Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • A rail trial steeped in Colonial and Maritime history
  • The trail connects with the Coast Park, a 28km shared use trail along a continuous sandy beach coast line
  • The trail links with several side trails that explore the Port Dock precinct and the coastal beach area of Semaphore
  • A flat 23.5km ride on quiet roads and paths, adjacent to an existing railway line
  • Suitable for all the family

Attractions

  • Three quality Museums in one street – National Railway Museum, SA Aviation Museum and SA Maritime Museum
  • Port Dock historic precinct
  • Access to the Coast Park and beach facilities
  • Anna Rennie (Inner Harbour) Loop Trail

Trail Guide

The trail is divided into three sections commencing from the Adelaide Parklands and following the existing rail corridor to the Port Dock precinct and then on to the Outer Harbour.  The Outer Harbour Railway Line was constructed in 1856 to transport passengers and freight between Adelaide and the Outer Harbour / Port Dock sea ports.

Section Guides

Adelaide Parklands to Woodville Railway Station (8 km)

The trail commences on the cycle track near the Morphett Street Bridge and follows the River Torrens and the rail line westward past the Torrens Weir and then under the railway line into Bonython Park. Follow the river to the first bridge and cross it and continue to the edge of the Park Lands where the path turns right and crosses the railway line again and follows the line under the roadway. From this point onward the trail is clearly marked and progresses through the new Bowden / Brompton housing development and utilises bridges to cross main roads.

The trail follows the quiet suburban streets adjacent to the railway line through to the Woodville Railway Station. If you need a rest, stop at the MJ McInerney Reserve.

 

Woodville Railway Station to Port Dock Precinct (6 km)

At the Woodville Railway Station continue straight on. There is a path on the opposite side of the railway line that follows the branch line toward the suburb of Grange. This path is still in development but will soon form a rail side trail.

The trail continues on either quiet streets or shared use paths however there are several points where the trail crosses main roads. Fortunately, the crossing points are controlled by traffic lights.

The path passes under Grand Junction Road, winds through suburban streets until it enters the old Port Dock rail yards. At this point you will see the Aviation Museum, then, in Lipson Street, you will pass the Railway Museum and once you cross St Vincent Street you will see the Maritime Museum on the right. All the Museums are excellent for children and can take some time to visit.

Please note that Lipson Street is one way so the return trip uses Timpson Street – please check the Rail Trails Map.

You are now in the Port Dock Precinct and you will come to the Port River at the end of Lipson Street. You may notice some interesting paving along the wharf area which indicates where some of the old railway lines were located. This area had numerous train, tram and trolly bus tracks, along wharfs, down streets and over bridges. There is an interesting shared use 3.5km trail (the Anna Rennie Loop Trail) that circles the Port Dock area. Further details are available in the Side Trails section below.

 

Port Dock Precinct to Outer Harbour (9.5 km)

The trail uses the Birkenhead Bridge to cross the Port River and then crosses Semaphore Road and follows the existing rail line along Mead Street and then weaves its way through suburbia until finally crossing the rail line into Lady Ruthven Drive. The trail crosses Lady Ruthven Drive and then continues on a short distance to a large roundabout. Follow the shared use path to the left until you get to Lady Ruthven Reserve and the Outer Harbour Lookout. This is the end of the rail trail however there is a great option for the return trip by following the Coast Park shared use trail south along the coast to Semaphore and then returning to Port Dock via the Semaphore Rail Trail.

 

Side Routes

Anna Rennie Loop Path – previously known as the Inner Harbour Loop rail trail (3.5km loop)

Please note that the Anna Rennie Loop Trail overlaps the Outer Harbour Rail Trail where it crosses the Port River (Birkenhead Bridge) and follows Jenkins Street and a small section of Semaphore Road.

