Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • A short trail that runs along the eastern edge of the Margaret River townsite, suitable for hiking and cycling
  • Interesting birdlife and wildflowers
  • Links to other trails including the Ten Mile Brook Trail

Attractions

  • The new Margaret River footbridge
  • Views over countryside

Trail Guide

Also known as the Wannang Biddi, the Darch Road Trail begins at the Ten Mile Brook Trail (Bunitj Biddi) just west of Margaret River Perimeter Rd. Heading south, the trail crosses the river via newly build footbridge then joins the alignment of a historic timber tramway formation before finishing at Andrews Way (formerly known as Rosa Brook Rd)

Background Information

Traditional owners

Rail Trails Australia acknowledges the Wadandi people of the Noongar Nation, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which this rail trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

The Shire of Augusta Margaret River plans to build a connecting path linking the southern end of the Darch Trail to the Wadandi Track, enabling trail users to circumnavigate the Margaret River townsite via three rail trails – the Wadandi Track, the Ten Mile Brook Trail and the Darch Trail.

Rail line history

The Darch Trail follows one of the many old timber tramways in the Margaret River area.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
The Manjimup to Deanmill Heritage Trail is a short rail trail near Manjimup in WA’s Southwest. The trail gives visitors an insight into the district’s forestry, farming and railway history. Manjimup is known for its undulating land, tall timbers, abundant fresh water and rich soils.

Attractions

  • Tall forest, scenic open farmland
  • The small timber town of Deanmill, which includes a number of historic mill cottages, the Deanmill Workers Club and the Deanmill Football Oval
  • Other attractions in around Manjimup including Fontys Pool, Diamond Tree Lookout and One Tree Bridge

Trail Guide

The Manjimup to Deanmill Heritage Trail is on the alignment of a historic timber tramway that connected the Deanmill sawmill to the main line at Manjimup. Starting in Manjimup near the intersection of Rose St and Lock St, the trail heads west parallel to Ipsen St.

The trail passes through enclosed natural bushland before transitioning to open areas with views over farmland. The first kilometre is asphalt and the remainder is compacted gravel.

At its eastern end, this trail provides a connection to the Manjimup Linear Path. Forming a ‘T’, the two rail trails intersect in the centre of Manjimup just south of Ipsen Street. The Manjimup to Deanmill Heritage Trail also forms part of the 1000 km Munda Biddi MTB trail linking Perth to Albany.

Background Information

Traditional owners

Rail Trails Australia acknowledge the Murrum people of the Noongar Nation, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which this rail trail is built.

Development and future of the rail trail 

The Manjimup to Deanmill Heritage Trail was established in the 1990s and upgraded in 2017.

Rail line history 

The Deanmill tramway was built in 1912 to connect the sawmill (which supplied timber sleepers for the Transcontinental Railway) to the main line in Manjimup. The Deanmill settlement was named after the mill’s first manager, Alfred Dean. Following the closure of the tramway in 1966, the reserve has regrown and forms an important green corridor on the western side of Manjimup.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • A short trail of 25 km, making it suitable for day trippers as well as locals
  • Both Broken Hill and Silverton would benefit economically from this trail
  • Ecotourists would be attracted to this unique trail

Attractions

  • Visit the real Outback of NSW
  • Line of Lode Miners Memorial
  • Sulphide Street Railway and Historical Museum
  • Broken Hill Sculptures and Living Desert Sanctuary
  • Pro Hart Gallery
  • Royal Flying Doctor Service
  • White’s Minerals and Mining Museum
  • Mad Max Museum at Silverton
  • Silverton Hotel

Trail Guide

A short section of this trail is open at the Silverton end.

A couple of small bridges have been restored for walkers and bikes.

Mountain bikes are recommended, as it is rough and sandy in sections.

Section Guides

Broken Hill to Silverton (25 km)

This trail would run through outback countryside, mainly paralleling the road between the two sites.

Broken Hill is a large regional city with plenty of food and accommodation.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Wiljali people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail will be built.

Development and future of the rail trail

As of June 2021 there is no active committee trying to lobby for the construction of a rail trail on this disused corridor.  Rail Trails Australia views this as a viable potential rail trail, and would be keen to support any person or group to lobby for its construction.

If you are interested, contact us at nsw@railtrails.org.au

Rail line history 

This was part of an old private narrow-gauge tramway between Cockburn and Broken Hill, owned by the Silverton Tramway Company. It was built in 1888 to transport ore from the Silverton mines to Port Pirie, SA and extended to Broken Hill when minerals were discovered there.

The NSW Government completed a standard-gauge line direct from Broken Hill to Cockburn in 1970. This led to the demise of the privately owned Silverton line and it closed to rail traffic shortly thereafter. The ownership of the rail corridor was returned to the Crown, with some sections sold off to adjacent landholders.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Short walking trail situated 2 km from Buderim town centre
  • Follows an old narrow gauge (2' 6") tramway through bushland
  • The trail is suitable for walkers only.
 

