Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Honours elite junior local cyclist Shamus Liptrot who died in 2011, several years after suffering serious injuries in a cycling accident. Halbury was Shamus’s home town 
  • An excellent ride for all the family and can be extended to form a longer ride along the Wakefield Plains and Clare Valley
  • The history of the bullock and rail trails comes alive in Devil’s Garden adjoining the trail midway between Balaklava and Halbury
  • An excellent ride from Leasingham through the range to Halbury then Balaklava

Attractions

  • Dunn’s Bridge 1.5 km from Balaklava is  a single span bowstring arch bridge built in 1880 over the Wakefield River.
  • Devil’s Garden 7km from Balaklava, east of the Roberts Rd crossing is a small area of eucalypts that has a history of sand hills, bullock teams, corduroy roads and serious flooding. To find out more click here
  • Links to the Balaklava to Port Wakefield section of the Copper Rail Trail
  • Links to a back roads trail to the Riesling Trail (Leasingham) in the east

Trail Guide

The trail is flat and runs through a well vegetated corridor. At Roberts Rd about halfway, take time to visit Devil’s Garden.

Parking is available in Edith Tce, Balaklava, close to shops and amenities and a short distance from the trail at the junction of War Memorial Dr and Railway Tce. The trail begins on the northern side of the rail corridor just north of the intersection of War Memorial Dr and Railway Tce. Follow the path east along the back of Christopher St.

 

 

Section Guides

Balaklava to Halbury

The trail crosses Dunn’s Bridge 1.5 km from Balaklava. This metal bowstring arch bridge was built in 1880 and heritage listed in 1995.

A further 3 km along the trail there is a small bridge over a creek. Dismount to cross the bridge; it is narrow with an uneven surface.

Use Roberts Rd 2 km along the trail to reach a roadside cairn that describes the Devil’s Garden, a fine example of mallee box woodland.

The rail trail terminates at Halbury, but a well signed back roads trail can be followed over the range to Leasingham and the Riesling Trail

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Kaurna and Ngadjuri people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the trail is built.

Rail history

The line from Balaklava to Blyth opened in 1876 and closed in 1988. The rails and sleepers were removed shortly after, and the rail trail was built in 2012.

There is a memorial to Shamus Liptrot at the junction of the trail and Bridge Rd, 1 km from Balaklava.

The 37 km Copper Trail begins at Port Wakefield follows an unused rail reserve 26 km to Balaklava and a further 11 km to Halbury. From Halbury the Copper Trail follows a signed route on back roads over the range to Leasingham on the Riesling Trail. 

Development and future of the Rail Trail

Wakefield Regional Council is planning to extend the trail beyond Halbury, following the unused rail corridor north. Ultimately, the Copper Rail Trail may connect with the Southern Flinders Rail Trail.

No services listed for this rail trail.

Advertise your Business Here

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New Copper Rail Trail Opened in South Australia

Posted: 18/07/20

The Wakefield Regional Council, located in the mid north of South Australia, has constructed a 26...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • A ‘bush track’ rail trail that provides a challenge for mountain bikers who enjoy a challenge
  • Forms an important link with other trails in the region and can be part of a larger ride through the Wakefield Plains, Clare Valley and Yorke Peninsula
  • Many historical features and structures 
  • Very welcoming community 

Attractions

  • Links with Walk the Yorke Walking and cycling trail in Port Wakefield
  • Links with a back-roads trail to the Riesling Trail in the east
  • Cuts through an area of century plant (Agave americana) with 6 m high flower stalks
  • Caravan parks at Port Wakefield and Balaklava

Trail Guide

Overall description

The trail surface varies from rubble /gravel to a formed natural earth surface, and is suited to walkers and  adventurous riders. Make sure you have water and food; there are no facilities between Balaklava and Port Wakefield.

The trail runs between flat, open grain fields, but thanks to the efforts of the local community, which planted the rail reserve with indigenous vegetation 30 years ago, the trail now provides visitors with shade as well as great scenery.

Balaklava has good parking in Edith Terrace, near shops and amenities, and a short distance from the trail at the junction of Hudson Rd and Balaklava Rd.

Port Wakefield has good parking, cafes and amenities. Construction work will begin soon on the duplication of the Princess Highway through Port Wakefield, so it may be worth parking near the beginning of the path east of the golf course on Balaklava Rd.

NOTE: the Shamus Liptrot Rail Trail, 11 km from Balaclava to Halbury, forms part of the Copper Rail Trail and is described in more detail in its own webpage 

Section Guides

Port Wakefield to Bowmans (10 km from Port Wakefield Golf Course)

The trail will ultimately begin at the start point for the Walk the Yorke walking and cycling trail, but cyclists should start the trail on the northern side of Balaklava Rd just east of the Port Wakefield Golf Course.