The Loop trail circles the Port Dock precinct, also known as the New Port which replaced the Old Port dock which was further upstream in the Port River and was basically a mosquito infested, smelly swamp. It was so despised by the colonists that it was called Port Misery. The New Port on the other hand was well constructed on reclaimed land with modern timber wharfs and bridges. The loop circles the Port River and provides cyclists and walkers with convenient and safe path. The trail has many interactive maps that allow the viewer to superimpose historical photographs from a century ago over todays view of the Port. Also of interest, is Hart’s Mill Playground, a convenient place to rest while the kids burn-off some energy. Further details and maps can be found in the Information and Links section below

 

Coast Park Trail

A 28km trail which follows the coast from Outer Harbour to Seacliff, south of Adelaide. Please note that a 5km section of the trail currently follows Military Road from Third Avenue Semaphore Park to the Grange Jetty. This 5km section is expected to be converted into a shared use path along the coast over the next few years. The Coast Park also connects with the Mike Turtur Rail Trail and the River Torrens Linear Park. Further information is available from the TrailsSA – see the link below.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Kaurna people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

 

Development and future of the rail trail

The Rosewater Loop is a potential Rail trail of 5km in length that would connect the Outer Harbour Rail Trail with the Port River Bikeway via Eastern Parade. The loop was constructed in 1915 to alleviate congestion in the Port Dock rail yards and is no longer in use.

 

Rail line history

The Railway between Adelaide and the Port Dock Railway Station was opened in 1856 and was the second railway in South Australia and is believed to be the first Government owned railway in the British Empire. The rail line was later extended to Outer Harbour when a deeper sea port was required.

The Port Dock area was incredibly busy, bringing immigrants and produce in from abroad and exporting copper and farm produce to the world. All of this movement needed an efficient transport system. Port Road which runs parallel to the existing rail way line has an extraordinary width of more that 60m and is relatively flat and it was proposed by Colonel William Light in 1836 that a canal should be constructed between Adelaide and the Port Dock precinct. The proposal was romantic but did not measure up against the cost effective and efficient new rail technology that was emerging.

The Port Dock area became a maze of small rail lines, mostly privately owned and connected to the Wharf area and smelters. There were horse drawn trams, trains and trolly buses, steam trains and electric trams. Confusion reigned as no one knew who had right of way and no one cared because the private transport operators had to make money to survive. Eventually the port activity declined, the small private transport operators closed down and the State Government railway and bus services were all that remained.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
The Perth–Fremantle Principal Shared Path (PSP) is a high-quality urban dual use pathway that runs parallel to the Fremantle railway line through Perth’s western suburbs. At 20 km long, the path can be cycled in an hour or walked in approximately four hours.

Attractions

  • Various historical and cultural attractions in and around Perth CBD
  • Café and retail precincts in Subiaco, Claremont, Swanbourne, Cottesloe and North Fremantle
  • Spectacular views over the Indian Ocean
  • The historic harbour city of Fremantle

Section Guides

Yagan Square to Subiaco (3.7 km)

Starting at the Yagan Square digital tower, the path heads west along Wellington St to Perth Arena. Yagan Square and Perth Arena were developed as part of the Perth City Link project, which involved sinking a short section of the Fremantle line, reconnecting the Perth CBD with Northbridge.

After rejoining the railway on the northern side of Perth Arena, the PSP continues west past City West and West Leederville Stations. Approaching Subiaco, the remains of Subiaco Oval (home of Australian Rules Football in WA between 1908 and 2017) can be seen on the left. After crossing beneath Haydn Bunton Drive, the railway enters another tunnel. The PSP continues at surface level through the Market Square parklands before arriving at Subiaco Station at the northern end of Rokeby Rd.

 Subiaco to Claremont (5.8 km)

Leaving Subiaco, the PSP continues on the northern side of Roberts Rd through the Subi Centro redevelopment area. The PSP passes beneath Hay St via an underpass, where it rejoins the railway at Jolimont Park. Heading southwest, the PSP continues along the western side of the railway past Daglish, Shenton Park, Karrakatta and Loch Street Stations. Key points of interest along this section include the Irwin Army Barracks and Karrakatta Cemetery.

The path runs along the southern edge of Claremont Showgrounds, home of the WA Royal Agricultural Society and Perth Royal Show before arriving at Claremont Station – one of the oldest and most historic stations on the Perth rail network. Claremont itself is a major retail area home to many restaurants, cafes, and speciality stores.

