Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • The rail trail will pass through a 15 km by 2 km strip of terra rossa soil that produces some of the world’s finest cabernet sauvignon. Cycling is the perfect way to enjoy this region; many wineries are located within 20 km of Coonawarra township and along the rail trail.
  • The trail will extend the Aussie Camino Trail that connects Portland, Victoria to Penola in recognition of Saint Mary MacKillop and Father Julian Tenison Woods. It will also be close to Naracoorte Caves (SA’s only UNESCO World Heritage site) and the Ramsar wetland sites of Bool and Hack Lagoons

Attractions

  • Coonawarra Wine Region
  • Historic Penola
  • The Aussie Camino Trail
  • Naracoorte Caves
  • Bool and Hack Lagoons 

Trail Guide

Important note: This rail trail is not yet open. It is expected construction will begin in 2022.

The trail will run for 20 km through the Coonawarra Wine Region vineyards and past wine cellars, some dating from 1890. Once the trail is open it is expected several side trails to cellar doors and wineries will be built.

The sealed trail will begin on the outskirts of Penola and follow the unused Wolseley to Mt Gambier rail corridor to end at Father Woods Park, home to seven sculptures depicting the lives of Father Julian Tenison Woods and Saint Mary MacKillop.

 

 

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Bindjali people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail will be built.

Development and future of the rail trail

The future Coonawarra Rail Trail will connect with a proposed Naracoorte Caves trail, creating a 50 km trail between Penola and Naracoorte and providing a mix of wine tourism trail with a bush trail along back roads, around wetlands and through conservation parks.

Rail line history 

The Wolseley to Mt Gambier railway line was built in stages between 1881 and 1887. The line was primarily used to transport farm produce to Adelaide, and closed in 1995.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • The 55km trail can start at either Castlemaine or Maryborough and follow the now disused rail line, via the towns of Guildford, Newstead and Carisbrook.
  • From a tourism perspective a unique feature of this trail would be that a traveller could take a train from Melbourne and head either to Castlemaine or Maryborough, traverse the trail to the other end and take a train back to Melbourne.

Attractions

  • A stand-out destination is the impressive Maryborough Railway Station once described by Mark Twain, the famous American writer, as ‘a railway station with a town attached ’.

Trail Guide

The rail corridor passes through an ancient volcanic plain landscape, crosses the Cairn Curran Reservoir and Moolort Plains, a very different environment to the goldfields landscapes closer to Castlemaine. A feature of the Plains is its wetlands and swamps, a habitat for a variety of wetland flora and birdlife. Several towns along the route are located on the Loddon River, which flows from the Great Dividing Range in the south to the Murray River in the north.

Section Guides

Castlemaine – Guildford (11km): This section of the rail trail passed through Castlemaine and Campbells Creek before reaching a more rural environment with low hills following the edge of an ancient volcanic flow and crossing the Loddon River at Guildford.

Guildford – Newstead (12km): The route continues through farmland and forested historic goldfields. Newstead is a small town along the Loddon River.

Newstead – Carisbrook (25km): The rail trail continues past cropping and grazing land and crosses the Cairn Curran reservoir and wetlands. The Moolort Plain is a flat ancient volcanic landscape, with low hills on the approach to Carisbrook, a town on the Loddon River.

Carisbrook – Maryborough (7km): This part of the trail passes through dry Box ironbark forest which formed part of the 19th Century goldfields in Central Victoria.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Dja Dja Wurrung people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Railway history

  • Castlemaine Station is on the Melbourne to Bendigo line and was established in 1862.
  • Maryborough Station is on the Melbourne to Mildura line and terminus for V/Line service from Ballarat. It opened in 1874 but the current station building was erected in 1890 with 25 rooms and a clock tower, of red brick with stucco trimming (excerpt from Wikipedia)
  • The Maryborough – Castlemaine passenger service was withdrawn in July 1977, being replaced with a bus service. From that time, the track was then used only for freight until 2004 when the line was closed

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
When completed, this 20km rail trail will connect the large inland NSW city of Wagga Wagga to the rural village of Ladysmith to the southeast. The trail will pass Wagga Wagga airport, running mainly through open country or lightly-wooded farmland. The trail is at the western end of the Riverina Highlands rail trail, with stage 1 between Tumbarumba and Rosewood at the eastern end now open. Wagga Wagga to Ladysmith is stage 2, and its construction may encourage further development of the remaining sections from Ladysmith to Tarcutta (on the Hume Highway) and on to Humula and Rosewood.    

