Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
This short, attractive pathway is a popular off-road cycle route. Views are mainly bush with some rural residential housing. Signage reveals items and locations of historical significance, particularly relating to the mining history of the area, including tragedies such as the deaths of 96 miners and rescuers in a coal mine explosion in 1902. There is also information on cutting of red cedar timber. The pathway ends at the site of the former Nebo Colliery’s Bradford breaker building. 
  • The top section of the pathway is suitable for walkers and mountain bikes only.

Attractions

  • The historic Mount Kembla Village Hotel
  • Soldiers and Miners Memorial Church
  • Relics from the American Creek kerosene works
  • Lookouts, walking tracks and tourist drives of the Illawarra escarpment
  • Many beaches and Lake Illawarra
  • Good cycling options, including railside trails, to Wollongong or Pt Kembla
  • City of Wollongong

Trail Guide

The trail can be accessed from: 

  • A small carpark southeast of 200 Cordeaux Rd
  • Carpark and monument on Stones Rd
  • Kirkwood Place

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Dharawal people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail

The Pathway was completed in stages, with the final Stage 3 to the Bradford breaker site completed in October 2016.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
The Manjimup Linear Path is a short, high-quality rail trail located in the south west town of Manjimup. Manjimup is known for its undulating land, tall timbers, abundant fresh water and rich soils.

Attractions

  • Manjin Park, which includes a barbecue area and skate park
  • Manjimup Heritage Park, which includes Manjimup Historic Hamlet, State Timber Museum, PowerUp! Electricity Museum and a children’s playground with a 17 m tall slide
  • Other attractions in and around Manjimup including Fontys Pool, Diamond Tree Lookout and One Tree Bridge

Trail Guide

This trail runs from Manjimup Heritage Park near Graphite Road to the southern edge of town at Seven Day Road. The linear path is built on a disused section of the Northcliffe Branch Railway (also known as the Picton to Northcliffe line). The path is paved and suitable for people of all ages and abilities.

The linear path also provides a connection to the nearby Manjimup to Deanmill Heritage Trail. Forming a ‘T’, the two rail trails intersect in the centre of Manjimup just south Ipsen Street.

Background Information

Traditional owners

Rail Trails Australia acknowledge the Murrum people of the Noongar Nation, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which this rail trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

Manjimup Linear Path officially opened in 2018 as part of the Manjimup Town Centre Revitalisation project. The Shire of Manjimup 2017-2027 Local Bicycle and Footpath Plan mentions the possibility of extending the trail south to Pemberton or north to Bridgetown.

Rail line history 

Construction of the Picton to Northcliffe railway began in 1887, with the line reaching Manjimup in 1911 and Northcliffe in 1933. The area around Manjimup developed quickly following the establishment of the Group Settlement Scheme in the 1920s. The line ceased operation in the early 2000s. In recent years there have been calls to reopen the line between Picton and Greenbushes to transport lithium ore from the Talison Lithium mine to processing facilities near Bunbury.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • The trail is a pleasant path along the old rail reserve. It has easy grades and is ideal for children and novice riders. 
  • Centenary Gardens features an old rail weighbridge complete with gangers’ trolley, railway signal, BBQ and picnic facilities, playground and toilets.

Attractions

  •   Old station building
  •   Silo art
  •   Rural town scenery
  •   Lavender Federation Walking Trail access
  •   Murray to Clare Lavender Cycling Trail (M2C) access

Trail Guide

The Eudunda Rail Trail features a smooth fine gravel surface of good width. It is South Australia’s shortest rail trail but is a handy off-road link for cyclists, walkers and runners. Two of SA’s long distance trails, the Lavender Federation Walking Trail and the M2C Lavender Cycling Trail, pass along this trail. 

There are coffee shops, bakery and supermarket in the nearby main street, and toilets and picnic facilities at Centenary Gardens.

Section Guides

Worlds End Hwy to Thiele Hwy (0.6km)

The trail starts opposite the Centenary Gardens on Worlds End Hwy and runs through the station yard alongside the old platform. The stone station building is intact but in poor condition. East of the station the trail passes between a large iron elevated tank and a water standpipe. Grain silos opposite the station have been decorated with ‘silo-art’.

Head east across South Tce and continue behind houses until the trail leaves the railway embankment and terminates at a pedestrian crossing on Thiele Hwy.

