spreyton. This path follows the west bank of the Mersey River a further 3 km adjacent to the working freight railway to a lovely picnic spot at the Horsehead Creek park.

Alternate route to Devonport CBD: Instead of crossing the Mersey River on the highway pedestrian footpath, ignore the slip path and continue under the highway overpass and through parkland and an on-road bike lane to the cross river ferry terminal near the East Devonport shopping centre. Cross the river on the cute little ferry “Spirit of Devonport” – the tiny relative to the large Bass Strait ferry “Spirit of Tasmania”. You can take your bike on the little ferry at no cost. Re-join the Devonport – Don cycleway at the Harbourmasters café.

Devonport to Don (8 km)

  • Separate dedicated cycle/walking path.
  • Public toilets at the beginning and end of this section as well as at Coles Beach.
  • Follow the Devonport to Don cycleway along the parklands on the Mersey River bank and Bass Strait coast then through the Don reserve as far as the Devonport Aquatic centre. (See elsewhere in this publication for a full description of this section).

Don to Turners Beach (11 km)

The route of the Coastal Pathway on this section is yet to be confirmed. The following description describes the most direct route on existing roads. Highway speed limit 110/km/hr. Other roads 60 – 80 km/hr.

  • There are public toilets at the beginning and end of this section and in the park at Forth Village.
  • Turn right off the Devonport – Don cycleway just past the Devonport Aquatic Centre and descend steeply on the track marked to the Sawdust Bridge. Cross the railway line (look out for trains – this line is used regularly by rail motor and steam trains of the heritage Don River Railway) and then cross the Don River on the new “Sawdust Bridge”
  • Turn right after crossing the Sawdust bridge on to the old tramway formation which continues as Waverly Rd up the Don Hill to where it meets the busy Bass Highway.
  • Take extreme care crossing this busy four lane highway and continue your ride on the reasonably wide shoulder of the highway with Bass Strait on your right all the way to the Turners Beach turn off.
  • On the way you will pass the Penguin viewing area on your right at the start of the Lillico straight. This is a good place to come on a summer evening and watch the fairy penguins come ashore.
  • Shortly before the turn off to Turners Beach you will cross the Forth River. On your right you will see the old rail bridge over the Forth River which is a rare swing bridge that could rotate to allow small ships to travel up the river. The bridge has been preserved and will carry the new cycleway over the river as part of the Coastal Pathway development connecting Turners Beach and Leith.
  • Take the slip road off to the left at the Turners Beach turn off, then cross the highway overpass and the level crossing of the working freight railway line. There are good coffee options in Turners beach and the Berry Patch is a great place to go for an ice cream and pick your own strawberries in summer.

Alternative route from Don to Turners Beach: This is a slightly longer but much quieter route on Forth Rd (B19). Ignore the turn off to the Sawdust Bridge at the Devonport Aquatic centre and instead continue on to the Don River Railway complex. Cross the Don River at this point and continue under the highway along Forth Rd. This goes through rolling farmlands with lovely views to the coast. At about the 6 km mark, you can turn right onto Braddons Lookout Rd for an even better view of the northwest coast. At about 8 km from Don, the route descends to the small village of Forth and crosses the river at this point. There is a general store, coffee shop and a great pub here. A further 3 km along B19 takes you to Turners Beach crossing the highway via an overpass and re-join the Coastal pathway.

Turners Beach to Ulverstone (6 km)

  • Mostly separate dedicated cycle/walking paths.
  • There are public toilets at the beginning and end of this section as well as at the Ulverstone Surf Club
  • Bike hire is available at the Beach Shack café.
  • From the rail crossing on the road into Turners Beach, turn west onto the new concrete path that runs parallel with the working freight railway line.
  • At the 3.5 km mark, cross the rail line and onto Beach Rd which continues to parallel the railway line. This is a “No through Road” to vehicles and has numerous speed bumps. The few vehicles you might encounter will be traveling very slowly.
  • At the Beach Shack cafe, leave Beach Rd and continue along the path through Bicentennial Park. This is an older rather narrow bitumen path and very popular with dog walkers, young children and people with mobility aids. Please take care.
  • This path turns into a new wide concrete path for the last part of the ride, finishing at the Wharf Precinct on the Leven River. There is a Farmers Market here on Sundays.
  • Ulverstone is a large town with a range of accommodation, food and coffee options. There is a cycle shop at the southern end of King Edward St and helpful folk at the Information Centre in Alexandra Rd next to the railway line.