Attractions

  • Wagga Wagga is a major inland city in New South Wales, situated on the Murrumbidgee River, and is the major regional centre for the Riverina
  • Ladysmith is a rural town with an extensive agricultural and railway history
  • The Riverina area offers a large range of tourism experiences
  • In the Wagga Wagga area, the trail will form part of the local bicycle network and will provide an off-road commuting option between the suburb of Forest Hill and the downtown area
  • Ladysmith station has a large display of railway heritage memorabilia

Trail Guide

The trail will commence in central Wagga Wagga, running along the disused ex-government branch line that once connected Wagga Wagga with Tumbarumba.

Access to the trail will be provided near the Wagga Wagga CBD and also at the Equex Centre sports complex, with links to the Kooringal Rd and Riverside cycleways.

The trail will end at the Ladysmith railway station trailhead.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Wiradjuri people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail will be built.

Development and future of the rail trail

The local rail trail group has been working for many years to promote this rail trail. The success of the Tumbarumba-Rosewood rail trail has provided a boost to their efforts. On 26th July 2021, Wagga Wagga Regional Council voted unanimously to support the development of rail trails in the Wagga Wagga region. This positive step will enable detailed planning to begin, with next steps expected in March 2022.

Railway History 

The Tumbarumba branch line from Wagga Wagga opened in 1917, passing through Ladysmith, Tarcutta, Humula, Rosewood and terminated at Tumbarumba.

Passenger services ceased on the line in 1974, and all operations on the line stopped in 1987.  The station at Ladysmith is the only surviving station structure on the rail corridor.

From Ladysmith, the rail corridor extends further east to Tarcutta, crossing the Hume Highway just to the south of the Tarcutta township. Remnants of the railway are visible from the highway.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Wagga Wagga City Council votes to support rail trails

Posted: 31/07/21

Wagga Wagga City Council voted unanimously on 26 July to give in-principle support for the development ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
This proposed 29 km rail trail is located in a farmland area, 35 minutes by car from Yass and about 90 minutes from Canberra. It features cuttings, curves and old timber bridges as it makes its way northeast from Galong toward Boorowa.  Boorowa, in the Hilltops tourism region, has many historic buildings. European settlement dates from the 1820s. Boorowa is known for its annual ‘running of the sheep’ festival. In the local indigenous language, boorowa means bird; the region has abundant bird life.  Galong township also features historic buildings and has the nearby St Clements Retreat, a historic monastery open to the public. The proposed rail trail passes within 500 m of St Clements, with easy access from the rail trail when built, or by road. 

Attractions

  • Boorowa is a picturesque regional town offering a range of tourist attractions
  • The Hilltops region has a lot to offer visitors – see links below
  • St Clements Retreat near Galong is an ex-monastery open to the public
  • The Boorowa Irish WoolFest is an annual event to celebrate ‘everything wool’ – see link below

Trail Guide

The trail will run for 29 km through rolling, partly wooded farmland. There will be a number of access points, including one near the Boorowa River bridge.  

A trailhead is planned for McMahon Street in Galong. At the Boorowa end, the trail will end near the town’s golf course. 

Important note: This rail trail is not yet open. The alignment is owned by Transport NSW and much of it passes through private property. Trespassing on the alignment is prohibited. 

Section Guides

This trail is not yet open.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Ngunawal people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail will be built.