 

Side Trails

Centenary Gardens

Opposite the trail start point on Worlds End Hwy, a paved footpath leads into Centenary Gardens past a rail weighbridge with a gangers’ trolley on display. Adjacent is a children’s playground and free BBQ facilities with public toilets beyond that. A bronze statue pays tribute to author Colin Thiele who grew up in this area.

 

Lavender Federation Walking Trail

The Lavender Trail extends south to Murray Bridge and northwest to Clare and is well signposted.

 

M2C Lavender Cycling Trail

The M2C Lavender Cycling Trail extends south to Murray Bridge and northwest to Clare using mostly unsealed roads and tracks. It is not signposted but maps and directions can be downloaded.

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Ngadjuri people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Development and Future of the Rail Trail 

The trail takes advantage of the old railway reserve to provide an off-road link between the centre of town and the showgrounds/oval area to the east.

There have been proposals to extend the rail trail north to Hampden but there are currently no extensions planned.

Rail Line History 

The first section of the line from Gawler to Kapunda was opened in 1860. It was extended via Eudunda to Morgan in 1878 to provide a more efficient freight and passenger connection between the Murray paddle steamers and both the city of Adelaide and Port Adelaide for ocean transport. 

The Eudunda to Morgan section closed in 1969 and the line removed not long after. The Kapunda to Eudunda section was closed in 1994 and was pulled up the following year.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Pleasant path along a linear park on the old rail reserve It has easy grades, ideal for children and novice riders
  • Davidson Reserve features a large duck pond, picnic facilities and toilets
  • Historic copper mines nearby

Attractions

  •   Mining history
  •   Rural scenery
  •   Access to Mawson, Heysen and Kidman Trails

Trail Guide

The Kapunda Rail Trail features a smooth hot-mix surface of good width. It is SA’s  second shortest rail trail but is well used by cyclists, walkers and runners, especially before and after school. All three of SA’s major long distance trails, Mawson (cycling), Heysen (hiking) and Kidman (horse riding/multi-use) pass along or cross this trail. 

There are coffee shops, bakery and restaurants in the nearby main street, and toilets and picnic facilities at Davidson Reserve.

Section Guides

Coghill Street to High Street (0.8 km)

The trail starts on the western side of the Davidson Reserve duck pond  on Coghill Street. Some rail remnants are visible adjacent to the path, and the level crossing on Coghill St is intact. An old pumphouse building alongside the trail was used to pump water from the dam for use by steam trains. 

Head north along the linear park, taking care at the two road crossings.

A short diversion to Hill St reveals the Lions Playground Park, complete with an old Rx Class steam locomotive. Adjacent Kapunda swimming pool is nearby in Beck St.

 

Side Trails

Old Station

To the south of the duck pond, an unsealed road leads to the old station, which is quite grand by country standards and has been kept in good condition and used as a B&B in recent years. Much of the rail and yard infrastructure is still in place.

 

Rattler and Riesling Rail Trails

The southern end of the Rattler and Riesling Rail Trails can be reached at Riverton, about 30 km northwest of Kapunda, by road or via the Mawson Trail.

 

Barossa Rail Trail

The Barossa Rail Trail can be reached at Nuriootpa, 22 km southeast of Kapunda, by road or via the Mawson Trail.

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Kaurna people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Development and Future of the Rail Trail 

While informal trails have existed within the railway reserve for decades, it is only since the line closure and removal of the tracks that attractive linear path and sealed rail trail has been established.

The Swann Path Kapunda Rail Trail opened in 2015. There are plans to extend the trail south 1.5 km to Bethel Rd and it is hoped the Kapunda Trail will eventually form part of a future Wine Capital Trail which will run from the Clare Valley to McLaren Vale via the Barossa Valley and Adelaide Hills wine regions.

Rail Line History 

Kapunda became the first mining town in South Australia soon after copper was discovered in 1842. Mining began in 1844 and continued until 1879, when world copper prices fell. Although copper was mined for only a brief period, revenue from its sales saved South Australia from bankruptcy.

When the railway opened in 1860, Kapunda became the rural centre for the Mid-North of the State. The first section of the line from Gawler to Kapunda was built to serve the mines and opened in August 1860. It was extended to Morgan in 1878 to provide a more efficient freight and passenger connection between the Murray paddle steamers and both the city of Adelaide and Port Adelaide for ocean transport. 