Attractions

This is a well-maintained walking path in the Buderim region of the Sunshine Coast.

The general standard of this trail is good, but care must be taken during wet weather due to slippery pathways.

 

 

 

Trail Guide

Access to this trail is on the corner of Mons and Telco Road, Buderim  (2 km from Buderim Town Centre), with parking on the left hand side of  Telco Road. The path down to the trail is on the right hand side of Telco road and is well sign posted.

The site of the original Telco Station is about 100m towards Buderim from the parking area. From the entrance it is all downhill to the Mons Station site (1100m from the start) and the trail continues on to Liana Place (2km) which is the current end of this trail.

Personal mobility vehicles would be able to access the first 800m. The entrance has a sealed zig zag path,while the rest is compacted earth.

There are no water bubblers or toilet facilities on this trail.

Background Information

Traditional Owners 

We acknowledge the Gubbi Gubbi people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Railway History

This Tramway was built to narrow guage (2’6″) and left the QGR at Palmwoods Station.

No part of the orginal line remains, but there are some sleepers still visible on the walking trail.

The part of the current QR line that runs behind the Palmwoods station is known as the Buderim Loop.

Station along this line were Chevallum, ForestGlen, Mons , Telco, Glenmount and Buderim. There was a siding with a crane called Guys Siding near the Buderim end of the line.

The first train ran on 1st December 1914 and the line was officially opened on the 15 th June 1915.

It was closed on 10th August 1935.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Come and enjoy the Buderim Tramway Centenary June 20 (S.E. QLD)

Posted: 05/06/15

Buderim-Palmwoods Heritage Tramway walk will be celebrating their Centenary on 20 June 2015. Celebrations will include unveiling ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • This is a new high quality rail trail featuring a variety of landscapes from suburbia to dense bushland.
  • The trail links to other cycleways that give mainly traffic-free access to Newcastle’s university, city and other suburbs.
  • The rail trail is gently graded.
  • Preserved railway memorabilia at Wallsend Station site

Attractions

  • Newcastle City
  • Beaches
  • Fort Scratchley 

 

Trail Guide

Major access points:

  • Glendale – Frederick St North (Parking at TAFE)
  • Wallsend – Cowper St car park
  • Birmingham Gardens – Blue Gum Rd and Wilkinson Ave
  • Jesmond – Illoura St and Newcastle Rd
  • Lambton – Howe St West

Section Guides

Glendale to Wallsend (4.5 km)

The trail climbs on a slight gradient through bushland, then runs through grassland behind retirement villages.

  • From the north end of Frederick St head north from Glendale TAFE car park to the trailhead, the trail winds over gentle hills and through the tunnel beneath Newcastle Link Rd.

Wallsend to Jesmond (3.5 km)

This section is basically flat and passes two suburban shopping centres. It follows the line of disused colliery rail lines and the tramway. It runs along a suburban street before crossing Newcastle Rd at traffic lights.

  • Take care crossing roads at Wallsend and at Jesmond.
  • Note the restored railway shed and old coal wagon at Wallsend.

Jesmond to Lambton (2 km)

After crossing a busy road you enter quiet Jesmond Park, following a long embankment before climbing over a low section of Lambton Hill at Howe St traffic lights.

  • Take care crossing Robinson Ave, especially if approaching downhill.
  • This ride can be extended picking up cycleways that pass through Broadmeadow parks and through Islington to Carrington then along the waterfront to the lighthouse at Nobbys. The line also connects to the University of Newcastle via a powerline easement and University Drive.

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Awabakal people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Railway history

This trail follows a tram route that went from Newcastle to Wallsend from 1910 to 1930.

The tramway opened in 1910 as part of the longest line of Newcastle’s extensive tramways, featuring steam-driven trams that ran down suburban streets and into bushland. The terminus was at West Wallsend, a coal-mining village 20 km from Newcastle. A branch line also reached Speers Point, Lake Macquarie, a popular picnic venue for Newcastle residents. The electrification of the Newcastle tram system reached Wallsend in 1926; steam trams were uneconomical and lines beyond Wallsend closed in 1930. Place names such as Plattsburg and Young Wallsend have disappeared along with most evidence of this line.

 

No services listed for this rail trail.

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NSW continues the momentum for developing cycling facilities

Posted: 19/06/20

Lake Macquarie and Newcastle City Councils are showing what can be done when it comes ...

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Glendale to Wallsend Rail Trail Opening

Posted: 14/06/12

The $1.5 million Wallsend to Glendale shared pathway was officially opened on Friday 1 June 2012. The NSW ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Sometimes called the Mississippi Trail
  • This trail follows an old tramway along the Mississippi Creek bed on this linking trail.
  • The Gippsland Lakes Discovery Trail is your connection between the East Gippsland Rail Trail and the oceanside town of Lakes Entrance.
  • Hear the bellbirds calling and see the native wildflowers blooming in Spring.
  • An old marble quarry makes for a perfect morning tea stop as you are encompassed by shrubby lined trails meandering through the bush landscape.