Ulverstone to Penguin (12 km)

  • Partly separate dedicated cycle/walking path. Partly on-road section with speed limit 60-70 km/hr.
  • There are public toilets at the beginning and end of this section
  • Continue from the Ulverstone Wharf Precinct on the new wide concrete path over the Leven River. Take care here as there is no barrier between the raised Pedestrian/Cycle path and the roadway.
  • Turn right after coming off the bridge and follow the concrete path along the west bank of the Leven River towards the river mouth.
  • Near the Tennis Club, the path changes to an old and somewhat uneven cobbled pathway then crosses the railway line at a very tight chicane. It is better to dismount and walk through this crossing.
  • After crossing the railway line, turn right onto Queen St that then becomes Penguin Rd. You and the railway line will hug the coast all the way to Penguin.
  • At about the 5km mark, there is a short, winding hill section around the Three Sisters – Goat Island reserve. The road and railway are squeezed into a tight space between the hillside and the coast line. Take care especially on weekends as this very scenic route is very popular with tourists and serious road cyclists.
  • Finish at the “Big Penguin” overlooking the beach in the charming little town of Penguin. There are six cafes here and some seriously good coffee. A very popular place with the local cyclists. Opposite the Big Penguin is a small Information Centre staffed by friendly volunteers.

Side trip: Follow Ironcliffe Rd for a short distance south out of Penguin, over the highway overpass and just past the school to the awesome Penguin Mountain Bike park. There are numerous trails in and around the Dial Range reserve that cater for all levels of MTB riders.

Penguin to Burnie (16 km)

  • Partly on-road section with speed limit of 70 km/hr, a short section of highway with speed limit 110 km/hr, and partly on separate dedicated cycle/walking path. Funding has been allocated and construction is due to start soon on a high quality cycle/walking path on the section from Penguin to Sulphur Creek.
  • There are public toilets at the beginning and end of this section and also at the Penguin Surf Club at Preservation Bay.
  • From the “Big Penguin”, head west and turn right at the traffic light onto Preservation Drive. This is a popular tourist and cycle route with a reasonable road shoulder for cyclists. Speed limit for cars is 70 km/hr. The working rail line and coast line will be on your right almost all the way to Burnie.
  • At the 6km mark at Sulphur Creek, turn left onto Zig Zag Rd, go under the highway overpass and immediately turn right onto the dedicated cycle/walking path which runs adjacent to the highway. This is an older bitumen path and a bit narrow.
  • Follow this path all the way to the Heybridge roundabout at the 9km mark.
  • The route from Heybridge around Round Hill to Wivenhoe on the outskirts of Burnie is yet to be confirmed. At the time of writing, the most direct route is to continue on the reasonably wide shoulder of the highway. Note: this section of highway is 4 lane with a speed limit of 100 km/hr.

Alternative route: A longer and somewhat hilly route through farmland will avoid the highway. Leave the highway just after crossing the Blythe River and head south on Minna Rd (C113) for 7km. Turn right on to Stowport Rd (C102) for about 6 km heading north rejoining the main road at Wivenhoe.

  • At Wivenhoe, cross the Emu River then cross the highway at the traffic lights and onto the wide concrete cycle/walking path which will take you into the Burnie CBD avoiding any further road traffic.
  • Finish this section at the Burnie Surf Life Saving Club on Main Beach. Burnie is a major regional centre with a large range of accommodation, eating and coffee options. There is a cycle shop on North Terrace very close to the Surf Club. The Information Centre is located in the Makers Workshop at the western end of Burnie Beach.

 Side trip: At the Wivenhoe traffic lights, turn left into Old Surrey Rd, then left again on a new dedicated cycle/walking path beside the Emu River for about 1 km to the beautiful Fernglade Reserve where platypuses can be seen in the wild.