This section of trail is flat and has a compacted earth surface. The corridor has some vegetation and Council plans to add new planting.

About 6 km out Port Wakefield Golf Course the trail passes through a dense planting of century plants, easily recognisable by their long, tapered dull grey green leaves and 6 m tall flower spikes.

A further 2 km from the century plants the trail crosses a farm entrance where several railway sleepers were left in place when the rails were removed.

Take care when using the road crossing to cross the rail line just before Bowmans: this is a major freight route and carries many high-speed trains each day. 

 

Bowmans to Balaklava (15 km)

Bowmans was once a thriving railway town and many of the original railway houses are still occupied. The Bowmans railway loading platform is visible on the side of the trail.

Vegetation increases in the trail corridor as the trail progresses to Balaklava; there are small sections of old man saltbush and bullock bush, which were once common in this area.

This section has some sections of compacted earth, but is mainly compacted rubble.

Use Balaklava Road to enter Balaklava. A small section of railway line has been retained from Hudson Rd to Whitwarta Rd on the approach to Balaklava, and the original railway turntable is visible on the corner of Whitwarta Rd and Balaklava Rd.

Background Information

Traditional owners

We acknowledge the Kaurna and Ngadjuri people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the trail is built.

Rail history

A private horse-drawn tramway was built from Port Wakefield to Balaklava and on to Hoyleton in 1869. It was later taken over by the SA Government and converted to steam train. The line closed in 1984.

Up to construction of the horse drawn tramway the alignment of the line was used by bullock teams to transport copper from Burra to Port Wakefield.

The Copper Trail continues along an unused rail reserve another 11 km to Halbury as the Shamus Liptrot Rail Trail. From Halbury the trail follows a signed route along back roads, over the range to Leasingham on the Riesling Trail. 

Development and future of the Rail Trail

Wakefield Regional Council is planning to extend the trail beyond Halbury, following the unused rail corridor northward. The trail may ultimately connect with the Southern Flinders Rail Trail.

No services listed for this rail trail.

Advertise your Business Here

Click here for information on advertising your rail trail support business.

New Copper Rail Trail Opened in South Australia

Posted: 18/07/20

The Wakefield Regional Council, located in the mid north of South Australia, has constructed a 26...

More...

Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • Good climate most of the year
  • This is a short trail mainly through state forest
  • Imbil is well situated with food and accommodation options
  • Imbil Railway Station is well preserved
  • Suitable for a long walk, or a short out and back ride

Attractions

  • Scenic rural countryside
  • Imbil has a substantial railway bridge over Yabba Creek
  • Railway history and heritage
  • The Mary Valley Rattler train runs on Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday between Gympie and Amamoor (13 km north of Imbil)

Trail Guide

The 4.5 km open section of the trail runs through the towns of Imbil and Brooloo.

Most of the rail trail passes through State forest; there are bellbirds along the trail as well as many other native animals.

  • The access at Imbil is via William St (limited parking)
  • The access at Brooloo via Sutton St
  • Toilets and drinking water at Imbil
  • A few gates to open and close

Section Guides

Imbil to Brooloo (4.5 km)

  • cafes, hotel, fuel, caravan park, motel
  • no toilets or drinking water at Brooloo

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Gubbi Gubbi people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is built.

Development and future of the trail

The rail trail was developed by Gympie Regional Council.

It is hoped to see the Mary Valley Rail Trail extended from Imbil to Amamoor, adding around 16 km to the trail. Gympie Regional Council has earmarked the extended trail as the key catalyst project for the Mary Valley in its 2019-24 Tourism Strategy, and is applying for funding to carry out a Feasibility Study.

Railway history

The Mary Valley line was a branch line of the North Coast railway line, which branched just south of Gympie and continued to Brooloo in the upper Mary Valley.

It was built between 1911 and 1915 to facilitate closer settlement of the Mary River Valley and reached the terminus of Brooloo in April 1915.

The line had become unprofitable by the 1970s and in 1988 staff were withdrawn from all of the stations and some buildings such as goods sheds and residences were sold for removal.

The Mary Valley Heritage Railway Board set out to operate a tourist train on the line in 1996 using volunteers and trainees; tourist train services began in May 1998.

The train currently runs from Gympie as far as Amamoor on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays.

For more information click on:

https://www.maryvalleyrattler.com.au/tickets-and-timetable/

No services listed for this rail trail.

Advertise your Business Here

Click here for information on advertising your rail trail support business.

Celebrate the Inaugural Mary Valley Rail Trail Fun Run (S.E. Qld)

Posted: 18/01/20

The Mary Valley Rail Trail Easter Fun Run is happening on 11 April 2020. The Imbil Easter ...

