Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
This short, attractive pathway is a popular off-road cycle route. Views are mainly bush with some rural residential housing. Signage reveals items and locations of historical significance, particularly relating to the mining history of the area, including tragedies such as the deaths of 96 miners and rescuers in a coal mine explosion in 1902. There is also information on cutting of red cedar timber. The pathway ends at the site of the former Nebo Colliery’s Bradford breaker building. 
  • The top section of the pathway is suitable for walkers and mountain bikes only.

Attractions

  • The historic Mount Kembla Village Hotel
  • Soldiers and Miners Memorial Church
  • Relics from the American Creek kerosene works
  • Lookouts, walking tracks and tourist drives of the Illawarra escarpment
  • Many beaches and Lake Illawarra
  • Good cycling options, including railside trails, to Wollongong or Pt Kembla
  • City of Wollongong

Trail Guide

The trail can be accessed from: 

  • A small carpark southeast of 200 Cordeaux Rd
  • Carpark and monument on Stones Rd
  • Kirkwood Place

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Dharawal people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail

The Pathway was completed in stages, with the final Stage 3 to the Bradford breaker site completed in October 2016.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
The Manjimup to Deanmill Heritage Trail is a short rail trail near Manjimup in WA’s Southwest. The trail gives visitors an insight into the district’s forestry, farming and railway history. Manjimup is known for its undulating land, tall timbers, abundant fresh water and rich soils.

Attractions

  • Tall forest, scenic open farmland
  • The small timber town of Deanmill, which includes a number of historic mill cottages, the Deanmill Workers Club and the Deanmill Football Oval
  • Other attractions in around Manjimup including Fontys Pool, Diamond Tree Lookout and One Tree Bridge

Trail Guide

The Manjimup to Deanmill Heritage Trail is on the alignment of a historic timber tramway that connected the Deanmill sawmill to the main line at Manjimup. Starting in Manjimup near the intersection of Rose St and Lock St, the trail heads west parallel to Ipsen St.

The trail passes through enclosed natural bushland before transitioning to open areas with views over farmland. The first kilometre is asphalt and the remainder is compacted gravel.

At its eastern end, this trail provides a connection to the Manjimup Linear Path. Forming a ‘T’, the two rail trails intersect in the centre of Manjimup just south of Ipsen Street. The Manjimup to Deanmill Heritage Trail also forms part of the 1000 km Munda Biddi MTB trail linking Perth to Albany.

Background Information

Traditional owners

Rail Trails Australia acknowledge the Murrum people of the Noongar Nation, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which this rail trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

The Manjimup to Deanmill Heritage Trail was established in the 1990s and upgraded in 2017.

Rail line history 

The Deanmill tramway was built in 1912 to connect the sawmill (which supplied timber sleepers for the Transcontinental Railway) to the main line in Manjimup. The Deanmill settlement was named after the mill’s first manager, Alfred Dean. Following the closure of the tramway in 1966, the reserve has regrown and forms an important green corridor on the western side of Manjimup.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • The trail is a pleasant path along the old rail reserve. It has easy grades and is ideal for children and novice riders. 
  • Centenary Gardens features an old rail weighbridge complete with gangers’ trolley, railway signal, BBQ and picnic facilities, playground and toilets.

Attractions

  •   Old station building
  •   Silo art
  •   Rural town scenery
  •   Lavender Federation Walking Trail access
  •   Murray to Clare Lavender Cycling Trail (M2C) access

Trail Guide

The Eudunda Rail Trail features a smooth fine gravel surface of good width. It is South Australia’s shortest rail trail but is a handy off-road link for cyclists, walkers and runners. Two of SA’s long distance trails, the Lavender Federation Walking Trail and the M2C Lavender Cycling Trail, pass along this trail. 

There are coffee shops, bakery and supermarket in the nearby main street, and toilets and picnic facilities at Centenary Gardens.