Burnie to Wynyard (18 km)

  • Dedicated walking/cycle path as far as Cooee. On road cycle lanes as far as Somerset then on road sections with varying speed limits up to 100km/hr.
  • There are public toilets at the beginning and end of this section and also at the Cam River reserve at Somerset.
  • From the Surf Club, continue west on the Beach boardwalk adjacent to the (disused) rail line and around the headland past the Information Centre and Makers Workshop. There is a Penguin Viewing Centre next to the pathway and the little fairy penguins can be seen here in summer returning to their nests amongst the rocks.
  • The wide concrete pathway continues next to the rail line as far as Cooee and ends rather abruptly at the 2.5 km mark at the Brickport Rd intersection.
  • From this point to Wynyard, the only current option is to continue on the main road. There is a narrow on road cycle lane marked as far as Somerset.
  • Just past Doctors Rocks, turn right off the Bass highway on to the Old Highway (C240) which continues adjacent to the disused railway line. Join on to a wide walking/cycle track when you meet the seafront parkland.
  • Funding has recently been announced to lift the rails on the disused line which hugs the coast all the way to Wynyard and build the long-awaited high quality cycle/walking rail trail linking Burnie and Wynyard.
  • Wynyard is a sizable town with a good range of accommodation, eating and coffee options. It is the home of the annual Tulip Festival in October. The disused rail line actually passes through the regional airport grounds and crosses the actual aircraft runway for many years until the runway was realigned to avoid a possible train – plane collision!
  • Finish your trip in the lovely Gutteridge Gardens on the banks of the Inglis River.

Side trip: There is a lovely riverbank loop walk/ride starting in Gutteridge gardens and follows the Inglis river up stream to a new bridge crossing adjacent to the highway bridge. You then return to Wynyard on the opposite bank. About 12 km in total if you extend the walk/ride to the Fossil Cliffs.

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Tommeginne people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Development and future of the trail

There is potential to extend the rail trail on the abandoned rail corridor from Wynyard a further 50 km west to the quaint little town of Stanley under the famous “Nut”. This section of line veers away from the coast and passes through rich farming country and forest before meeting the coast again for the final 1 kilometre into Stanley. This final part of the old rail corridor has been developed by the local council into a popular walking track.

Rail line history

The railway line west from Burnie was developed in various stages ultimately linking Stanley (then an important port) to Burnie around 1920. The line was principally to support farming and forestry industries in the far north-west of Tasmania.

Dwindling freight on the line saw the progressive closure of sections in the late 1980s resulting in the closure of the entire line by 1996. In 1999, the line was briefly re-opened to support fertiliser and log transport from Wiltshire Junction to and from Burnie. This was not financially viable and was plagued with line maintenance issues particularly on the section between Burnie and Wynyard due to sand dune movement over the line and shoreline erosion from heavy storms. The line closed again in 2003 and despite intermittent interest in re-opening the line, the general consensus has been that the cost of bringing the line up to railway safety standards and maintaining the infrastructure would be prohibitive.

Ever since the closure of the line west from Burnie, there have been calls to “re-purpose” this rail corridor for commuter and recreational use. Over the last 10 years, this has developed into a broader concept of building a long Coastal Pathway across the entire north west coast of Tasmania that would incorporate the disused rail corridor as well as linking up a number of small sections of shared pathways that had been developed largely by local councils using funds from a variety of government programs at local, state and federal level.

Delays have arisen due to the complexities of engaging with and reaching consensus with six different local councils as well as changing state governments and the necessary legislation to gain access to the old rail corridor. Additionally, resolving the responsibility for ongoing maintenance particularly in areas prone to erosion and storm damage has been a significant barrier to overcome. These issues appear to have been largely resolved with construction now started on a number of the missing links, upgrading some older sections of pathway and commencement of the rail trail extending the Coastal pathway to Wynyard.

The rail line east from Burnie to Devonport remains in active use particularly in relation to container transport to and from the Port of Burnie. Safety regulations for narrow rail and road corridors in active use (particularly around Round Hill and Penguin) and how the Coastal pathway can be accommodated in that space are yet to be resolved.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • The Goods Line offers a refuge from the busy Sydney CBD. It is a linear park and green space with public seating, performance areas, lawns, table tennis tables and items of railway heritage, and has won many design awards

Attractions

  • The Goods Line passes the University of Technology (UTS) campus, ABC studios, Ian Thorpe Aquatic Centre, Darling Harbour and the Powerhouse Museum

Trail Guide

Stage 1 of the Goods Line can be reached from Central Railway Station’s Devonshire St pedestrian tunnel in the south, and at various points along its route to the Powerhouse Museum in the north. There are displays and relics along the route that showcase railway heritage, including Ultimo Rd’s heritage railway bridge.