Development and future of the rail trail

Local community advocates for the Boorowa to Galong rail trail are working to bring this trail on a long-abandoned government rail corridor to life for the benefit of local businesses.  

The group is aiming to build on the success of the Tumbarumba to Rosewood rail trail, which has seen a number of new businesses opened in the Tumbarumba region since the rail trail opened in 2020. 

Rail line history 

The Galong to Boorowa railway line opened in October 1914, as a branch of the main Southern NSW railway. The line was used mainly to transport livestock and produce. Passenger services were closed in 1974.

There are now few remnants of the railway infrastructure, though the corridor and rails are visible in many places. Most timber bridges are still in place, and the turntable and water stand are still at the Boorowa end.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Another potential rail trail in New South Wales

Posted: 17/06/21

Following the successful rail trails forum in Tumbarumba in April 2021, another potential rail trail has ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
This potential rail trail is a hidden gem in Sydney’s western suburbs.  It will provide a natural linkage with surrounding green spaces and pathways, including the popular Cooks River pathway between Botany Bay, Strathfield and Homebush.  It will be accessible from Lidcombe station via Bachell Avenue at the southern end, and from Edwin Flack Avenue in the northern end, just across from the Sydney Olympic Park athletics warm-up arena.  The existing link between the Cooks River pathway and Olympic Park is on-road for most of the trip. The proposed Pippita rail trail would provide a quieter off-road path via historic Rookwood Cemetery and Lidcombe T1 train station.   

Attractions

  • Sydney Olympic Park is the sporting hub of greater Sydney, having hosted the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games 
  • The Sydney Olympic Park precinct connects many walking and cycling trails along the Parramatta River
  • Lidcombe offers culinary and cultural experiences 
  • This short trail would connect the transport hub at Lidcombe with the greater western network of off-road trails.

Trail Guide

The trail is relatively short at 3 km, but when completed will provide a natural linkage with surrounding green spaces and pathways. 

It will be accessible from Bachell Avenue at the southern end, and from Edwin Flack Avenue in the northern end, on the edge of Sydney Olympic Park.  

Lidcombe has many shops and restaurants, and Sydney Olympic Park has restaurants, cafes and hotels. It also has a regular suburban train service on the T1 line. 

Sydney Olympic Park has historical sites and good tourist, cycling and walking amenities. The Parramatta River is at the north end of the area. There are off-road cycle paths to Parramatta, Liverpool and Prospect Reservoir, and safe cycling paths from Parramatta through Westmead to the 42 km M7 cycleway.  

Important note: This rail trail is not yet open. The alignment is owned by Transport NSW and most of it passes through private property. Trespassing on the alignment is prohibited. 

Section Guides

This trail is not yet open.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Dharug people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail will be built.

Development and future of the rail trail

The trail will begin at the northern side of Lidcombe station, running off Bachell Ave. It will be to the east of existing warehouses in both Bachell Ave and Birnie St. The alignment ends at Edwin Flack Ave in Olympic Park.  

The rail trail will be easily accessible from either Lidcombe or Olympic Park train stations. 

Rail line history 

The Pippita rail trail will use the former goods railway line alignment that existed before Sydney Olympic Park was constructed. A spur line from Lidcombe to a meatworks at Pippita was closed in 1995. 

There are disused bridges over Parramatta Road and the M4 motorway, just to the west of the current suburban rail line, that will be re-used as part of the rail trail.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Rapid progress on the Pippita Trail (Lidcombe to Sydney Olympic Park)

Posted: 25/09/20

The potential of the Pippita Trail has been identified and rapid initial progress has been ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • The proposed Greenethorpe to Grenfell Rail Trail would be 30 km long, making it ideal for day trippers and locals
  • The countryside in this area offers spectacular rural scenery
  • Grenfell has lots of other attractions including grain silo art and the annual Henry Lawson festival

Attractions

  • Iandra Castle and Weddin Mountains National Park nearby
  • Grenfell Railway Station is well preserved, and is the precinct for the local men’s shed.
  • Grain silo artwork at Grenfell

Trail Guide

This trail would traverse rich farming land in the Greenethorpe area, before coming to more undulating countryside toward Grenfell.