The Eudunda to Morgan section closed in 1969, and the line was removed not long after. The Kapunda to Eudunda section was closed in 1994, with the deterioration of the River Light bridge at Hansborough cited as a reason for closure. This section was pulled up the following year. The remaining Gawler to Kapunda section was leased by the SA Government to Australian Southern Railroad in 1997 as part of AN’s SA freight asset sale to Genesee and Wyoming. While it theoretically remains open, it has not been used for many years. 

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Scenic ride or walk along the old rail reserve between Renmark and Paringa, avoiding the busy Sturt Highway
  • Easy grades, ideal for children and novice riders 
  • Access points for many MTB trails, water sports and other highlights
  • Watch the lifting span of the historic Paringa Bridge in operation to allow large vessels to pass
  • Side trips to Lock 5 or Murtho or follow the scenic Renmark riverfront path

Attractions

  •   Wine and fruit-growing area
  •   River towns
  •   Historic Paringa Bridge
  •   MTB trail access
  •   Water sports
  •   Irrigation history
  •   Historic paddle steamer

Trail Guide

The Renmark-Paringa Rail Trail features a smooth hot-mix surface of adequate width. It is a popular trail, particularly at holiday times, as it provides safe access to two main caravan parks and both towns. 

The Paringa Bridge lifting span operates daily at 9:30 am and 2:30 pm and is best viewed from Bert Dix Memorial Park. Make sure you are positioned on the side you want to be before the span lifts; it can be a long wait.

  • Coffee shops, bakeries and restaurants in Renmark and Paringa
  • Toilets and picnic facilities at Bert Dix Memorial Park

Section Guides

Nineteenth St to Patey Drive (2.0 km)

The trail starts off Nineteenth St opposite the Renmark Plaza shopping centre. Parking is available on-street or in the shopping centre car park. There is a BMX track, playground, picnic facilities and toilets close to the trail start.

 

The first section to Para St is paved; the remainder is hot mix. After crossing Para St the trail turns left and then parallels Eighteenth St/Sturt Highway. This area was once the railway station and freight yards; now it is a housing estate and Council offices. Just past the Council offices an old railway crane sits alone, the sole remnant of the station precinct.

 

Great care is required crossing the Sturt Highway as this is a major interstate freight route. The trail then passes behind houses on the edge of town with the highway to the right. At 1.8 km a ramp to the left allows access to the riverfront trail. Immediately following are the first two of four railway bridges over swampy waterways. Another ramp just after the second bridge accesses a trail that passes beneath the bridge, leading to Paringa Paddock and its many MTB and walking trails.

 

Patey Drive crosses the trail and is the highway access point for the Renmark Riverfront Caravan Park. Near the caravan park entrance are public toilets, BBQ and picnic facilities, river access and a boat ramp, and a boardwalk across shallow water to a small island for birdwatching. The caravan park café/kiosk is accessible from Patey Dr.

 

Patey Drive to Paringa (1.9 km)

A signposted gravel road 250 m beyond Patey Dr leads to the Paringa Paddock trails. Take care crossing the highway.

 

There are two more railway bridges to cross before the Paringa Bridge comes into view. Approaching the western end of the bridge, cross the entrance road to the Riverbend Caravan Park and the eastbound carriageway of the highway to reach the bridge’s central cycle path. 

 

Paringa Bridge was built in 1927 as a multi-use bridge over the Murray, with vehicles sharing the central passage with the railway. Later, outrigger vehicle decks were added to either side, leaving just the railway in the centre corridor. This is now the cycle path, necessitating crossing the eastbound lane of the highway at both ends of the bridge. The lifting span is close to the Paringa end of the bridge

Leaving the bridge on the eastern side, cross the highway again to reach the remaining trail into Paringa. On the left you will see a museum and also some silo art. The trail finishes on a service road close to the Paringa store and post office. Paringa also has a bakery café, the Black Stump Gallery and a hotel.

 

Side Trails

Renmark Riverfront Trail (3.3 km)

The Renmark Riverfront Trail follows the western bank of the river from the Riverfront Caravan Park. It diverges through a housing estate briefly before returning to the river.

The Visitor Information Centre is opposite the Renmark Hotel. Bike hire is available through the Information Centre, best booked in advance by phone or online. The paddle steamer Industry is moored behind the Information Centre and has regular passenger steaming days.

Continuing north, the trail drops to river level as it passes in front of the Renmark Club before climbing back to street level before the old wharf area. The central shopping area is to the left and has bakeries, cafes and other shops.

The trail continues through shady parks to the main irrigation pumping station.