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Gympie Council wins prestigious award

Posted: 27/12/19

Gympie Regional Council has been formally recognised for its contribution to outdoor spaces with the ...

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Come celebrate the opening of Queenslands newest Rail Trail

Posted: 20/07/19

The much-anticipated Mary Valley Rail Trail opens Sunday 28 July 2019 with a fun-filled community open day. ...

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Mary Valley Rail Trail construction works underway

Posted: 27/05/19

Construction activities have commenced for the Mary Valley Rail Trail from Imbil to Brooloo near ...

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Mary Valley Rail Trail planning feedback (Queensland)

Posted: 04/07/18

Gympie Regional Council is currently in the preliminary stages of planning the Mary Valley Rail ...

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Map Legend:

  • Rail Trail
  • On Road
  • Possible Rail Trail
  • Other Trail
  • former Railway
  • At 270 km when completed, Australia’s longest rail trail
  • The 32 km Dawes Range section, opened in September, goes from Barimoon Siding to Builyan Sidings. The trail passes through six tunnels and offers stunning mountain views, with an array of National Parks nearby
  • The Gayndah to Mundubbera section will open in the near future and will follow the Burnett River, which offers canoeing
  • Camping available along the trail

Attractions

  • Abundant birdlife, wildlife and views
  • Good climate most of the year
  • Railway history and heritage
  • Burnett River (Gayndah to Mundubbera section)
  • Camping and accommodation options in towns along the trail and at
  • Kalpowar State Forest
  • Glassford Creek Copper Mine, Kroombit Tops, Bulburin National Park
  • Gayndah (Queensland’s oldest inland town) and Mundubbera are the State’s citrus capitals
  • Dawes Range section is
  • Close to Monal goldfields
  • RM Williams Bush Learning Centre and Visitor Information Centre at Eidsvold

Trail Guide

  • Parking at rail sidings
  • Water and toilets available in most small towns along the trail
  • Most bridges intact, but are not accessible
  • Care should be taken after heavy rains

Section Guides

Gayndah to Mundubbera (29 km)

  • No toilets or drinking water along the trail
  • Gravel; suitable for all bicycles, walking and horse riding

This section of the trail will open before the end of 2021. It includes stunning views of the Burnett River and koalas have been sighted in the eucalypt forest beside the trail.

The 29 km Burnett River Bridges section from Gayndah to Mundubbera is close to the river and has a remarkable number of heritage listed bridges.

Camping is available at Gayndah Railway Station and Mundubbera Show grounds.

Kalpowar to Builyan (32 km): opened September 2021 at Barimoon Siding, Kalpowar

  • Gravel surface suitable for wheelchairs, walkers, prams and general rail trail use
  • Showers and toilets at Builyan Community Hall; toilets at Many Peaks railway dam
  • Cattle on corridor
  • Borders Kalpowar State Forest, where there is a camping area with a toilet about 2 km from Barimoon Siding
  • No mobile phone service: UHF can be used in the area
  • Bring all you food and water: closest shops are at Builyan or Monto

The trail passes through the townships of Kalpowar, Barimoon Siding, Golembil Siding, Many Peaks and Builyan.

There are six historic tunnels built just after World War I.

Tunnel 1 is 100 m long; Tunnel 2 is 115 m; Tunnel 3 is 100 m; Tunnel 4 is 110 m; Tunnel 5 is 150 m and Tunnel 6 is 150 m.

Tunnel 6 still has the rail line and the original ‘hogback’ sleepers.

Background Information

Traditional Owners

We acknowledge the Wuli Wuli and Gureng Gureng people, the traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which the rail trail is situated.

Railway history

Queensland Railways constructed an inland railway loop from Mungar (south of Maryborough) to near Gladstone via Monto — a total of 406 km. The first section from Mungar opened in 1889 and the last section to join Monto from Gladstone opened in 1931.

The last regular train ran in 2002 and the last train was a steam special in 2008.

The 125 km Mungar to Gayndah track is still in place and may be used in the future.

In 2012 several community groups from towns along the rail line from Gladstone to Maryborough held discussions with the Queensland Government about the future of the corridor, which closed in 2002.

Each district had its own aims and ambitions, ranging from preserve the tracks as a working railway to developing the corridor as a recreational trail to showcase the old infrastructure while creating a rail trail to attract a range of tourists to the towns and districts along the path of the old corridor.

No services listed for this rail trail.

Advertise your Business Here

Click here for information on advertising your rail trail support business.

Boyne Burnett Rail Trail – Opening the Dawes Range Section

Posted: 03/10/21

The opening of the Dawes Range section of the Boyne Burnett Inland Rail Trail in ...

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Boyne Burnett Inland Rail Trail Report Released

Posted: 23/05/19

The Boyne Burnett Inland Rail Trail would provide a link between Taragoola, near Gladstone, south ...

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