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Boyne Burnett Inland Rail Trail - Trail Description

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Trail

Boyne Burnett Inland Rail Trail

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Type: Rail trail
Location: Central Queensland (Gladstone and North Burnett Regions)
Start/end: Gayndah to Taragoola
Status: Possible
Length open: 0km
Surface: Compacted earth
Terrain: Flat to very hilly
Best seasons: All Year
Contact Region: S.E. Queensland
One of the many significant bridges between Gayndah and Mundubbera. (Mike Goebel 2014)
One of the many significant bridges between Gayndah and Mundubbera. (Mike Goebel 2014)
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Details

Features

This rail trail is not yet open.

269km of rail corridor is being evaluated for possible conversion to rail trail in central Queensland.

The corridor traverses a wide range of landscapes with pricturesque and very spectacular sections, some of which contain heritage listed infrastructure.

Description

Community groups from Gladstone to Maryborough began lobbying government in 2012 to make use of the disused corridor from Taragoola (near Gladstone), through the Boyne Valley, on to Monto, Eidsvold, Mundubbera and south through Gayndah. . 

Early in 2018 “Boyne Burnett Inland Rail Trail Inc.” was formed, challenged with facilitating development of the rail corridor. The Gladstone and North Burnett Regional Councils have been successful in obtaining funding to have a feasibility study prepared for the 269km rail corridor from Gayndah to Taragoola.

The feasibility study commenced in October 2018 and is due for completion in mid 2019.  It is the longest rail trail feasibility study in Australia!

Two sections are particularly noteworthy

  • The 37km Gayndah to Mundubbera “Burnett River” section, which is quite close to the river in places and has a remarkable number of heritage listed bridges, which have also been recognised by Engineers Australia.
  • The 74km Monto to Builyan section is very picturesque with the part from Kalpowar down the Dawes Range to Many Peaks being particularly spectacular. Near Kalpowar there are six tunnels in quick succession and magnificent views to be enjoyed.

The increasing support of the Queensland Government can be seen in the actions of the Transport and Main Roads Department who are actively seeking solutions to retain particularly critical bridges on some sections of the corridor, which will make those sections of the rail trail feasible, and enjoyable.

Permission is required from Queensland Rail to enter the corridor from Monto to Taragoola.

Background Information

Over many decades the Queensland Railways constructed an inland railway loop that extended from Mungar (south of Maryborough) to near Gladstone via Monto; a total of 406km! The first section from Mungar opened in 1889 and the last section to join Monto from Gladstone opened over four decades later in 1931. 

It is understood that the last regular train ran in 2002 and the last train was a steam special in 2008.

The 125km Mungar to Gayndah track is still in place as Isis Sugar has expressed an interest in possibly using it.

The rail tracks have been removed from near Gayndah to Monto and Kalpowar. The tracks from Builyan to Calliope are currently being removed.

Links

Boyne Burnett Inland Rail Trail Inc.

Gayndah Mundubbera Engineering Heritage Bridges Detail

October 2018

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Contact Us About This Trail

Email or click here: qld@railtrails.org.au.

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News

News

Boyne Burnett Inland Rail Trail Report Released

(Posted: 23/05/19)

Discussions are continuing between community groups, local councils and TMR to develop a long rail trail in Central Queensland.

More...