The Line can be ridden, but for such a short length with so many features, a slow stroll is better.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Gadigal people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

The port facilities at Darling Harbour closed and the precinct was extensively redeveloped in the 1980s. The disused industrial line between Hay St Ultimo and Lilyfield was incorporated into a light rail line that extended through Haymarket to connect to Central Station.

The light rail has been extended to Dulwich Hill and is known as the Sydney Light Rail L1 Dulwich Hill Line. A trip on the light rail and an exploration around some of its stops , especially around John St Square in Pyrmont, where there are some deep stone cuttings, is worthwhile for those interested in railway heritage.

Future developments may include an extension to the disused Regent St railway station, using the rail tunnel beneath Railway Square.

Rail line history 

The Goods Line is a short section of a former industrial railway that connected Sydney Yard and the Sydney-Parramatta railway line to the port of Darling Harbour. The line opened in 1855 and was extended to Dulwich Hill in 1922, providing a way for freight trains to reach Darling Harbour without interfering with passenger trains. Cargoes included wheat and wool. 

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • The EDRT is a challenging ~15km walk or cycle beside the Puffing Billy steam railway in the Dandenong Ranges.
  • The trail extends from Clematis through Emerald and Cockatoo to Gembrook.
  • The terrain varies from undulating to hilly on different surfaces (sealed, gravel, dirt) so it is most suitable for hybrid and MTB bikes.
  • The scenery is spectacular, changing regularly along the trail with outstanding forests & lake, farmland and villages.

Attractions

  • The lovely country villages of Emerald, Cockatoo and Gembrook have full facilities available.
  • Emerald Lake, Wright Forest and mountain farms are highlights along the way

Trail Guide

  • This trail follows the Puffing Billy steam railway through the Dandenong Ranges from Clematis/Emerald to Gembrook
  • Whilst only 15km long, this trail offers a full range of experiences for users – hills, forests, farms, rural villages, picnic facilities, heritage railway.
  • It does not follow the follow the railway in some locations and has steeper gradients.

Section Guides

Access Points
* Car Park of Paradise Hotel in Clematis
* Ample on-street parking in Emerald, Cockatoo and Gembrook
* Car Park at Emerald Lake Park (fees applicable)
* Many other parking & access points along the trail

Clematis to Emerald (3km):
* Unofficial start of the trail is at the Paradise Hotel in Clematis
* Trail originates eastern end of the car park
* Pass along a short section of trail before crossing both the railway and Edenmont Road
* Trail follows on the north side of the railway up Emerald Bank (if you’re lucky, you’ll see Puffing Billy working very hard up this climb) and across Pinnocks Road & the railway.
* Trail is interrupted at Belgrave-Gembrook Road – travellers can cross the road to enter Emerald Station Park (south side of railway) or use the road, turn right at the roundabout (Kilvington Drive) to enter the main street of Emerald.
* Note the many shops & eateries including the famous Emerald Village Bakery
* Official start of trail is on Kilvington Drive at the Gemco Theatre, at the far end of Emerald Station Park (on north side of railway).

Emerald to Emerald Lake (3km):
* Follow the blue signs with yellow arrows along the trail
* After a short distance, cross into Pepi’s Land on the south side of railway
* At Beaconsfield-Emerald Road, cross the railway (again) and road, taking care as it can be very busy.
* Follow the trail past the Emerald museum and down to the Nobelius Packing Shed (previously used for flower distribution but now the home of Puffing Billy’s night train dining experience)
* On entry to Emerald Lake Park, the recommended trail is to the left, down a steep zig-zag section and turn right at the T-junction.
* Follow this trail into the western car park of Emerald Lake reserve.
* Continue along the northern bank of Emerald Lake until arrival at the road intersection (Wombat Corner).

Emerald Lake to Cockatoo (5km):
* From Wombat Corner, pass beside the gate onto a beautiful, fern-lined trail that follows Wattle Creek, before crossing a sweeping bridge to arrive at Wright Road.
* Cross Wright Road and follow the trail to the right until the railway is crossed again, this time at the restored Wright Station.
* Pass through the gates to the left and follow the management road, Wright Track, into the Wright Forest
* Stay on Wright Track until a gate – turn left onto Boundary Track before the gate and follow it, past another couple of gates, down the steep incline to Baker Street.
* Turn left at Baker Street, down another steep incline to cross the bridge over Cockatoo Creek.
* Continue on the trail to Cockatoo, arriving at the Ash Wednesday Bushfire Education Centre, after crossing Bailey Road
* Continue on the trail along Bailey Road, across Healesville-Koo Wee Rup Road and the railway to enter the Cockatoo shopping precinct.