There will be a few road crossings, most on  quiet rural roads.

Greenethorpe has a small post office and coffee shop as well as a country pub, both offering meals and refreshments.

Grenfell is a large country town with many accommodation and refreshment options.

Section Guides

Greenethorpe to Grenfell (30 km)

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Wiradjuri people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail will be built.

Development and future of the rail trail

In 2021 a local committee was formed to lobby the NSW Government for a rail trail on the disused line between Greenethorpe and Grenfell.

In May a motion was put to Weddin Shire Council to investigate sources of funding to carry out a detailed feasibility study for construction of a rail trail.

Rail line history 

The proposed Greenethorpe to Grenfell Rail Trail is part of the Grenfell branch line, a 52 km branch line in the Central West of NSW that branches off the Blayney-Demondrille line at Koorawatha, and passes through undulating countryside to Grenfell.

The branch line was built as a result of local lobbying once the main line had opened. The line opened for traffic in 1901 and was built to ‘pioneer’ standards – light rail, earth ballast and no fencing.

Although built primarily to carry grain, the line did see reasonable passenger numbers; in fact, in 1936 the railcar was replaced by a scheduled steam train, but declining numbers saw the last passenger service in August 1974.

Services were suspended over the whole line in 1991, but the section between Koorawatha Junction and Greenethorpe was reopened the following year to carry grain.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Greenethorpe to Grenfell NSW, Rail Trail News

Posted: 05/05/21

A small group of residents in the Greenethorpe district are calling on surrounding communities to ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Running 154 km from Moree to Inverell, it has the potential to be one of the longest rail trails in NSW
  • Scenic, undulating landscapes close to Inverell
  • The original branch line was built for steam trains and follows a circuitous course through the hills – ideal  for a rail trail

Attractions

  • Moree Artesian Aquatic Centre
  • Historic buildings and museums
  • Kaputar National Park nearby
  • National Transport Museum at Inverell
  • Inverell Pioneer Village
  • Sapphire fossicking
  • Fishing at nearby Copeton Dam

Trail Guide

NOTE: This rail trail is not yet open. It is one of 17 potential Rail Trails in NSW

The Inverell railway line is a closed railway line in New South Wales, Australia. The line branches from Moree, and travels east through farming countryside and the small towns of Gravesend and Warialda Rail, gradually rising through Delungra toward the terminus at Inverell. Several silos, stock loading facilities and associated sidings can still be seen along the old alignment.

Section Guides

 

Moree to Bininguy (40 km)

Bininguy to Gravesend (16 km)

Gravesend to Warialda Rail (23 km)

Warialda Rail to Delungra (36 km)

Delungra to Inverell (40 km)

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Kamilaroi people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail will be built.

Development and future of the rail trail

As of June 2021 there is no active committee trying to lobby for the construction of a rail trail on this disused corridor.  Rail Trails Australia views this as a viable potential rail trail, and would be keen to support any person or group to lobby for its construction.

If you are interested, contact us at nsw@railtrails.org.au

Rail Line History

Construction of the 154km line from Moree began in July 1898, and around 300 people were employed using horses and drays and a huge plough. A gang of 40 men cleared timber, and earthworks were made by horse-drawn scoops.

Travelling time for passengers between Sydney and Inverell by rail in 1904 was more than 24 hours.

Passenger services between Inverell and Moree ended in 1983. The final train from Inverell yard ran in June 1987, and the line beyond Delungra was decommissioned on 2 December 1987. In August 1991, the line was further truncated to Biniguy, with the final section closed on 14 June 1994, and the line listed as out of use beyond a short siding from the junction with the Mungindi line, just south of Moree station. The bridge across the Gwydir River near Gravesend was heritage listed in 1999.

Following the closure of the line in 1987, the Inverell station building was relocated to Inverell Pioneer Village.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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