Attractions

  • Provides a link from the East Gippsland Rail Trail and Lakes Entrance
  • Lovely bush trail that follows an old tramway along Mississippi Creek
  • Remains of old cuttings, including rail and sleepers
  • Remains of old marble quarry

Trail Guide

Access points

  • Colquhoun – junction of East Gippsland Rail Trail and Seaton Track
  • Log Crossing Picnic area – on Log Crossing Rd
  • Lakes Entrance
  • Junction of Scriveners Rd and Colquhoun Rd, 8 km north of Lakes Entrance

Section Guides

Note: Steep rough hills, isolated locations, uncontrolled road crossings, irregular maintenance

  • After leaving the East Gippsland rail trail, follow the trail south. This part has some steep sections
  • After 4km you reach the site of the old marble quarry.  There is a viewing platform and signage at this point
  • The trail follows the old tramway for the next 9km.  It mainly follows the Mississippi Creek, crossing it several times
  • You can stop at Log Crossing picnic area.  There are toilets and picnic facilities at this point
  • The tramway trail finishes when you reach Scriveners Road.  Turn left and follow Scriveners Rd until you reach Lakes Colquhoun Rd.
  • Turn right at Lakes Colquhoun Rd, and follow for 8km to reach Lakes Entrance

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Gunaikurnai people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Rail Line History

The Gippsland Lakes Discovery Trail follows the route of a tramway that was constructed in the early 1900s to move pink granite from a quarry on Mississippi Creek, to the North Arm of the Gippsland Lakes. The granite was used for buildings in Melbourne and also to construct a new permanent entrance to the Gippsland Lakes. The tramline was used until the 1940s.

 

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • A short trail that runs from Margaret River out to Ten Mile Brook Dam, suitable for hiking and cycling
  • Interesting bird life and wildflowers
  • Picnic site at Ten Mile Brook Dam which has toilet and barbecue facilities.
  • Linkages to the Wadandi Track and Darch Trail

Attractions

  • Rotary Park and the Old Settlement
  • Views over the Margaret River countryside
  • Ten Mile Brook Dam
  • Rusden picnic site

Trail Guide

Also known as the Bunitj Biddi, the Ten Mile Brook Trail starts in the Rotary Park near ‘Old Kate,’ a preserved steam engine at the northern edge of Margaret River. Much of the trail follows an old timber tramway formation that ran parallel to the Margaret River. The trail finishes at the Rusden picnic site at Ten Mile Brook Dam, built in the mid-1990s to supply water for Margaret River and other nearby townships.

Section Guides

This 15 km return trail is a combination of compacted earth and coarse gravel suitable for bikes. A bridge over the weir allows a safe crossing when the river is in full flow. When you arrive at the bridge you can return to the picnic ground along this path; the rest of this trail follows the meandering river with some wonderful views and scenery along the way.

Toward the eastern end of the trail there are two optional loops bypassing areas that can become flooded in winter months. Near the dam there is a picnic area, barbecues, toilets, and shelters. While walking along Ten Mile Brook Trail, keep an eye out for the white breasted robin, golden whistler and other bush birds. This is also a great spot for wildflowers in spring.

Background Information

Traditional owners

Rail Trails Australia acknowledges the Wadandi people of the Noongar Nation, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which this rail trail is built.

 

Development and future of the rail trail 

This trail was originally developed in the 1980s as part of national Bicentennial celebrations.

 

Rail line history

The Ten Mile Brook trail follows one of several old timber tramways in the Margaret River area.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • follows a former tramway from Jarrahdale to the site of the Balmoral POW Camp
  • traverses bushland and some farmland, passing a log loading ramp and several shield trees each carved with a number used by foresters in the 1920s as a grid reference system
  • provides a link with the Mundlimup Timber Trail, POW Camp Trail and Bibbulmun Track, plus the Munda Biddi Cycle Trail

Attractions

  • finishes at the POW Camp. Signage describes its operation and explains the ruins that remain. A walk option is from the POW Camp to Sullivan Rock carpark, linking up with the Bibbulmum Track, an extension of 9km
  • from the POW Camp, the trail passes through stands of Kingia australis grass trees before rejoining the timber tramway to Millar’s Log Road. Note the sleepers on the old tramway
  • the adjacent area was the site of Jarrahdale’s number 3 timber mill, called the ‘39 Mill’ because it was on the banks of 39 Mile Brook

Trail Guide

  • at one point the rail formation crosses a private farm. Stiles have been provided to allow access across the farm but cyclists are advised to follow the Munda Biddi Trail, which takes a slightly steeper route to avoid the private property
  • signage is lacking in a couple of places so a copy of the Munda Biddi Trail Map (Map 1) is recommended

Background Information

We acknowledge the Whadjuk people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

No services listed for this rail trail.

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