 

Paringa Paddock MTB Trails

Paringa Paddock is easily reached from the rail trail and has a number of walking and MTB trails. Maps can be obtained online or from the Visitor Information Centre in Renmark. Trails are a mix of single track and unsealed roads. 

 

Lock 5 (1.7 km)

Lock 5 Rd can be reached from the eastern end of Paringa Bridge. Bert Dix Park has BBQs, toilets and picnic facilities. Continue on the lightly trafficked road past moored houseboats. Lock 5 and weir has well kept, shady grounds with a picnic area, BBQs and toilets. The historic barge Bunyip is displayed in the grounds and displays historical information and photographs about the barge and the locks.

 

Old Customs House (31 km)

Leave Paringa on Murtho Rd, uphill initially passing the scenic lookout on the left. Murtho Rd is sealed and lightly trafficked, though it does have a 100km/h speed limit. The terrain is mostly flat and passes irrigated orchards and open farmland. 

Headings Cliffs Lookout 12.5 km from Paringa has great views. It is 1 km off to the left on a sealed road.

Turn left 15 km from Paringa on to Wilkinson Rd to visit Wilkadine-Woolshed Brewery overlooking a bend in the Murray River. It is less than 1 km from Murtho Rd.

Approximately 26.5 km from Paringa, just past the intersection with Millewa Road and cattle grid, the route of the old Chowilla Dam railway crosses Murtho Rd. Little evidence remains of the old line.

Old Customs House was established in the late 1800s to levy excise on goods shipped into SA by Murray River steamers. Today it is a base for houseboats and has a general store, and is the stepping-off point for the Border Cliffs Wetlands Walk.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Meru people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

The Renmark–Paringa Rail Trail was built following closure and removal of the railway.

There are no plans to extend the trail through to Berri or Barmera at this stage.

Rail line history 

The Barmera line branched east at Tailem Bend from the main Adelaide to Melbourne line. It was opened to Paringa in 1913. World War I delayed construction of the Paringa Bridge and the railway to Renmark did not open until 1927. The line was extended to Barmera in 1928.  

The line closed west of Paringa in 1984 and tracks were removed by 1986.

In the 1960s, a branch line was built which joined the main line southeast of Paringa, near the Wonuarra siding. Built to support construction of the proposed Chowilla Dam, it was 27.3 km long and went northeast to Murtho to the south bank of the Murray. . Construction of the dam was cancelled in 1967; the rail line was removed without ever being used (though there are reports that one test train did run on the line). The route of the line is still visible using Google Earth.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • The rail trail will pass through a 15 km by 2 km strip of terra rossa soil that produces some of the world’s finest cabernet sauvignon. Cycling is the perfect way to enjoy this region; many wineries are located within 20 km of Coonawarra township and along the rail trail.
  • The trail will extend the Aussie Camino Trail that connects Portland, Victoria to Penola in recognition of Saint Mary MacKillop and Father Julian Tenison Woods. It will also be close to Naracoorte Caves (SA’s only UNESCO World Heritage site) and the Ramsar wetland sites of Bool and Hack Lagoons

Attractions

  • Coonawarra Wine Region
  • Historic Penola
  • The Aussie Camino Trail
  • Naracoorte Caves
  • Bool and Hack Lagoons 

Trail Guide

Important note: This rail trail is not yet open. It is expected construction will begin in 2022.

The trail will run for 20 km through the Coonawarra Wine Region vineyards and past wine cellars, some dating from 1890. Once the trail is open it is expected several side trails to cellar doors and wineries will be built.

The sealed trail will begin on the outskirts of Penola and follow the unused Wolseley to Mt Gambier rail corridor to end at Father Woods Park, home to seven sculptures depicting the lives of Father Julian Tenison Woods and Saint Mary MacKillop.

 

 

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Bindjali people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail will be built.

Development and future of the rail trail

The future Coonawarra Rail Trail will connect with a proposed Naracoorte Caves trail, creating a 50 km trail between Penola and Naracoorte and providing a mix of wine tourism trail with a bush trail along back roads, around wetlands and through conservation parks.