Cockatoo to Gembrook (6km):
* The trail continues along Fairbridge Lane, past the new IGA supermarket, to join the main road, Belgrave-Gembrook Road.
* The trail passes through Cockatoo beside Belgrave-Gembrook Road, past the Cockatoo Primary School and into Old Gembrook Road.
* Continue along the trail until Doonaha Road where the trail meets the railway again, at the restored station, Fielder.
* Cross the often-busy Belgrave-Gembrook Road with care and continue on the trail beside Fielder Road.
* Another crossing of B-G Road is needed at the Mapleridge Local Produce Centre (small market of local produce).
* The trail now follows the Puffing Billy Railway all the way to Gembrook.
* Continue on the trail from Mapleridge with spectacular views over the rich farming country in all directions
* At the top of the hill, just after the crossing at Orchard Road, is the Gembrook Sports Ground and the final trail crossing of railway.
* Continue on the trail and again cross B-G Road at the Gembrook outskirts
* Follow the trail along the southern side of the railway along Station Road where the trail ends at Main Street, Gembrook.
* Note the Eastern terminus of the Puffing Billy Railway, Gembrook Station, on the left of the trail.
* Unfortunately, the Gembrook Hotel burned down recently, but there are many shops & cafes available in Gembrook, all on the main street.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
The Hume Council have transformed this former railway line into a four hectare open community space and called it "Meadowlink Linear Park".

Attractions

  • The council has installed a 1.3 kilometre long concrete shared pathway 3.3 meters wide, 400 new shade trees, 500 plants, seating and lighting to help with public safety.
  • The Victorian Government contributed over $2 million for design and construction.

Trail Guide

This rail trail runs between Railway Crescent Broadmeadows (near its intersection with King William Street) and the Merlynston Creek.

From this point a shared pathway leads to the historic Will Will Rook Pioneer Cemetery on Camp Road and beyond through the Jack Roper Reserve to the popular shared pathway beside the Western Ring Road.

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Woiworung people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Railway history

This is the former World War 2 branch line called the “Broadstore Line” that ran for 1.6 kilometres from the main north/ south line at Broadmeadows (a northern suburb of Melbourne) in 1942, in an easterly direction providing services to the Maygar Army Barracks in Cambellfield. These barracks played and important part in housing troops and Army support during WW1 and WW2. The line was un-electrified and closed in 1982 with the lines being lifted in 1991.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • A short, high quality trail of 8km in length that passes through the regional centre of Mount Gambier
  • Links tourist attractions and facilities
  • Commercial centre is 400 m from the trail
  • Flat, with easy street crossing

Attractions

  • Many tourist features, including Umpherston Sinkhole and Cave Garden
  • Old rail yards have been converted into a landscaped civic centre where community events and markets are held regularly
  • The railway station has been restored and is used for community activities
  • The extinct volcanic region of Mt Gambier is less than 2 km south of the trail. The crater region contains Blue Lake, Valley Lake, a playground, walking trails and a caravan park

Trail Guide

The trail runs east-west through the city of Mt Gambier with its focal point being the former rail yards and railway station, which have been transformed into parklands and play areas while retaining much railway memorabilia.

The trail begins at the Blue Lake Sports Park, passes Umpherston Sinkhole and then progresses to the centre of the city and the railway station precinct. 

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Buandig people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

 

Development and future of the rail trail 

The trail has recently been extended to Wandilo Road and in late 2021 a shared use path will be built along Wireless Rd. 

The trail will have solar lighting installed in 2021-22.

 

Railway history

The railway line to Mount Gambier was originally part of South Australian Railways (SAR) narrow gauge network. Opened in stages from 1881, it reached Mt Gambier in 1887 and connected with the broad-gauge Adelaide-Melbourne line at Wolseley. It was also a junction for the line to Millicent and Beachport.

The SAR line to Mt Gambier and Millicent was converted to broad gauge in the 1950s.

Mt Gambier also had a broad-gauge connection with Heywood, Victoria, which opened in 1917. Mt Gambier had two goods yards and a locomotive depot and roundhouse.Passenger services to Adelaide ended in December 1990, and the line officially closed in April 1995. Some of the line was used by the Limestone Coast Railway tourist service, but this ceased operations in June 2006.