Section Guides

Worlds End Hwy to Thiele Hwy (0.6km)

The trail starts opposite the Centenary Gardens on Worlds End Hwy and runs through the station yard alongside the old platform. The stone station building is intact but in poor condition. East of the station the trail passes between a large iron elevated tank and a water standpipe. Grain silos opposite the station have been decorated with ‘silo-art’.

Head east across South Tce and continue behind houses until the trail leaves the railway embankment and terminates at a pedestrian crossing on Thiele Hwy.

 

Side Trails

Centenary Gardens

Opposite the trail start point on Worlds End Hwy, a paved footpath leads into Centenary Gardens past a rail weighbridge with a gangers’ trolley on display. Adjacent is a children’s playground and free BBQ facilities with public toilets beyond that. A bronze statue pays tribute to author Colin Thiele who grew up in this area.

 

Lavender Federation Walking Trail

The Lavender Trail extends south to Murray Bridge and northwest to Clare and is well signposted.

 

M2C Lavender Cycling Trail

The M2C Lavender Cycling Trail extends south to Murray Bridge and northwest to Clare using mostly unsealed roads and tracks. It is not signposted but maps and directions can be downloaded.

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Ngadjuri people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Development and Future of the Rail Trail 

The trail takes advantage of the old railway reserve to provide an off-road link between the centre of town and the showgrounds/oval area to the east.

There have been proposals to extend the rail trail north to Hampden but there are currently no extensions planned.

Rail Line History 

The first section of the line from Gawler to Kapunda was opened in 1860. It was extended via Eudunda to Morgan in 1878 to provide a more efficient freight and passenger connection between the Murray paddle steamers and both the city of Adelaide and Port Adelaide for ocean transport. 

The Eudunda to Morgan section closed in 1969 and the line removed not long after. The Kapunda to Eudunda section was closed in 1994 and was pulled up the following year.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Honours elite junior local cyclist Shamus Liptrot who died in 2011, several years after suffering serious injuries in a cycling accident. Halbury was Shamus’s home town 
  • An excellent ride for all the family and can be extended to form a longer ride along the Wakefield Plains and Clare Valley
  • The history of the bullock and rail trails comes alive in Devil’s Garden adjoining the trail midway between Balaklava and Halbury
  • An excellent ride from Leasingham through the range to Halbury then Balaklava

Attractions

  • Dunn’s Bridge 1.5 km from Balaklava is  a single span bowstring arch bridge built in 1880 over the Wakefield River.
  • Devil’s Garden 7km from Balaklava, east of the Roberts Rd crossing is a small area of eucalypts that has a history of sand hills, bullock teams, corduroy roads and serious flooding. To find out more click here
  • Links to the Balaklava to Port Wakefield section of the Copper Rail Trail
  • Links to a back roads trail to the Riesling Trail (Leasingham) in the east

Trail Guide

The trail is flat and runs through a well vegetated corridor. At Roberts Rd about halfway, take time to visit Devil’s Garden.

Parking is available in Edith Tce, Balaklava, close to shops and amenities and a short distance from the trail at the junction of War Memorial Dr and Railway Tce. The trail begins on the northern side of the rail corridor just north of the intersection of War Memorial Dr and Railway Tce. Follow the path east along the back of Christopher St.

 

 

Section Guides

Balaklava to Halbury

The trail crosses Dunn’s Bridge 1.5 km from Balaklava. This metal bowstring arch bridge was built in 1880 and heritage listed in 1995.

A further 3 km along the trail there is a small bridge over a creek. Dismount to cross the bridge; it is narrow with an uneven surface.

Use Roberts Rd 2 km along the trail to reach a roadside cairn that describes the Devil’s Garden, a fine example of mallee box woodland.

The rail trail terminates at Halbury, but a well signed back roads trail can be followed over the range to Leasingham and the Riesling Trail

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Kaurna and Ngadjuri people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the trail is built.

Rail history

The line from Balaklava to Blyth opened in 1876 and closed in 1988. The rails and sleepers were removed shortly after, and the rail trail was built in 2012.