Rail line history 

The Wolseley to Mt Gambier railway line was built in stages between 1881 and 1887. The line was primarily used to transport farm produce to Adelaide, and closed in 1995.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Connects the inland town of Kadina with the coastal town of Wallaroo
  • Provides contrasting scenery from dryland interior to beaches
  • The proposed extension Moonta will add mining heritage and additional coastal scenery 

Attractions

  • Moonta Bay, Port Hughes and Wallaroo townships have extensive sandy beaches
  • Jetties and boat-launching facilities provide access to fishing
  • The area is rich in mining and agricultural history, with many museums
  • Moonta Mine Museum is a great family attraction and will connect with the proposed trail extension
  • The wealth generated by copper mining is reflected in the many late 1800s buildings
  • The biennial Kernewek Lowender festival celebrates the area’s strong Cornish heritage

Trail Guide

The Copper Coast Rail Trail connects the copper mines in Kadina (mine was called the Wallaroo Mine even though it is today within the township of Kadina) to the deep-sea jetty in the township of Wallaroo. The trail is within the original rail corridor and vegetation is confined to low dryland shrubs with the occasional taller tree. The path is in good condition and there are several shelters along the trail and facilities at each end.

Section Guides

Kadina to Wallaroo (8 km)

The rail trail begins in at Powell Terrace, not far from the main roundabout on the Copper Coast Highway. There is a shade shelter at this point; there are shops on the opposite side of the roundabout, and over the Copper Coast Highway.

When the trail crosses Lipsom St there are remnants of the Wallaroo mines on the left.

The trail continues through open country to the outskirts of Wallaroo to Wallaroo jetty.

 

Wallaroo to Moonta (proposed trail of around 18 km)

Construction on this section of the trail is expected to begin in 2021-22.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Narangga people, the traditional custodians of the lands and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Town naming

Wallaroo is derived from the Aboriginal term dharug walaru –a macropod, or medium-sized member of the marsupial family that includes kangaroos and wallabies.

Kadina is derived from the Aboriginal term kaddy-yeena – lizard plain.’

Moonta is derived from the Aboriginal term moonta-moonterra –‘impenetrable scrub.’

Development and future of the rail trail 

A rail trail connecting Wallaroo with Moonta is expected to begin construction in 2021-22.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • The 55km trail can start at either Castlemaine or Maryborough and follow the now disused rail line, via the towns of Guildford, Newstead and Carisbrook.
  • From a tourism perspective a unique feature of this trail would be that a traveller could take a train from Melbourne and head either to Castlemaine or Maryborough, traverse the trail to the other end and take a train back to Melbourne.

Attractions

  • A stand-out destination is the impressive Maryborough Railway Station once described by Mark Twain, the famous American writer, as ‘a railway station with a town attached ’.

Trail Guide

The rail corridor passes through an ancient volcanic plain landscape, crosses the Cairn Curran Reservoir and Moolort Plains, a very different environment to the goldfields landscapes closer to Castlemaine. A feature of the Plains is its wetlands and swamps, a habitat for a variety of wetland flora and birdlife. Several towns along the route are located on the Loddon River, which flows from the Great Dividing Range in the south to the Murray River in the north.

Section Guides

Castlemaine – Guildford (11km): This section of the rail trail passed through Castlemaine and Campbells Creek before reaching a more rural environment with low hills following the edge of an ancient volcanic flow and crossing the Loddon River at Guildford.

Guildford – Newstead (12km): The route continues through farmland and forested historic goldfields. Newstead is a small town along the Loddon River.

Newstead – Carisbrook (25km): The rail trail continues past cropping and grazing land and crosses the Cairn Curran reservoir and wetlands. The Moolort Plain is a flat ancient volcanic landscape, with low hills on the approach to Carisbrook, a town on the Loddon River.

Carisbrook – Maryborough (7km): This part of the trail passes through dry Box ironbark forest which formed part of the 19th Century goldfields in Central Victoria.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Dja Dja Wurrung people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Railway history

  • Castlemaine Station is on the Melbourne to Bendigo line and was established in 1862.
  • Maryborough Station is on the Melbourne to Mildura line and terminus for V/Line service from Ballarat. It opened in 1874 but the current station building was erected in 1890 with 25 rooms and a clock tower, of red brick with stucco trimming (excerpt from Wikipedia)
  • The Maryborough – Castlemaine passenger service was withdrawn in July 1977, being replaced with a bus service. From that time, the track was then used only for freight until 2004 when the line was closed

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Easy to access objects and plentiful signage
  • Walking distance from all the town’s accommodation
  • Best seen by walking but can be cycled

Attractions

  • Pine Creek Railway Museum

Trail Guide

Access points:

• Main Terrace or Millar Terrace
• Access to the rail bridge and reservoir is by walking over mown lawn areas with no distinct paths.