When the land was given to the community by the SA Government, the City of Mount Gambier repurposed the site into a public green space.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Mount Gambier Rail Trail will see the light

Posted: 16/04/21

The Mount Gambier Rail Trail in South Australia is to become an even better ...

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Mount Gambier’s rail trail is a blooming success

Posted: 15/03/21

Over the past decade the City of Mount Gambier in South Australia, with assistance from ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • A short trail for all the family that follows the tram line from Adelaide to the coastal beach area of Glenelg
  • The trail moves through suburban Adelaide but avoids most main roads and busy areas. 
  • Main road crossings are controlled by traffic lights
  • Interesting artwork
  • Flat with the exception of street overpasses that are easy to climb
  • Adelaide’s busiest cycle route; as used as a commuter route in mornings and evenings 

Attractions

  • Starts in Adelaide’s parklands and ends on coastal beaches
  • Beachside suburb of Glenelg has a great range of eateries
  • 8 km from Adelaide CBD the trail intersects with the Sturt River Linear Park Trail,  which heads south to for 12 km to link with the Patrick Jonker Veloway
  • At the junction with the Sturt River Linear Park Trail you can travel north over Anzac Highway to join the Westside Rail Trail, which leads back to Adelaide CBD
  • Ends at Glenelg Beach, where it joins the coast park, a 28 km trail along Adelaide’s beach frontage

Trail Guide

Overall description

The trail has two sections and crosses several busy roads, either through controlled crossings or by overpasses. It is an enjoyable ride that links cyclists with several other trails and ultimately with Adelaide’s coastline.

Section Guides

South Terrace (Adelaide Parklands) to South Road Overpass (4km)

  • From South Tce the trail runs between the tram line and Peacock Rd to Greenhill Rd; crossed at traffic lights to the western side of King William Rd
  • Continues on the footpath for a short distance before moving away from the road to following the tram line as a dedicated shared-use path.
  • The trail follows the tramline through to Goodwood Rd which can be crossed at the pedestrian crossing to Railway Tce
  • The 900 m section of the trail from Greenhill Rd to Musgrave St is being upgraded and widened 
  • The trail follows Railway Tce until it turns left and becomes Devon St;   turn right and ride through the tunnel beneath the tram overpass, then turn immediately left and ride a short distance to the end of the street where you turn right and walk your bike to the Railway Station subway beneath the train line to the reserve. Turn left to the tram overpass and veer right, following the path to Ethel St/Norman Tce to the pedestrian crossing on Leah St.
  • The trail is then a well-defined shared use path along the edge of the tram line. After a short distance, the South Rd overpass provides good views of the city

 

South Road Overpass to Brighton Road, Glenelg ( 6km) 

  • About 500 m from the South Rd overpass, cross the tram line at the pedestrian crossing at stop 7 Glandore. Walk your bike and look out for trams
  • The trail continues as a shared-use path to the pedestrian crossing on Marion Rd and the pedestrian crossing at Cross Rd.. Watch out for the ‘bike chain people’ artwork
  • Over the Morphett Rd pedestrian crossing point you will see the Sturt River concrete channel. On the other side of this the path continues along the tram line but there is also a bike path to the right that takes cyclists over the tram line to Anzac Highway and then on to the Westside Rail Trail back to the city. The bike path on the left is the 12 km Sturt River Cycle Path, which extends to the Southern Expressway and the Patrick Jonker Veloway
  • Continue on the shared use path as it follows the tram line to Glenelg. Watch out for the giraffe beside the path!
  • The trail ends at Brighton Rd, where you use the pedestrian crossing to continue along Jetty Rd to the beach or, if Jetty Rd is too busy, Augusta St 200m to the north.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Kaurna people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

 

Development and future of the rail trail 

The trail is continually being redeveloped and refined. The most recent works involve the reconstruction of a 900 m section of the trail from South Tce (City Parklands edge) southward along the tram line.

Future planned works involve a cycle and pedestrian overpass above Goodwood Railway Station, expected to begin in 2021-22.

 

Railway history 

In August 1873 the Adelaide, Glenelg and Suburban Railway Company opened a line between Adelaide and Glenelg, on the route of the present tramway.