Claremont to North Fremantle (7.0 km)

Heading south, the PSP continues on the western side of the railway. Smaller retail precincts can be found along Claremont Crescent (near Swanbourne Station) and Napoleon St (near Cottesloe Station). There is a connecting path to Cottesloe Beach along Forrest St.  Cottesloe Beach is one of the most famous beaches in Perth, and is home to the annual Sculptures by the Sea art exhibition. The section between Mosman Park and North Fremantle stations offers spectacular views over the Indian Ocean.

North Fremantle to Fremantle (2.9 km)

Between North Fremantle Station and the Swan River, the best route is via Pearse St. Users are advised to take care when crossing Tydeman Rd, a busy freight route. On the southern side of Tydeman Rd the path continues behind the Swan Hotel and on to the historic Fremantle Traffic Bridge. The final section between the Swan River and central Fremantle can be undertaken using Beach St (where there is a footpath and on-road bike lanes) or via the shared path on Peter Hughes Dr. Beach St runs past the historic Fremantle Woolstores, whereas Peter Hughes Dr runs past the Fremantle Passenger Terminal and E-Shed Markets.

Background Information

Traditional owners

Rail Trails Australia acknowledges the Whadjuk people of the Noongar Nation, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which this pathway is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

Over the next few years, the PSP will be extended from North Fremantle Station to the Swan River as part of the Swan River Crossings project, which includes replacement of the existing Fremantle Traffic Bridge and duplication of the rail bridge.

Rail line history 

The Fremantle railway line connects Perth with Fremantle. The line opened on 1 March 1881 as the “Eastern Railway” and ran between Fremantle and Guildford via central Perth. In July 1926, the Fremantle Railway Bridge over the Swan River was partly washed away in a flood, with one line restored in 1926 and the second in 1928.

Passenger services on the Fremantle line were suspended in September 1979. The WA Government planned to convert the railway reserve into a busway. The closure of the line was opposed by Friends of the Railway, which submitted a petition of 100,000 signatures and prepared a 98-page report arguing for its retention. The service was reinstated in July 1983 following a change of government. The railway was electrified in 1991. Over the years, two sections of the railway have been ‘sunk’. The Subiaco tunnel opened in 1998 and the Perth City Link tunnel opened in 2014.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Historic WWII munitions plant with extensive rail and tramway network
  • Links Salisbury Railway Station with the northern industrial and Defence precincts  
  • Passes alongside RAAF Edinburgh 
  • Semi-rural alternative to busier urban routes between Salisbury and Elizabeth

Attractions

  • Historic remains of Penfield railway
  • RAAF Base Edinburgh
  • Penfield Model Engineers Society railway park

Trail Guide

This flat trail links Salisbury Railway Station with the northern industrial and Defence precincts via the railway corridor where possible and by adjacent paths and roads where the railway corridor is not accessible.

The trail gives cyclists and tourists an opportunity to view the remains of a once busy and important railway line. Some of the railway corridor is still within Defence land and is not accessible. 

Penfield Model Engineers Society has extensive landscaped grounds and railway networks and is at the eastern end of Woomera Ave (1.5 km from Penfield Trail). 

From the northern end cyclists can head east to return to the Gawler railway line at Elizabeth or head northwest to the Stuart O’Grady Cycleway to Gawler.

There are no facilities, shops or cafes along this trail.

There is no signage relating to this trail; it must be self-navigated.

Section Guides

Salisbury to Penfield 1 (3.2 km)

This section features a smooth hot-mix surface with some paved sections.

From Salisbury Railway Station, find the cycle path along the western side of the station. Head north, cross Salisbury Highway on the pedestrian bridge and continue north. At the Little Para River, cross the Little Para River Cycle Trail and continue north across the pedestrian bridge. At the next fork, veer right to pass between Salisbury High School and the railway line on a paved path that terminates on Langford Tce.

Continue northwest along Langford Tce with the Main North Line on the right. Right turns are not allowed at the northern end of Langford Tce, so cyclists must use the ramp on the right and proceed on the footpath along Bagster Rd, crossing the Main North Line before then crossing Bagster Rd to reach closed-to-traffic First Ave.

The Penfield Line corridor lies between First Ave and the Main North Line. At the northwestern end of First Ave, take the cyclepath to the left to follow close to the Main North Line, crossing the Penfield line corridor in the process.