There is a memorial to Shamus Liptrot at the junction of the trail and Bridge Rd, 1 km from Balaklava.

The 37 km Copper Trail begins at Port Wakefield follows an unused rail reserve 26 km to Balaklava and a further 11 km to Halbury. From Halbury the Copper Trail follows a signed route on back roads over the range to Leasingham on the Riesling Trail. 

Development and future of the Rail Trail

Wakefield Regional Council is planning to extend the trail beyond Halbury, following the unused rail corridor north. Ultimately, the Copper Rail Trail may connect with the Southern Flinders Rail Trail.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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New Copper Rail Trail Opened in South Australia

Posted: 18/07/20

The Wakefield Regional Council, located in the mid north of South Australia, has constructed a 26...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
A spectacular walk following the route of a former standard gauge private railway that served kerosene shale mines and refinery.  The railway ran through two tunnels, the second of which (closer to Newnes) now has a large population of glow worms. The total distance from Newnes Junction and Newnes is 50km. Between Newnes Junction and the first tunnel the former railway is mostly a gravel road. Shortly after the first tunnel, the road ends at a carpark and from here it is walking only through the glow worm tunnel down to the valley floor. There are two options to travel to the Glow Worm Tunnel Car Park and rail trail from the south – from Lithgow or from Clarence Station site. Both options are around 35 km and are close to an hour’s drive on mostly gravel roads. Warning: You will likely encounter many 4WD and trail bikes on these gravel roads. In July 2020 these roads were in average condition and best traveled in a 4WD or car with reasonable clearance.

Attractions

  • Lithgow Zig Zag
  • Glow Worm Tunnel
  • Spectacular views of Wolgan Valley

Trail Guide

Access points

  • Clarence Railway Station
  • Newnes
  • Glow Worm Car Park

Clarence Station to Glow Worm Tunnel Rd (9 km)

From the Clarence Station site on Chifley Rd, Clarence, the unsealed Old Bells Line of Road travels to the right (northeast) around the station buildings.

Clarence Station is also the Zig-Zag Railway’s top station. Several buildings and some rolling stock can be viewed at the site, but the Zig-Zag Railway is still closed following two major bushfires. It is around 9 km from Clarence Station to the junction with State Mine Gully Rd/ Glow Worm Tunnel Road. Turn right at the junction to go to the Glow Worm Tunnel; the left turn goes to Lithgow as per the description below.

Lithgow to Glow Worm Tunnel Rd (6 km)

If riding or driving from Lithgow railway station, head out from the north side of the station, turn right and travel through Lithgow’s suburbs on Atkinson St and State Mine Gully Rd to the interesting State Mine Heritage Park and Railway. Continue north on State Mine Gully Rd. The road will become gravel and after a short but very steep climb intersects Old Bells Line of Road and becomes Glow Worm Tunnel Rd. As at July 2020 this steep section of road was in poor condition and best accessed by 4WD, especially heading north to the tunnels in wet weather.

Glow Worm Tunnel Rd to Glow Worm Tunnel Car Park (27 km)

The intersection of State Mine Rd and Old Bells Line of Road is on a plateau at the top of the hill. From there it is 27 km and 40 minutes on gravel road to the Glow Worm Tunnel Car Park. Continue north on the main gravel road through State forest for about 8 km to a crossroads and Bungleboori Picnic Area. Continue straight through the crossroads; the main gravel road continues north-northeast.

At around 15 km past the crossroads and Bungleboori Picnic Area is Deane’s Siding, where there are some rusty pieces of old railway engines. Much of Glow Worm Tunnel Rd is on or close to the old railway alignment, but it is here where the rail trail proper begins. The road is still a gravel road but it is now obvious that it is running along the former railway.  Deane’s Siding also marks the beginning of a long downhill section – bliss on a bike!

After around 8km you will reach Newnes No 1 Tunnel: beware of motor vehicles. Just past the tunnel the trail curves around and descends dramatically; the scenery here is spectacular. Continue downward to a car park for the Glow Worm Tunnel.