In May 1880, the private company ‘Holdfast Railway Company opened the Holdfast Bay Line from Adelaide Railway Station to Glenelg. The two rail lines ran parallel with each other, separated by a few suburbs. Both lines were soon in financial trouble and merged to form the Glenelg Railway Company on 11 May 1882.

The two lines were now almost viable as they were able to rationalise and share rolling stock.

In December 1899, the ‘Glenelg Railway Company’ was acquired by the South Australian Railways, which continued to operate the Adelaide to Glenelg line as a steam railway until 1929 when the tracks were rebuilt and electrified for tram operation. The Adelaide Railway Station to Glenelg line was removed in 1929.

Growth in the number of buses resulted in a decline in patronage and growing losses for the tram line. By the 1950s Adelaide’s network of trams had disappeared with the exception of the Adelaide to Glenelg line, primarily due to the line being constructed on its own rail reserve, providing faster travelling times and minimal interference with road traffic.

The Adelaide to Glenelg tram is operational today and the Adelaide tram network is beginning to grow again.

 

Naming of the Trail

The Mike Turtur Trail was named after local cyclist Michael Turtur, who competed in the Olympic Games and three Commonwealth Games, winning a total of five medals. He was race director for the Tour Down Under from inception in 1999 to 2020 and in In 2018 Mr Turtur was made an Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) for distinguished service to cycling, particularly through the development and promotion of world-class road cycling events, and to the community of South Australia.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Mike Turtur Bikeway in South Australia receives a $28m boost to improve safety

Posted: 06/07/21

The State Government has announced that a bridge for cyclists and pedestrians will be constructed ...

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Mike Turtur Bikeway Rail Side Trail Upgrade (South Australia)

Posted: 16/10/20

South Australia's Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure in partnership with the City of Unley ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Short walking trail situated 2 km from Buderim town centre
  • Follows an old narrow gauge (2' 6") tramway through bushland
  • The trail is suitable for walkers only.
 

Attractions

This is a well-maintained walking path in the Buderim region of the Sunshine Coast.

The general standard of this trail is good, but care must be taken during wet weather due to slippery pathways.

 

 

 

Trail Guide

Access to this trail is on the corner of Mons and Telco Road, Buderim  (2 km from Buderim Town Centre), with parking on the left hand side of  Telco Road. The path down to the trail is on the right hand side of Telco road and is well sign posted.

The site of the original Telco Station is about 100m towards Buderim from the parking area. From the entrance it is all downhill to the Mons Station site (1100m from the start) and the trail continues on to Liana Place (2km) which is the current end of this trail.

Personal mobility vehicles would be able to access the first 800m. The entrance has a sealed zig zag path,while the rest is compacted earth.

There are no water bubblers or toilet facilities on this trail.

Background Information

Traditional Owners 

We acknowledge the Gubbi Gubbi people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Railway History

This Tramway was built to narrow guage (2’6″) and left the QGR at Palmwoods Station.

No part of the orginal line remains, but there are some sleepers still visible on the walking trail.

The part of the current QR line that runs behind the Palmwoods station is known as the Buderim Loop.

Station along this line were Chevallum, ForestGlen, Mons , Telco, Glenmount and Buderim. There was a siding with a crane called Guys Siding near the Buderim end of the line.

The first train ran on 1st December 1914 and the line was officially opened on the 15 th June 1915.

It was closed on 10th August 1935.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Come and enjoy the Buderim Tramway Centenary June 20 (S.E. QLD)

Posted: 05/06/15

Buderim-Palmwoods Heritage Tramway walk will be celebrating their Centenary on 20 June 2015. Celebrations will include unveiling ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • A safe and convenient way to walk and ride in this area of Geelong
  • Some views of the Moorabool River valley from the Fyansford end.

Trail Guide

  •  The trail starts at Douro St, near the North Geelong Station. It is also called the Tom McKean Linear Park.
  • The sealed trail runs through various urban backdrops linking up small parklands.

For awhile the remains of the cement works at Fyansford were of interest to those interested in industrial heritage and the tall silos high on the bluff featured artwork that was visible for kilometres. These were demolished in 2020.

Background Information

The line was conceived by the cement company, who approached the State Government in 1915-16 requesting a rail link to North Geelong. In 1926 the Australian Portland Cement Company opened a private 3’6″ railway  to their quarry. Usage of the line declined by the 1990’s as road haulage took over. The cement plant closed in 2000 and was demolished.

A bike path and linear park was provided beside the tracks in the early 1980s.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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