The cyclepath ends at West Ave. Penfield 1 station was just to the northeast of this point but no remains are visible. The security checkpoint at the entrance to the old Weapons Research Establishment lies to the east. Some buildings are still in use but access to this area is no longer restricted.

  • Behind Salisbury High School near Langford Tce, a subway passes beneath the Main North Line leading to a pedestrian overpass over the Gawler line. From this overpass, the remains of the Penfield line are visible diverging from the Gawler line and ending abruptly at the edge of an industrial estate. This piece of line is sometimes used to park railcars that have terminated at Salisbury
  • As you pass Compton St on Langford Tce you are near the old Hilra Station on the opposite side of the Main North Line, in what is now an industrial estate. No evidence remains
  • On the northern side of Bagster Rd there is some old railway infrastructure and ballast within the railway corridor of the old Penfield line between the Main North Line and First Ave
  • Midway along the cyclepath at the north-western end of First Ave remains of the Penfield Line are visible on the right. The two tracks of the Penfield Line curve to the right while a single line continues straight ahead to the old Bulk Stores, of which some sawtooth roof buildings still exist. Ballast and a number of concrete culverts remain near the line junction.

Penfield 1 to Penfield 3 (2.9 km)

This section is initially on road or footpath, then a good quality sealed cycle path to the west of the Penfield line corridor.

Proceed north along West Ave, which is usually quiet in this section. The eastern footpath is a good option for children or adults who do not wish to ride on the road. Take care at the junction with Woomera Ave.

Prior to the Purling Road roundabout cross to the eastern footpath to minimise road crossings. North of Purling Rd the trail is a good quality path well away from the road. 

Approaching Taranaki Rd roundabout, Penfield 3 station remains are visible on the right.

  • At the eastern end of Woomera Ave (1.5 km from West Ave) is the Penfield Model Engineers Society, with extensive landscaped grounds and railway networks
  • The first road crossing north of the Purling Rd roundabout is the Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO) main entrance, which can be busy at peak hours
  • The Penfield line crossed just to the west of the DSTO security gate and Penfield 2 station was just south of the entrance road. No evidence remains of the line or station
  • North of the DSTO entrance the Penfield railway corridor can be discerned from remaining ballast, culverts and tree lines
  • Close to the fence line of RAAF Edinburgh are several sawtooth roofed red brick warehouses that have loading platforms evident on their eastern sides. They were served by a spurline that crossed West Ave north of Taranaki Rd
  • Platform and shelter remain of Penfield 3 station near Taranaki Rd, now overgrown with trees and bushes 

Penfield 3 to Edinburgh North (1.2 km)

This section is on a good quality sealed cycle path to the west of the Penfield line balloon loop. An alternate route is to travel via Taranaki Rd past Penfield 3 station and turn left into East Ave, which for much of its length is closed to traffic but open to cyclists and pedestrians.

Both routes terminate at Bellchambers Rd, Edinburgh North.

Turn right on to Bellchambers Rd to travel to Elizabeth and the Gawler rail line.

  • the route of the balloon loop can be discerned at various times of the year, depending on crops and grazing
  • RAAF Edinburgh has an AP3C Orion aircraft and a Leopard tank on display near the main entrance

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Kaurna people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Rail line history 

Penfield railway line started just north of the Salisbury station on the Gawler line,  then ran northwest and then turned north through Defence land in what is now Edinburgh. It served  Hilra, Penfield 1, Penfield 2, and Penfield 3 stations and was double track for the whole length. The line had a balloon loop for trains to go the other way. The line was closed and dismantled in 1991.

The line opened in 1941 to serve various World War II armaments factories at what was then known as Penfield. As it was built for industrial purposes, sidings branched off both the Up and Down tracks at many locations. The largest siding went into what is now RAAF Base Edinburgh. During the war years this branch line was used by passenger trains carrying workers to the munitions factories in the area as well as freight trains carrying raw materials in and armaments out. Passenger trains were necessary because Salisbury was a semi-rural community at the time and most of the workforce had to be brought in from other districts.