Note: The map is indicative. The paths in the Water Garden are actually loops, and there is no path from the rail yards to the bridge over the creek or the reservoir. The line shown on the map is simply to inform you that the trail passes through the park and beyond to the creek.

Section Guides

The Pine Creek Railway Precinct was the initial terminus of an uncompleted 19th Century trans-continental railway system. Its contribution to the development of the mining boom in the late 19th Century was profound, enabling companies to transport machinery and equipment with greater ease to the mine fields than had been possible previously. It was also a catalyst for the opening of new mines in the area. Its contribution to the development of Pine Creek and other towns along its route was also important.

Pine Creek maintained its importance after the railway was extended to Katherine and during WWII when it became one of the four dispersal bases on the North Australian Railway. The area has high architectural and historical associations and remains a key feature in the township’s heritage and streetscape.

The adjacent Miners Park is important in that it provides a visible link between the railway and the mining industry which it contributed so much to. Its significance also lies in the fact that it provides a place where mining machinery and technology from mines, which are no longer operational or exist, can be maintained to assist in the interpretation of the area’s mining history.

The adjacent Water Gardens was developed over the former cutting of the rail extension to Katherine. It has some short walking paths and at the far end there remains a home signal tower.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the ________ people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Railway history

The first section of the narrow gauge North Australia Railway from Darwin to Pine Creek opened in 1888 to service mines in the area. It was extended south to Katherine in 1926 and finally Larrimah in 1929, which was as far south as it went, never linking up to the Adelaide to Alice Springs railway. Never-the-less, it played a vital role in the development of the Northern Territory and Australia during the WWII. However once the war was over, improving roads, its isolation, and finally damage to iron ore loading facilities at Darwin Port from Cyclone Tracy resulted in the railway being closed in 1976.

The new standard gauge Alice Springs – Darwin railway opened in 2004 and parts of the new railway were placed on the old North Australia Railway alignment. However, some parts of the old line were bypassed, including the section through Pine Creek town. Many parts of the railway have been declared heritage places, including the precinct itself and many of the separate items that remain.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
When completed, this 20km rail trail will connect the large inland NSW city of Wagga Wagga to the rural village of Ladysmith to the southeast. The trail will pass Wagga Wagga airport, running mainly through open country or lightly-wooded farmland. The trail is at the western end of the Riverina Highlands rail trail, with stage 1 between Tumbarumba and Rosewood at the eastern end now open. Wagga Wagga to Ladysmith is stage 2, and its construction may encourage further development of the remaining sections from Ladysmith to Tarcutta (on the Hume Highway) and on to Humula and Rosewood.    

Attractions

  • Wagga Wagga is a major inland city in New South Wales, situated on the Murrumbidgee River, and is the major regional centre for the Riverina
  • Ladysmith is a rural town with an extensive agricultural and railway history
  • The Riverina area offers a large range of tourism experiences
  • In the Wagga Wagga area, the trail will form part of the local bicycle network and will provide an off-road commuting option between the suburb of Forest Hill and the downtown area
  • Ladysmith station has a large display of railway heritage memorabilia

Trail Guide

The trail will commence in central Wagga Wagga, running along the disused ex-government branch line that once connected Wagga Wagga with Tumbarumba.

Access to the trail will be provided near the Wagga Wagga CBD and also at the Equex Centre sports complex, with links to the Kooringal Rd and Riverside cycleways.

The trail will end at the Ladysmith railway station trailhead.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Wiradjuri people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail will be built.

Development and future of the rail trail

The local rail trail group has been working for many years to promote this rail trail. The success of the Tumbarumba-Rosewood rail trail has provided a boost to their efforts. On 26th July 2021, Wagga Wagga Regional Council voted unanimously to support the development of rail trails in the Wagga Wagga region. This positive step will enable detailed planning to begin, with next steps expected in March 2022.

Railway History 

The Tumbarumba branch line from Wagga Wagga opened in 1917, passing through Ladysmith, Tarcutta, Humula, Rosewood and terminated at Tumbarumba.

Passenger services ceased on the line in 1974, and all operations on the line stopped in 1987.  The station at Ladysmith is the only surviving station structure on the rail corridor.

From Ladysmith, the rail corridor extends further east to Tarcutta, crossing the Hume Highway just to the south of the Tarcutta township. Remnants of the railway are visible from the highway.

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Wagga Wagga City Council votes to support rail trails

Posted: 31/07/21

Wagga Wagga City Council voted unanimously on 26 July to give in-principle support for the development ...

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