Glow Worm Tunnel Car Park to (and through) Glow Worm Tunnel (1.3 km)

From here all car access is banned and the National Parks and Wildlife Service does not allow bicycles. The trail is narrow and climbs around bridge washouts in places. This short section is the most popular part of the trail and there are dozens of people here on weekends.

The Glow Worm Tunnel is just over a kilometre from the carpark. Not surprisingly, it is very dark and a torch is needed as the tunnel floor is very eroded and uneven and has water flowing through it. DO NOT shine torches at the glow worms or touch them! When you are in the middle of the tunnel, turn off your torch and take in the great show from the glow worms.

At the other end of the tunnel is a moist, Jurassic Park world of ferns, palm trees and deep gullies. Remains of a railway bridge over a stream are visible. Continue through the deep cutting (much of the way is thick with vegetation and water) for about 250 m to the other side of the escarpment and magnificent views of Wolgan Valley. Most people return to the carpark via the same route from here, or from the end of the Tunnel, a round trip around 3km.

Glow Worm Tunnel to Newnes (11 km)

The rail trail continues along the edge of the escarpment; to your right is sheer rock face; to your left, continuing views of the valley. The odd sleeper is still visible but much of the railway heritage is gone. This is probably the best section to cycle; however, a number of bridges have been washed out (a problem experienced by the rail line during operation), necessitating some steep climbs around washouts. Bushfires in 2019 and 2020 burnt out many of the steps in the washouts and recent storms have caused tree falls and rock slides, so this section is likely to be slow and best on foot rather than ridden.

Eventually the rail trail comes to a crossroads with tracks to the left and right. Continue straight ahead to follow the Rail Trail to Newnes. The steep (downward) track to the left ends at Wolgan River (crossing is easy via a weir) and then reaches the main (good-quality dirt) road to Newnes. Turn right on this main road to go to Newnes (an easy 5 km on flat terrain), turn left to return (at one stage via a very steep hill) to Lithgow (about 40 km, partly dirt but bitumen from the start of the steep hill onward). The track to the right is the Old Coach Road, which returns to the trail between the Glow Worm Tunnel and the carpark and makes for a 7.5 km, four-hour loop walk.

Newnes

There is a large camping area surrounded by spectacular rock walls and some cabins at Newnes but the area does get very busy, especially in holiday periods and on long weekends. A sandy creek crossing on the road just before the campground may not be passable for 2WD vehicles. Emirates ‘One & Only Wolgan Valley’ is on the road back toward Lithgow; otherwise there are many hotels in Lithgow or in the western Blue Mountains towns and surrounds.

A small store at Newnes has basic snacks for sale. The owner is in residence and is there some of the time, but food and other supplies may not always be available.

It is worth continuing a short distance past Newnes town site to the ruins of the shale oil mining operation. The trail ends at the base of these ruins: interpretive signs have been set up to give visitors an appreciation of what was once an enormous enterprise in a very remote location.

Return via the same rail trail track (more difficult, as it is almost all uphill) or via the good-quality dirt then bitumen road 40 km to Lithgow.

The former railway is now part of Wollemi National Park managed by the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service.  Refer to the NWPS at the link below for more information

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Dharug and Wiradjuri people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Railway history

Following the discovery of kerosene shale at Newnes, attention turned to how the processed products could be economically transported to markets. As the Wolgan Valley is hemmed in by sandstone cliffs, this was not easy.

Engineer Henry Deane not only did it, but surprised skeptics by using standard gauge, making wagons compatible with the main line to Sydney.

The line was opened in Dec 1907, and was used for only 24 years before it closed in 1932. The railway branched off the main western line at Newnes Junction, between Bell Station and the disused Clarence Station, ascended to 1200 m before dropping down to Newnes (altitude 530 m) in the rugged Wolgan River Valley, all in 50 km.

The railway route descends through Penrose (now Tunnel) Gorge, passing through two tunnels and sharing a 6 m wide chasm with the creek, before emerging into the Wolgan Valley.

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