The No 2 Explosives and Filling factory sprawled over 11.65 square kilometres of plain in the Penfield area in mid 1942. It employed 6500 people working a six-day week around the clock in three shifts. It was served by 25 passenger trains a day; 19 were from Adelaide, the other six from Gawler, Hamley Bridge, Tanunda, Angaston and Kapunda via a specially built connecting curve from the main north line to the Penfield branch line.

A more limited peak hour passenger service to Penfield continued after the war, serving staff at the government Weapons Research Establishment (later DSTO).

The balloon loop closed in June 1983 following the derailment of a train of railcars. Services continued to Penfield 3 on the Down track and returned on the Up track using a crossover just south of Penfield 3. The Up track beyond Hilra closed in April 1984 along with most of the sidings. The remaining sidings were closed in 1986, and single track went for the length of the branch by the end of the 1980s.

The remaining peak-hour trains were withdrawn from the Penfield branch in January 1991, due to low patronage and the need to fund an upgrade of the worn-out track. The track was dismantled in the same year but several hundred metres of track from Salisbury station were kept so that trains from Adelaide terminating at Salisbury could change direction back to Adelaide. The short spur remains, but the next section through Hilra station has been replaced by the road through an industrial estate. 

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • The EDRT is a challenging ~15km walk or cycle beside the Puffing Billy steam railway in the Dandenong Ranges.
  • The trail extends from Clematis through Emerald and Cockatoo to Gembrook.
  • The terrain varies from undulating to hilly on different surfaces (sealed, gravel, dirt) so it is most suitable for hybrid and MTB bikes.
  • The scenery is spectacular, changing regularly along the trail with outstanding forests & lake, farmland and villages.

Attractions

  • The lovely country villages of Emerald, Cockatoo and Gembrook have full facilities available.
  • Emerald Lake, Wright Forest and mountain farms are highlights along the way

Trail Guide

  • This trail follows the Puffing Billy steam railway through the Dandenong Ranges from Clematis/Emerald to Gembrook
  • Whilst only 15km long, this trail offers a full range of experiences for users – hills, forests, farms, rural villages, picnic facilities, heritage railway.
  • It does not follow the follow the railway in some locations and has steeper gradients.

Section Guides

Access Points
* Car Park of Paradise Hotel in Clematis
* Ample on-street parking in Emerald, Cockatoo and Gembrook
* Car Park at Emerald Lake Park (fees applicable)
* Many other parking & access points along the trail

Clematis to Emerald (3km):
* Unofficial start of the trail is at the Paradise Hotel in Clematis
* Trail originates eastern end of the car park
* Pass along a short section of trail before crossing both the railway and Edenmont Road
* Trail follows on the north side of the railway up Emerald Bank (if you’re lucky, you’ll see Puffing Billy working very hard up this climb) and across Pinnocks Road & the railway.
* Trail is interrupted at Belgrave-Gembrook Road – travellers can cross the road to enter Emerald Station Park (south side of railway) or use the road, turn right at the roundabout (Kilvington Drive) to enter the main street of Emerald.
* Note the many shops & eateries including the famous Emerald Village Bakery
* Official start of trail is on Kilvington Drive at the Gemco Theatre, at the far end of Emerald Station Park (on north side of railway).

Emerald to Emerald Lake (3km):
* Follow the blue signs with yellow arrows along the trail
* After a short distance, cross into Pepi’s Land on the south side of railway
* At Beaconsfield-Emerald Road, cross the railway (again) and road, taking care as it can be very busy.
* Follow the trail past the Emerald museum and down to the Nobelius Packing Shed (previously used for flower distribution but now the home of Puffing Billy’s night train dining experience)
* On entry to Emerald Lake Park, the recommended trail is to the left, down a steep zig-zag section and turn right at the T-junction.
* Follow this trail into the western car park of Emerald Lake reserve.
* Continue along the northern bank of Emerald Lake until arrival at the road intersection (Wombat Corner).

Emerald Lake to Cockatoo (5km):
* From Wombat Corner, pass beside the gate onto a beautiful, fern-lined trail that follows Wattle Creek, before crossing a sweeping bridge to arrive at Wright Road.
* Cross Wright Road and follow the trail to the right until the railway is crossed again, this time at the restored Wright Station.
* Pass through the gates to the left and follow the management road, Wright Track, into the Wright Forest
* Stay on Wright Track until a gate – turn left onto Boundary Track before the gate and follow it, past another couple of gates, down the steep incline to Baker Street.
* Turn left at Baker Street, down another steep incline to cross the bridge over Cockatoo Creek.
* Continue on the trail to Cockatoo, arriving at the Ash Wednesday Bushfire Education Centre, after crossing Bailey Road
* Continue on the trail along Bailey Road, across Healesville-Koo Wee Rup Road and the railway to enter the Cockatoo shopping precinct.

Cockatoo to Gembrook (6km):
* The trail continues along Fairbridge Lane, past the new IGA supermarket, to join the main road, Belgrave-Gembrook Road.
* The trail passes through Cockatoo beside Belgrave-Gembrook Road, past the Cockatoo Primary School and into Old Gembrook Road.
* Continue along the trail until Doonaha Road where the trail meets the railway again, at the restored station, Fielder.
* Cross the often-busy Belgrave-Gembrook Road with care and continue on the trail beside Fielder Road.
* Another crossing of B-G Road is needed at the Mapleridge Local Produce Centre (small market of local produce).
* The trail now follows the Puffing Billy Railway all the way to Gembrook.
* Continue on the trail from Mapleridge with spectacular views over the rich farming country in all directions
* At the top of the hill, just after the crossing at Orchard Road, is the Gembrook Sports Ground and the final trail crossing of railway.
* Continue on the trail and again cross B-G Road at the Gembrook outskirts
* Follow the trail along the southern side of the railway along Station Road where the trail ends at Main Street, Gembrook.
* Note the Eastern terminus of the Puffing Billy Railway, Gembrook Station, on the left of the trail.
* Unfortunately, the Gembrook Hotel burned down recently, but there are many shops & cafes available in Gembrook, all on the main street.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Runs alongside the historic Goldfields railway track, along which restored steam trains run between Maldon and Castlemaine on Wednesdays and Sundays
  • Catch the train from Melbourne to Castlemaine, ride to Maldon for lunch, then return --- or take the steam train one way as a treat!

Attractions

  • The volunteer-run Victorian Goldfields Railway restored this railway track and the steam trains that run along it: these can be viewed at the Maldon Railway Station
  • The attractive towns at both ends have significant historical interest
  • Maldon is notable for its 19th century townscape

Trail Guide

The trail and rail line pass through box ironbark woodland and provide glimpses of grazing land. Muckleford station site has a picnic table and is a good place to stop and rest; there are toilets here but they are only open when tourist trains run – there are no other toilets or drinking water along the trail.

It is possible to ride in one direction, and take the train back to the start.  Bikes can be taken on the train.  It is mainly downhill from Maldon to Castlemaine.

Section Guides

Castlemaine to Muckleford Station (8 km)

  • Starting at Langslow St, the trail follows the railway line.
  • Passes through woodland and gently undulating open farmland

Muckleford Station to Maldon (9.7 km) 

  • This section has more forest than farmland. After Maldon Railway Station there is a short ride along the trail to the remains of the historic Beehive mine, with its intriguing brick chimney
  • Maldon has a number of good cafes and hotels

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Dja Dja Wurrung people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

The trail was built in 2016-17 and officially opened in March 2017.

Rail line history 

  • Castlemaine Station is on the Melbourne to Bendigo line and was established in 1862
  • A branch line to Maldon and on to Newbridge via Shelbourne began 1 km south of Castlemaine (from the Maryborough branch line) and was completed in 1884
  • Bushfires in 1969 destroyed rail infrastructure between Maldon and Shelbourne, and the line from Newbridge to Castlemaine closed soon afterward
  • The line between Maldon and Castlemaine was preserved, and reopened as the Goldfields Tourist railway in 2005

The Bike Vault – bike hire in Castlemaine

The Victorian Goldfields Railway runs heritage trains

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Construction to start on Castlemaine to Maldon Rail Side Trail

Posted: 28/05/16

The Mount Alexander Shire has announced that a tender for the construction of the 18km ...

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